24 January Science 8 Fermentation of sucrose by yeast

  1. Review DSN entry from previous class.
  2. Review information about fermentation from previous class http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2018/01/22/22-january-science-8-reflection-on-carbon-presentations-reading-about-fermentation-respiration-metabolism/
  3. Prepare DSN entry for today’s class.
  4. We will set up yeast fermentation of sucrose in a warm water solution. Here is a very simple procedure: http://www2.mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk/microscopes4schools/yeast.php
  5. Try 2 methods for observing the bubbling–bottle with a balloon and flask with a gas delivery tube and a test-tube with limewater (an indicator of carbon dioxide).
  6. The temperature to “activate” yeast is important. See these temp. ranges reported from the Exploratorium. Which should you use? Why?: https://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/bread/yeast_temp.html
  7. Once your fermentation set-ups are bubbling along. Put a drop of the solution (try to avoid any of the solid material) on a slide and cover with a coverslip. Wipe off excess liquid on the slide (outside of the coverslip) before placing it on the microscope. Focus on low power, then move to the middle power (what is the magnification?). Check with Dr. F before moving to highest power. Watch the yeast cells. You may see some in the process of dividing–called budding. Sketch what you see. Try to take photos. The ipad stands can make this easier. You may need to adjust the light on your microscope. Also try to add a stain–iodine or methylene blue (not both at the same time). The stains may be taken up by structures within the yeast cells.
  8. An important thing to think about is how all life is based on cells and that the incredible chains of chemical reactions that characterize life take place within cells in the various organelles. Energy transformation occur in the mitochondria–and when we look at green plants next, the “capturing” of the sun’s energy in the bonds of certain molecules in chloroplasts. The nucleus of the cell is where the genetic information resides in the form of DNA. The process of reproduction involves copying the DNA and the dividing. Various segments of DNA are codes for the cells to make certain molecules. Other segments are a little like switches that turn on and turn off the action of molecule making segments. Again, just contemplate the incredible sets of reactions that make life what it is from a cell, to an organism, to an ecosystem, to the entire earth.
  9. Use the ball and stick molecular models to simulate the reactions that take sucrose to ethanol and carbon dioxide during anaerobic fermentation by yeast. (Remember the conservation of mass AND the idea that each reaction will involve the simplest steps.)
  10. To further strengthen your appreciation for the significance of cells, read another chapter from Lives of a Cell by Lewis Thomas:

Micrograph taken by 8th grader with Ipad of yeast cells (stained with methylene blue).

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23 Jan Science 7 More on flowers, fruits, biodiversity

  1. Have you turned in a paper copy of your PIP proposal? Do you have a digital copy in your DSN?
  2. Review notes from previous DSN entry.
  3. Is your DSN complete? Are you reflecting in each entry? Is your DSN uploaded correctly? Do you have all photos and notes included? Is everything well-organized and well-labeled?
  4. Look over today’s blogpost. There is homework!
  5. Prepare your DSN entry for today’s class.
  6. Together let’s watch (using a stop, ask, discuss, and write technique):

A Confusion of Names from Botany: A Blooming History: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cVDpdmlpZKw

Some information about the episode:

A Confusion of Names

What makes plants grow is a simple enough question. The answer turns out to be one of the most complicated and fascinating stories in science and took over 300 years to unravel.Timothy Walker, director of Oxford University Botanic Garden, reveals how the breakthroughs of Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus, Chelsea gardener Phillip Miller and English naturalist John Ray (sometimes Wray) created the science of botany. Between them, these quirky, temperamental characters unlocked the mysteries of the plant kingdom, and they began to glimpse a world where bigger, better and stronger plants could be created. Nurseryman Thomas Fairchild created the world’s first artificial hybrid flower – an entirely new plant that didn’t exist in nature.Today, botanists continue the search for new flowers, better crops and improved medicines to treat life-threatening diseases.

Some information about Timothy Walker:

A few questions to consider:

  • How do we learn what to notice? How do we know what to look for? How do we learn to notice something that we have never noticed before? How do we learn to “un-notice” something our mind has invented that is not really the way things are–think of the backwards bike or the drawings of ants we made from memory?
  • What do you make of Walker taking the time to show a statue of Newton during a video documentary about plants?
  • Early in the video Walker discusses the idea of variation in a plant species. What does he say?
  • What questions captured the attention of historical botanists and directed their observations and thinking?
  • What patterns and relationships came to mind as the various botanists in history observed plants?
  • How did Darwin’s ideas help explain the patterns and methods of organizing and classifying the plant world that had emerged from the work of Ray (Wray), Linnaeus, Miller, Fairchild, and others?
  • So far, we have looked at Darwin’s ideas (for example, more offspring are produced than survive), at the structure of some flowers and fruits, at the idea of plants being related based on similarities of flowers and fruits, at particular trees (your partner tree), at the diversity of certain groups of animals (during WOW 7 and preparation for WOW7), like spiders and aquatic macro-invertebrates, and birds.
  • One primary set of questions is about the diversity of living things (biodiversity): How many kinds? How many of each kind? How are the kinds distributed?
  • More complex questions follow:What are the relations among different kinds of living thing? How do different kinds of living thing interact with the environment? How does an organism’s genetic inheritance interact with the environment?

If there is time today, begin the following. If not, do this as homework.

  • Find as many examples of flowers with corresponding flower shapes (http://flowersofindia.net/flowershapes/) as you can on the AES campus. Take photos and categorize by shape. Include names if you know. Put plants into groups based on your assessment of the similarity of their flowers.
  • Add to your partner tree information by both direct observation and research from reliable references. What can you find out about the various names of your tree? How can you relate the scientific name of your tree to information from the video “A Confusion of Names?”

We will conduct a biodiversity walk together during the next class. Be prepared to notice flowers, fruits, different kinds of plant. Be prepared to see things you have never seen or noticed before. Be prepared to point out your partner tree and to share information with the class at the appropriate time.

Please ask any questions that you have.

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22 January Science 8 Reflection on Carbon presentations; Reading about Fermentation, Respiration, Metabolism;

  1. Review DSN entry from last class. http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2018/01/18/18-january-science-8-presentations-on-carbon-and-carbon-cycle-respiration-fermentation-metabolism/
  2. Read today’s blogpost.
  3. Prepare DSN entry for today.
  4. Be sure that this reflection is completed:

*To what extent did our study of matter in Semester 1 prepare you for looking in more detail at Carbon, Carbon Chemistry, and the Carbon Cycle? Write a thoughtful response in the reflection section of your DSN entry for today–especially in relation to the ideas about learning in Lessons from Thin Air and the concepts about carbon in the other presentations.

5. One group has not uploaded their Carbon presentation. https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/18eJpR4pSfCB6x2cZpox4HgTL9u8BsdTy?usp=sharing

6. Review Carbon presentations from other classes in your own presentation groups. As a group send an email with content-based questions to the two corresponding groups. Seek clarification. Please do not pose any negatively critical questions.Compare your presentation thoughtfully with their. Include me, Dr. F, in the email. Each member of your group and each member of the group whose presentation you review. (You will need to send two emails).

7. As a group–same Carbon presentation groups read and discuss the following information about respiration, fermentation, metabolism. Carry out this reviewing, analyzing, and clarifying with the same high quality you used for the Carbon presentation.

Earlier in the year we talked about how food is both fuel and building material. In our study of matter, we looked at the conservation of mass. This meant taking the atoms at the beginning of a reaction and seeing how they are transformed into products at the end of the reaction. Every living thing takes in matter and gives out matter in a different form. In the process energy is also transformed. See the scientific claim about how a molecule whose bonds store energy is used by yeast and is then transformed into products which are expelled from the cell. The claim is stated in the two-step reaction equations. Of course, you need to pay close attention to the reaction equations.

  • Sucrose is converted to 2 molecules of glucose/fructose.
  • 1st step C12H22O11 + H2O + invertase → 2 C6H12O6

Glucose/fructose is converted to 2 molecules of ethanol and 2 molecules of carbon dioxide.

  • 2nd step C6H12O6 → 2 C2H5OH + 2 CO2  

  • (below: glucose, fructose, ethanol)

 

 

 

 

Related terms: Respiration, metabolism, fermentation, cellular respiration, aerobic respiration, anaerobic respiration

All of these terms refer to the myriad chemical reactions involved in “life” and based on carbon.

Many sets of reactions use carbon based molecules for fuel (energy) and for building material. In these processes one important end-product is carbon dioxide.

8.   See the following link to *Lives of a cell* by Lewis Thomas. This is a significant example of science writing for the general (educated) public. This work just preceded Primo Levi’s Periodic Table that you read or hear about in the Carbon presentations.

As a group pick out one of the chapters to read. Be prepared to share your reading through an annotation: full bibliographic information, description, summary, assessment, reaction. Learning to write good annotations is a skill you will need and use in your human impact project. Do this one together as a group. Be sure that each member has this sample annotation of one of the chapters from Lives of a Cell in her/his digital science notebook.

http://gyanpedia.in/Portals/0/Toys%20from%20Trash/Resources/books/cell.pdf

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lives_of_a_Cell:_Notes_of_a_Biology_Watcher

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19 January Science 7 The anatomy of a few Nightshade fruits (tomato, capsicum, aubergine, and more?)

  1. Review DSN entry from previous class. (blogpost from previous class: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2018/01/16/4417/ )
  2. Read blogpost for today.
  3. Prepare DSN entry for today.
  4. Turn in PIP proposal.
  5. Finish pic.collage of lily flower dissection. Include your names. Send file to mpeter@aes.ac.in
  6. Traditionally scientists grouped plants based on the anatomy of flowers and fruits. This system of classification began with a Swedish scientists, Carl Linneaus, http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/history/linnaeus.html
  7. With the discovery of DNA and improvements in DNA related technology, scientists are relying more and more on DNA comparisons to put plants into groups.
  8. Here is one of the latest efforts to classify plants: Giant poster: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1jAQRdabRvWQ-xwkaiVcngfHDkA0dfdaB/view?usp=sharing and explanation of poster: Global-Flora-Vol-1
  9. Look at the tomato vine, flower, and fruit.

10. Use this website to help you carefully dissect and document the anatomy of a tomato 11. http://www-plb.ucdavis.edu/labs/rost/tomato/Reproductive/anat.html.

12. Take pictures, make sketches, count and measure. Make a pic.collage. Plant the seeds.

13. Dissect and document the anatomy of the peppers (bell and chili). 

 

 

 

 

 

14. Dissect and document the anatomy of the aubergine (eggplant; brinjal)

15. See the fruit from the datura species.

16. Compare your observations of the different fruits. Why do you think scientists would group all the plants (whose fruits you have examined) in the same plant family? Nightshade https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solanaceae

17. If there is time, example some of the other flowers.

18. If there is time, work on your partner tree project.

19. Take a look at A Confusion of Names from Botany: A Booming History: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cVDpdmlpZKw

20. See the notes on the board: Bring in plant material to try to propagate–seeds (Wild, from fresh fruits you eat, from dried whole seeds, like beans and corn or maize (try popcorn). For vegetative propagation, try stems, underground parts (potato, sweet potato, ginger, turmeric), leaves. Look in parks, gardens, markets, wild lands. Do this for Sci 7 AND think about possible PIP project ideas (a documented photo gallery, a project to observe and document growth, development, reproduction, a collection (seeds and fruit)–for example, bean family tree fruits and seeds found in Delhi, a photo collection of the flower diversity seen in Delhi–both horticultural and native/wild).

21. Remember the important idea highlighted by Darwin, “More offspring are produced than survive.”

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18 January Science 8 Presentations on Carbon and Carbon Cycle; Respiration, Fermentation, Metabolism

Link to previous blogpost: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2018/01/16/16-january-science-8-continue-carbon-jigsaw-activity-complete-presentation/

  1. Review DSN entry from previous class. (How are you doing with keeping your DSN complete and up-to-date? Send Dr. F an email if you need assistance.)
  2. Review the blogpost for today’s class.
  3. Prepare your DSN entry for today.
  4. 15 minutes to get ready for presentations.
  5. Presentations

a. Lessons from Thin Air (learning about carbon, the carbon cycle, photosynthesis, matter, atoms, how humans try to make sense of things, the persistence of conceptions that have made sense at one time in a person’s experience even though the ideas become challenged later by evidence and logic, the various challenges to learning, the value in learning of extended dialogue combined with firsthand experience.

b. Carbon from Primo Levi’s The Periodic Table. An advanced but beautiful narrative of a carbon atom–using story-telling and descriptive language to paint a picture of the reality of atomic theory and the particular element upon which all life depends.

c. An episode on Carbon and Carbon Chemistry from the 26 part series, The World of Chemistry, written and narrated by Roald Hoffmann, a Nobel Prize winner who holds Primo Levi’s writing in high esteem.

d. A 5-part program on Carbon from Robert Krulwich’s National Public Radio science series Krulwich Wonders. Extensive use of cartoon animation and music.

As you listen to each presentation, compare the ideas being presented with your own. Be prepared to ask questions. (Each student should identify questions and be prepared to ask.) How do the presentations related to one another, beyond the obvious link in that they all are about carbon in some way? The links for each of the resources used in the presentations are listed in previous blogposts. Feel free to consult them.

*To what extent did our study of matter in Semester 1 prepare you for looking in more detail at Carbon, Carbon Chemistry, and the Carbon Cycle? Write a thoughtful response in the reflection section of your DSN entry for today–especially in relation to the ideas about learning in Lessons from Thin Air and the concepts about carbon in the other presentations.

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Related terms: Respiration, metabolism, fermentation, cellular respiration, aerobic respiration, anaerobic respiration

All of these terms refer to the myriad chemical reactions involved in “life” and based on carbon.

Many sets of reactions use carbon based molecules for fuel (energy) and for building material. In these processes one important end-product is carbon dioxide.

Another set of reactions that occurs in green plants and phytoplankton (in the oceans) take carbon dioxide from the air and build carbon-based molecules that are then available for fuel and building material for these same plants and phytoplankton as well as for all the other organisms that depend on the molecules.

In the next class we will set up apparatus to observe fermentation of sucrose by yeast as an example of the first set of reactions–using a carbon based molecule to fuel the growth and reproduction of an organism.

In following classes we will look at the history of the discovery of photosynthesis and will replicate some of the important experiments and techniques.

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17 January Flowers–a starting point for Growth, Development, Reproduction–and–Biodiversity (also PIP proposal and Partner Tree observations and research)

  1. Review DSN entry from last class.
  2. Read today’s blogpost. Prepare your mind for the class.
  3. Open a new document for your DSN entry for the class.

A. How is your PIP proposal coming? Turn in a paper copy for the next class. Be prepared for feedback.

B. How is your partner tree research coming? See previous blogpost to test your knowledge and the completeness of your records.

C. Conduct the flower dissection and create a display of photographs and sketches with the following partner:

Flower dissection:

Groups: Be sure to up date your partner list–

Tomas Chihaya; Boris YeonWoo; Denzel HeeJun; Anton Avanka; JaeHun Michal; Dowoo Pauline; Bailey Yaroslav

Liam Reyha; Merrick Ananya; YuBin Marvin; JaeJun Sophie; Max Hangyeol; Jaeha Halen; Gabi Hyunjin; Sulaimaan JiWoo; YuMin David

  • Review the websites on parts of flowers and forms of flowers below.
  • Flowers are reproductive structures of a large group of plants–the flowering plants.
  • Examining the flowers will bring into view the major ideas of our topic this semester: Growth, Development, Reproduction–And when we look at the variation of “kinds”–Biodiversity.
  • There is background knowledge that will help you begin to make sense of the structures and functions of flowers. (For example, inheritance, genetics, chromosomes, genes, DNA, pollen, pollination, pollinator, nectar.)

Systematically record and dissect the flower(s) you are provided. 

Take a flower apart. Examining each “piece.” Think of the flower as a puzzle, where each piece fits together in a certain way. Do this carefully, imagining that you could put it back together in exactly the same way you found it. Imagine what the function of each “piece” is. Check your ideas against the references linked below (websites and videos).

PLAN BEFORE YOU CUT. READ THE REST OF THE DIRECTIONS.

Be careful with the dissecting tools.

Make a display with photos and sketches. Count parts. Measure. Provide a scale. Describe shapes and structures. If you know the name, that is fine. If you do not, simply describe. Discuss the possible function of each structure. How would you guess that the flower(s) is(are) pollinated? Why?

Use pic collage (ap) to arrange your photos into a display. Send the file to mpeter@aes.ac.in who will print and laminate your poster.

Use the magiscope for a magnified view. With help, use the compound microscopes to get a more magnified view. If pollen is present, try to get a view of a pollen grain. Use the microscopes as directed. Make sketches, take photos, include labels and descriptions.

Useful links: http://www.flowersofindia.net/

Flower parts: http://www.flowersofindia.net/misc/flower_parts.html

Flower shapes: http://www.flowersofindia.net/flowershapes/

http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/indexmag.html?http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/artjul99/pollen.html

Pollination videos and websites:

Make a note of these links. We will look at them as a class and you will need to review them (periodically) on your own or in a small group.

The Continuity of Life

http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/files/2012/04/The-Continuity-of-Life2.pdf

What Darwin Never Knew

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OV27qy6Gfb4

A Confusion of Names from Botany: A Blooming History

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cVDpdmlpZKw

Sexual Encounters of the Floral Kind

Notice the numbers in the pictures below!  See the 3’s and 6’s. This pattern is characteristic of monocots–the large group of flowering plants that includes grasses, palms, lilies, aroids.

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16 January Science 8–Continue Carbon jigsaw activity; Complete presentation; Human Impact topics

  1. Review DSN entry from previous class. (How are you doing with keeping your DSN complete and up-to-date? Send Dr. F an email if you need assistance.)
  2. Review the blogpost for today’s class.
  3. Prepare your DSN entry for today.

See previous blogpost: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2018/01/11/12-jan-science-8-carbon-jigsaw/

Continue reviewing your resources. Collaboratively prepare a 5 minute presentation in which all members of the group have contributed and have a role. After your presentation share with the class in this folder (one person from each group will need to have editing privileges): Science 8 Frazier Carbon / Carbon Cycle Presentations 1718  https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/18eJpR4pSfCB6x2cZpox4HgTL9u8BsdTy?usp=sharing

Description of resources. Background to references / authors. Main ideas. Significant details and supporting examples. Links to ideas from first semester–the atomic theory of matter. Are there explicit or implicit points of view evident in the resources? Explain. Big questions held by your group. Your thoughts on possible answers. Summary statement on what you have learned about carbon and the carbon cycle. Reference list slide.

Be ready to present your findings.

During presentations each class member should have questions to pose to the presenting group. Listen closely to see what you understand and to see which presented ideas correspond to ideas from your own reference/resource cluster.

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Human Impact on the Earth

You have already selected your topic (by lottery). You should have begun watching for items “in the news” and creating annotations. If you have not, be sure you start now:

Annotation (for each reference):

  1. Full bibliographic information, author, date, title, publication, volume, edition, page (or equivalent). If web-based, include the url, the date of posting (last edit), and the date you last accessed.
  2. Information about the author and publication–background, expertise, affiliation. If no author, focus on the publication.
  3. Content of the article. Be specific. Big ideas and enough of the significant details to get a sense of what the article is about.
  4. Point of view and usefulness. Is the article a report of original research or a review of research or an opinion-editorial or a reflective essay or some other genre? If a point of view being presented. What kind of evidence is used to support the points made in the article?

Topics

( < https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/1SXx0Zvtkx8C3SixY99dE-F5_GNS0XYM0yjkp3oNGqsg/edit?usp=sharing >)

  1. (Global) CO2–greenhouse effect–global warming–global climate change—shifting of carbon cycle
  2. India(Invasive species in India—loss of native habitat and biodiversity)
  3. (India) Endangered species. Habitat loss. Trade in endangered species. Animal human conflict. Conservation efforts in India.
  4. (Global)Elements in an Ipad-Laptop-Cell phone–Rare earths and conflict minerals—environmental costs of technology
  5. (India)Air quality in Delhi–air pollution
  6. (Global)The Anthropocene and the 6th great extinction
  7. (India)Mining-industrial, economic development, urban sprawl and conservation of nature / habitat / biodiversity in India
  8. (India)Agriculture-pesticides-fertilizer-nutrition and health in India
  9. (Global with local examples) The concept of ecosystem services—re-evaluating economic policy and theory in light of the environment—other ways to assess the value of the environment—international examples—Indian example.
  10. (India) The degradation and altering watersheds—River linking, dams.
  11. (India-Delhi) Access to clean water—sewage—pollution—irrigation—shortage of water.
  12. (Global) New Diseases. Zoonotic diseases. 
  13. (Global) Food security. Genetic engineering. Reduction in genetic diversity of food crops. Selection of herbicide resistant weeds. Loss of pollinator populations and diversity (pesticides and bees, for example).
  14. (Global and local) Deforestation–India, Tropics, Worldwide
  15. (Global and local) Climate denial, science denial, removal of environmental protections
  16. (Global and local) Current state of “green energy.” Renewable energy. Non-carbon based energy technologies
  17. (Global and local) Habitat restoration. “ Rewilding.”E.O. Wilson’s Half-Earth proposal.
  18. (Global and India) Promising environmentally sustainable practices and technologies (other than green energy examples from #16).
  19. (local)AES efforts to implement environmentally friendly practices. Areas for improvement. Suggestions.
  20. You choose—must be distinct from other options.
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15 Jan Science 7 Partner Tree and Personal Inquiry Project

The Personal Inquiry Project

During the coming semester, you will need to conduct what we shall call a Personal Inquiry Project.

There are only a few requirements:

  • The project should be something that interests you and motivates you very much.
  • The project should be related to some idea(s) and/or some practice(s) that are part of Science 7 (Motion; Energy; Growth-Development-Reproduction / Biodiversity; Natural Selection-Adaptation / Evolution). You should be able to provide rationale for the connection of your PIP to the Science 7 curriculum.
  • The PIP should involve significant firsthand experience and original thought/work.
  • The PIP will be presented to the school community (including parents) at the end of the year. Thus, it will need certain components. The details of the presentation / publication of projects will be determined through collaborative discussion with each student. The expectation is that the quality of the presentation / publication will be high.
  • A written description/explanation of the project will be required.
  • A written reflection including specified points will be required.
  • There is the possibility that the PIP will be included in Power School (especially regarding scientific practices as well as cross-cutting concepts and disciplinary core ideas).
  • Although some time will be provided during class, most of the time for the research and composition will come outside of class. There will be checkpoints along the way.
  • A proposal is made that identifies: 
    • Challenging Problem or Question
    • Key Knowledge, Understanding, and Success Skills 
    • Sources of personal interest and motivation
    • Clear connections to scientific concepts, ideas, practices from the Science 7 curriculum
    • A timeframe

There are a multitude of possibilities (each would need to be documented in a thorough and appropriate way):

  • An original experimental research project.
  • An original naturalistic field study research project.
  • Original creative non-fiction based on firsthand observations and experiences.
  • Original poetic writing based on firsthand observations and experiences.
  • Original art based on firsthand observations and experiences.
  • Original photography based on firsthand observations and experiences.
  • An original collection / display / exhibit like something curated for a museum.
  • A service project (there are many possibilities here from working with children to enhancing the environment to advocacy for some action).
  • An original invention, construction, or engineering investigation.
  • An original project that investigates cultural aspects of a science related topic (ethnobotany / ethnobiology possibilities are rich in India; traditional motion toys collected, built, performance investigated).
  • An original project that investigates practices that people might not immediately associate with science (food and cooking, for example).
  • An idea that you propose and for which you provide a convincing rationale.

Proposal:

  1. Name, date, period

  2. Topic, question (family of questions), and/or problem stated clearly with enough detail to indicate the direction your investigation will take initially.

  3. Background of your interest and motivation. The degree of your commitment. What things have you read, researched, done, investigated, and thought about that are related to your idea(s) up to this point?

  4. How is your proposal connected to the topics addressed in Science 7. You need to make a strong case.

  5. What do you expect to learn? What do you need to learn? Be specific as you can.

  6. Describe, the kind of inquiry, style of investigation, procedures you propose.

  7. Method for keeping a log/record/journal of your progress. This should include details of your activity AND details of your thinking and reflection.

  8. Description of the final product you have in mind. You will need to present a product AND a written component (see requirements above).

  9. Criteria for success. How should your inquiry and final product be evaluated? This should be specific and detailed.

  10. Timeline. Use a calendar and set specific goals. When will you work on your inquiry. (Showcase is scheduled for mid to late May.)

  11. Other. What else needs to be included in your proposal?

  12. Outcome of consultation (s) with Dr. F.

See this previous blogpost for more details: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2017/12/13/13-december-science-7-personal-inquiry-project/

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Partner Tree

Organize the observations and research you have done on your partner tree so far.

Visit your partner tree and add new details (changes that have taken place) and fill in missing information.

Use previous guidelines to help you know what to look for.

You should be able to:

  • Make a scale model of your tree’s leaves / leaf arrangement.
  • Accurately sketch and describe the branching pattern.
  • Recognize the bark pattern.
  • Identify the flowers and the fruit.
  • Have at least three reference links describing your tree species.
  • Have information on the importance of your tree species in the environment. What special uses of the tree are made by humans?
  • Have a gallery of useful photos and sketches of your tree and its parts.
  • Have names: Scientific, local, common English. Have information on how/why the tree is named. Watch A Confusion of Names from Botany: A Blooming History https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cVDpdmlpZKw
  • Be able to recognize your tree species in other settings. For example how many specimens of your partner tree species can be found on the AES campus, in the neighborhood where you live, in a favorite park (like Lodi Garden).
  • If you were to make an interpretive sign for you partner tree species, what would you include? Why?

See below–from a past blogpost:

Organize your observations from the first to today’s. Label your sketches and photos. What information should be included in a label? In a record of an observational visit? See the diagrams below showing what to look for when observing trees. Use these guidelines to enhance your observations. Develop a scheme or template that you will use for your observations of the partner tree. What are the things to notice? What will you need to do to clarify observations and thoughts about your individual specimen and the species (genus, family) to which your particular partner tree belongs?

A great riddle about learning in science: How can you learn to observe things that you have never noticed before?

Include observations that are detailed enough so that you could construct a scale model (made from paper?) of a branch with leaves of your species. You will need to decide the kind of leaves your species has. Think about the distinctions among leaves, like simple, compound, double compound.

Add important information about your tree species to your records through research from books and reliable websites.

Partner trees Science 7 1718   

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1dZ98jj6Cba88W8WAfXMi9FnHx52BMMWqECvX0U_iMBA/edit?usp=sharing

Some native trees:  suitabletreesdelhi

Compare the results of tree surveys by Sci 7 2015-2016s and 2016-2017

  1. 2016-17 Pd8: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/10Cn1AfKkJyn9sw6CqiqEKldKlSElFLnGuILofRyMm-s/edit?usp=sharing
  2. 2016-17 Pd6: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/110bXByMlkl6xHnX2nOhG8T1SJKmix273nlffkzCVfNk/edit?usp=sharing
  3. 2016-17 Pd5: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/10RdXmdn9v1838NjucBgUKcAR1SCu8o4YSyjeEUhIPRg/edit?usp=sharing
  4. 2015-16 Period8 treelistperiod8 or https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/1R3UemPGz8uowhkVtk43QhMRHLaIwWhMt4GyS2jsyaBc/edit?usp=sharing
  5. 2015-16 Period6  tree survey period6 or https://drive.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/file/d/0B4DPwlouN3dIeDdseWVUZEVWYTg/view?usp=sharing
  6. Tree list from FMO 2014-2015 school year (includes campus housing) Trees at AES 20142015 FMO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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12 Jan Science 8 Carbon jigsaw

  1. Review your DSN entry from the last class. Send an email to your parents AND Dr.F with your New Year’s Resolution / Plan to keep your DSN complete and up-to-date. Include a statement on how well you’ve done so far. Is your entry from the last class complete? Have you uploaded it properly in the DSN?
  2. Examine the class blog. Each cluster approaches aspects of carbon. The properties of carbon and how carbon behaves at various scales relates to one of the most significant earth cycle–the carbon cycle.
  3. Prepare your DSN entry for today’s class.

Finish science souvenirs. As you listen, try to make a sketch to help you remember and think about the souvenir offered by your classmate.

You will be assigned to a group to review and analyze references related to Carbon and the Carbon Cycle (everyone watch this short video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nzImo8kSXiU).

Work together to help each other examine, analyze, and try to understand your cluster of references. Identify important concepts–big ideas and significant details. Identify essential terms–discuss what they could mean from the context–rather than look up definitions that may be out of context. Identify questions you have and that your classmates are likely to have. Which parts of your references may prove confusing for your classmates? Why do you think so?

Prepare a 5 minute presentation based on your references that captures the main ideas and significant supporting examples. Find out what you can about the background of the references. (Who, how, what, why, etc.) Discuss how the references relate to what you already know about matter. Present the most important questions that you and your group have. What do you and your group suspect the point of view of the author(s) to be? Why? Identify bridges AND barriers to deeper understanding of the topic.

Group 1

Carbon

https://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=813

Group 2

Group 3

It’s All about Carbon

Group 4

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11 January Science 7 Entangled bank; Continuity of Life; Partner Trees

In groups analyze the passage. Note your questions. Select examples. Summarize your ideas and your group’s ideas.Share your group’s thinking with the full class. (The passage is from the 1st edition of Origin of Species: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/1228/1228-h/1228-h.htm )

1. It is interesting to contemplate an entangled bank, clothed with many plants of many kinds, with birds singing on the bushes, with various insects flitting about, and with worms crawling through the damp earth, and to reflect that these elaborately constructed forms, so different from each other, and dependent on each other in so complex a manner, have all been produced by laws acting around us.

2. These laws, taken in the largest sense, being Growth with Reproduction; Inheritance which is almost implied by reproduction; Variability from the indirect and direct action of the external conditions of life, and from use and disuse; a Ratio of Increase so high as to lead to a Struggle for Life, and as a consequence to Natural Selection, entailing Divergence of Character and the Extinction of less-improved forms.

3. Thus, from the war of nature, from famine and death, the most exalted object which we are capable of conceiving, namely, the production of the higher animals, directly follows.

4. There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2000/oct/22/booksnews.peopleinscience

+ + + + + + + +  + + +

Make a note of these links. We will look at them as a class and you will need to review them (periodically) on your own or in a small group.

The Continuity of Life

http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/files/2012/04/The-Continuity-of-Life2.pdf

What Darwin Never Knew

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OV27qy6Gfb4

A Confusion of Names from Botany: A Blooming History

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cVDpdmlpZKw

Sexual Encounters of the Floral Kind

+++++++++++++++

If there is time, visit your partner tree. Organize your observations from the first to today’s. Label your sketches and photos. What information should be included in a label? In a record of an observational visit? See the diagrams below showing what to look for when observing trees. Use these guidelines to enhance your observations. Develop a scheme or template that you will use for your observations of the partner tree. What are the things to notice? What will you need to do to clarify observations and thoughts about your individual specimen and the species (genus, family) to which your particular partner tree belongs?

A great riddle about learning in science: How can you learn to observe things that you have never noticed before?

Include observations that are detailed enough so that you could construct a scale model (made from paper?) of a branch with leaves of your species. You will need to decide the kind of leaves your species has. Think about the distinctions among leaves, like simple, compound, double compound.

Add important information about your tree species to your records through research from books and reliable websites.

Partner trees Science 7 1718   

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1dZ98jj6Cba88W8WAfXMi9FnHx52BMMWqECvX0U_iMBA/edit?usp=sharing

Some native trees:  suitabletreesdelhi

Compare the results of tree surveys by Sci 7 2015-2016s and 2016-2017

  1. 2016-17 Pd8: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/10Cn1AfKkJyn9sw6CqiqEKldKlSElFLnGuILofRyMm-s/edit?usp=sharing
  2. 2016-17 Pd6: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/110bXByMlkl6xHnX2nOhG8T1SJKmix273nlffkzCVfNk/edit?usp=sharing
  3. 2016-17 Pd5: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/10RdXmdn9v1838NjucBgUKcAR1SCu8o4YSyjeEUhIPRg/edit?usp=sharing
  4. 2015-16 Period8 treelistperiod8 or https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/1R3UemPGz8uowhkVtk43QhMRHLaIwWhMt4GyS2jsyaBc/edit?usp=sharing
  5. 2015-16 Period6  tree survey period6 or https://drive.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/file/d/0B4DPwlouN3dIeDdseWVUZEVWYTg/view?usp=sharing
  6. Tree list from FMO 2014-2015 school year (includes campus housing) Trees at AES 20142015 FMO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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