6 October Science 7 1-8 day Stream Art for WOW, Tumble Buddy Revision, Graphs from yesterday

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B7XSWuqcyqgSRFQzOWRIRmYydGM

Tumble Buggy revision is due by the end of school today. Paper copies of revision: Document explaining what was changed and why. Digital Science Notebook: Original. Revision. Document explaining what was changed and why. Incomplete revisions not considered.

Look at the graphs. Velocity vs. time is different from Distance vs. time. A straight line on a velocity vs. time graph means a constant rate of change of velocity or constant acceleration. A straight line on a distance vs. time graph means a constant rate of change of position or constant speed. A non-straight line–curved–on a distance vs. time graph means acceleration. If the curve is of a certain form (see the example below), then the acceleration will be constant. The example below is drawn from data of an object in free fall. The object is subject to the constant force of gravity. Remember the idea from class that the slope of a tangent drawn on the graph at an instant of time is the instantaneous speed. So you could figure out the speeds at each second and then construct a velocity vs. time graph. If the line is straight, then the acceleration is constant. Think about the distinctions. Ask questions for what seems confusing. Think of examples from class and from your own experience.

 

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5 October Science 7 Consolidating and Continuing Concepts of Motion

Today–let’s see where we are in our study of motion. Let’s begin by considering quantities and units used to measure and analyze motion. The techniques for measurement and analysis help define the concepts.

  • Space
  • meter (originally defined at 1 10,ooo,ooo of the distance from the earth to the equator)
  • Time
  • second (an early definition was debated as the period of 2 seconds (over and back) of a pendulum that has a length of (nearly) a meter; other methods involved subdividing a day based on observations of the sun or moon).
  • Speed
  • meters / second
  • Velocity (includes direction)
  • meters / second with the direction (straight) specified
  • Force (includes direction)
  • kilogram x meters/second2 (called a Newton)
  • Acceleration (includes direction)
  • meters / second / second; meters/seconds2
  • Work-Energy
  • Newton x meter = Kilogram x meter2 / seconds2 =Joule
  • Vector is a quantity that includes direction. Solving basic vector problems requires the use of algebra and geometry..
  • Sample data
  • Constant Acceleration
  • 0 m/s at 0 seconds; 1 m/s at 1 second; 2 m/s at 2 seconds; 3 m/s at 3 seconds; 4 m/s at 4 seconds; 5 m/s at 5 seconds.  Rate of acceleration 1 m/s/s. The speed changes 1 m/s every second.
  • Make a velocity vs. time graph
  • Acceleration due to gravity
  • From http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/1DKin/Lesson-5/How-Fast-and-How-Far
  • Instantaneous velocity—graphical method
  • Clay drop–“mystery of comparing the falls of lighter and heavier objects (not significantly affected by friction with the air–air resistance). Also class data from dropping a sizable lump of clay from various heights on the outdoor stairway.
  • Rotational motion—a demonstration to consider the importance of inertia and the idea that velocity includes direction
  • Newton’s 3 Laws
  • MomentumMass x velocity; Kg x meters/second
  • Conservation of Momentum–a simple suggestive demonstration
  • Air Pressure WaterRockets–design, performance, principles of Newtonian motion
  • Designing a rocket, building a rocket, predicting its performance, conducting launches (2 guaranteed), measuring and evaluating launches, creating a visual description AND explanation (no words, letters, or numerals. 2nd Summative project on motion. More details coming on what needs to be included.
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4 October Science 8 Beginning Chemical Reactions

Are you watching the moon and recording your observations? This is an important time to watch.

In the next few sessions, we will embark on exploration of chemical reactions. These investigations will yield observations to add to your repertoire. Our discussions will develop the idea that the behavior and properties of matter at the scale we observe can be explained by the behavior and properties of atoms and molecules. This grand explanation is called The Atomic-Molecular Theory of Matter. When consideration of energy is included the explanation is called The Kinetic-Molecular Theory of Matter.

On Friday, when we have a 1-8 day, we will have a lottery to select topics for our final unit of the year, Human Impact on the Earth. You are being assigned these topics at this time so that you can build a base of knowledge. You will need to begin collecting resources to build your familiarity and expertise in the topic area. More on Friday. Before WOW we will devote some time to preparing for the River–a preview of our unit Earth Cycles/Earth Systems.

Reaction 1.

Work with a partner that you have not worked with before, make a 50 ml solution of magnesium sulfate (Epsom salt) and another 50 ml solution of sodium carbonate (Washing soda). Keep a record of how much of each solute you add–the solutions should not be saturated. Leave no solid undissolved. Find the total mass of the beakers and solutions (as picture below).

Next pour solution 1 into solution 2. Do not spill. Observe what happens and describe in words. Take pictures. Measure the mass after mixing. Be sure to keep both beakers on the balance.

Share your data on the class spreadsheet: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/1V5y4RdyVXmki565eVOHY-iOgfw_zY0L9tA1sFFcxzqQ/edit?usp=sharing

Here is a description of the reaction in words:

magnesium sulfate + sodium carbonate  —-> magnesium carbonate + sodium sulfate

Reaction 2.

Put 5 grams of sodium hydrogen carbonate (baking soda) in a small flask. Put 100 grams of vinegar (5% acetic acid) in a beaker. Find the miss of the flask and baking soda, the beaker and vinegar, AND a dropper as pictured. Next add drops of vinegar to the flask. Observe what happens. Describe in words. Take pictures. Continue adding until the baking soda has disappeared and no more reaction is apparent. Be very careful no to spill any material. Add the vinegar slowly so no material bubbles or splashes out of the flask. Find the mass at the end of the reaction.

Enter your results in the class spreadsheet: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/1FPUcINAnYp8lzIQGBFd4dMElVeuZnXBipljpH9gRzgA/edit?usp=sharing

A description of the reaction:

Sodium hydrogen carbonate + acetic acid —>Sodium acetate + water + carbon dioxide

Be sure to record your observations, thoughts, and questions. Be thorough.

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3 October Science 7 Selecting partner trees

Today we will pick partner trees and finish the walk around the schoolyard. Keep your eyes open and listen closely to information about the campus trees. Notice things you have never noticed before! You will observe this tree throughout the rest of the year. You will become an expert on the species and maybe the genus and plant family, too. The individual specimen that is your partner tree will become your friend. You can and will tell each other secrets and be interested in the changes that take place during the year. Take pictures of the whole tree and the parts–leaves, branches, bark, flowers, fruits and seeds. Try to sprout some seeds if your tree has them. Make sketches. Make written observations. Write a poem about your tree. Take note of the animals that live in and on your tree–birds, insects, spiders, squirrels, etc. Write poems about your tree. Compose songs. Conduct scientific observations and research.

Some native trees:  suitabletreesdelhi

Compare the results of tree surveys by Sci 7 2015-2016s and 2016-2017

  1. 2016-17 Pd8: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/10Cn1AfKkJyn9sw6CqiqEKldKlSElFLnGuILofRyMm-s/edit?usp=sharing
  2. 2016-17 Pd6: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/110bXByMlkl6xHnX2nOhG8T1SJKmix273nlffkzCVfNk/edit?usp=sharing
  3. 2016-17 Pd5: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/10RdXmdn9v1838NjucBgUKcAR1SCu8o4YSyjeEUhIPRg/edit?usp=sharing
  4. 2015-16 Period8 treelistperiod8 or https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/1R3UemPGz8uowhkVtk43QhMRHLaIwWhMt4GyS2jsyaBc/edit?usp=sharing
  5. 2015-16 Period6  tree survey period6 or https://drive.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/file/d/0B4DPwlouN3dIeDdseWVUZEVWYTg/view?usp=sharing
  6. Tree list from FMO 2014-2015 school year (includes campus housing) Trees at AES 20142015 FMO

Things to observe about trees:

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27 Sept. Science 8 Atoms, Changes, Reading Reactions, etc., Conference, DSN

Today there are options for individual work–see below–options marked with ***:

***Continue watching this episode on Atoms. When you finish you may watch the episode on Change. You may get your own headphones or borrow them from Tech.

  1. Do this individually. Use headphones and refrain from conversation with other class members. Focus. This episode offers some important pieces of evidence for the Atomic Theory of Matter. Some examples come from “craft knowledge” and some come from the history of science.
  2. Turn on the captions.
  3. Watch one example straight through and replay if necessary–as many times as you need to get a sense of what the example is about. Write down what you think the “big ideas” and the “significant details” are. Record new words that you think are important. Record the questions you have. Move to the next example. These examples should be entered into your chart about evidence for the atomic theory. The episode adds an important new concept in our discussion–that of Energy. We dealt with this idea in an initial way in Science 7. This episode will help you deepen your understanding.
  4. Finish both episodes on your own if you do not finish during class.
  5. Be prepared for a quiz in the future on evidence and argument for the idea that matter is composed of atoms with properties and behaviors that explain what we observe about matter. Be ready to delve more deeply into the idea of energy.

***Atoms  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQ3mjb9BSaU

***Change  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nk8CQNThbc0

***Read the first 2 chapters of Peter Atkins Reactions. (Practice this reading strategy: Read passage of any length of your own choosing straight through. Write summary of passage without looking at text. Go back and read again. On the second reading look up and infer the meaning of the significant words you do not know. Record these words in your new vocabulary list. Add to the first summary. When you read, focus on what you DO understand rather than what you do not. Always try to identify main points, big ideas, significant details.

***Read with strategy above about the history of atomic theory in Joy Hakim’s Story of Science

  • Aristotle Leads the Way: Chapter 10
  • Newton at the Center: Chapter 19 and Chapter 20
  • Einstein Adds a New Dimension: Chapter 6 and Chapter 14

***Read with strategy above one of the Very Short Introductions on Elements, Materials, Molecules, The Periodic Table, Chemistry,

***Finish preparation of your Student-Parent-Teacher conference documentation

***Catch up on your Digital Science Notebook (all 7 items for every class we have had).

***Be sure to complete your document, presentation, or blog for the parent, student, teacher conference. Make sure it is shared with Dr. F and Parents. Practice.

*Begin making a plan for Parent-Student-Teacher conferences. (You can make a document or presentation in your DSN with the following. Include relevant live links. If you want to use your own AES blog, you may do so. Whatever you do, make sure your parents and I can access.)

a) Write a detailed reflection about the mixing of ethanol and water investigation and write-up. Describe the state of your knowledge about matter before our study began. Describe the state of your knowledge now. Which experiences and discussions seemed most useful? What concepts regarding matter do you feel you understand well? What concepts still seem a bit confusing?–Explain. Comment on what parts of your investigation seemed most “scientific” to you. Explain your comments.

b) So far in Science 8 what has been most interesting to you? What has been most puzzling? What has been most difficult? What has been most thought-provoking? Explain your answers.

c) Select your 3 best DSN entries. Highlight the links. Explain what they are about and why you think they are the best. 

d) Select the 3 pictures you have taken that best illustrate Science 8 and the level of your interest and participation.

e) Describe the most difficult idea you have encountered so far in Science 8. Why do you think it is most difficult?

f) Describe how you make sure your DSN is complete and up-to-date. To what extent do you think your DSN is complete and up-to-date.

g) Make a plan for your work in science for the rest of the semester. Be specific. (For example, how much use do you make of the reference links that are provided? How thorough are you in recording and learning to use new words? How frequently do you consult the class blog to see what we have done and where we are going? How often do you review and revise your DSN?)

h) Discuss your learning habits. Respectful, Responsible, Collaborative, Perseverant. 

 

 

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26 September, 2017 Science 7 PTS conf, Revisions of Tumble Buggy,Pulling cart graphs, upcoming motion ideas, partner trees and other longterm project

*Are you prepared for the parent teacher student conferences? A demonstration.

*Conditions for revision of the summative report on the Tumble Buggy:

  1.  A copy of the original submission must be unchanged and available in the DSN.
  2. The revised copy is submitted within the 2-week window (paper AND DSN).
  3. The revision makes use of 1) feedback on Powerschool, AND 2) in-person feedback from Dr. F.
  4. A document accompanies the revision (paper and DSN) explaining what changes were made and why. The reasons need to show a depth of understanding of the relevant scientific concepts and practices.

*Compare expected sketch graphs with actual graphs. Write an analysis / interpretation.

(Why do you think so many people expect something that is different from what actually happens? In what ways can the lessons from the backward bike contribute to this questions?)

  • Show pulling cart graphs.
  • Questions. Discussion.
  • Compare expected sketch graphs with actual graphs. Write an analysis / interpretation.

*Upcoming ideas–more on force and inertia–consider the case of rotational motion. Dropping objects of different mass at the same time. Momentum. Conservation of momentum. Pendulums and playground swings. Newton’s Laws taken all together. Air pressure water rockets. Explaining without words and numbers.

***Today–a preview of Science 7 work on the facts of biodiversity–all the kinds of living thing. Trees in the Schoolyard. Partner Tree project.

Take note, bookmark, save this page for future reference:

Today we will take a walk around the schoolyard. Key your eyes open and listen closely to information about the campus trees. Notice things you have never noticed before! We will have a lottery in which you will choose a “partner tree.” You will observe this tree throughout the rest of the year. You will become an expert on the species and maybe the genus and plant family, too. The individual specimen that is your partner tree will become your friend. You can and will tell each other secrets and be interested in the changes that take place during the year. Take pictures of the whole tree and the parts–leaves, branches, bark, flowers, fruits and seeds. Try to sprout some seeds if your tree has them. Make sketches. Make written observations. Write a poem about your tree. Take note of the animals that live in and on your tree–birds, insects, spiders, squirrels, etc. Write poems about your tree. Compose songs. Conduct scientific observations and research.

Some native trees:  suitabletreesdelhi

Tree surveys by Sci 7 2016-2017

Pd8: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/10Cn1AfKkJyn9sw6CqiqEKldKlSElFLnGuILofRyMm-s/edit?usp=sharing

Pd6: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/110bXByMlkl6xHnX2nOhG8T1SJKmix273nlffkzCVfNk/edit?usp=sharing

Pd5: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/10RdXmdn9v1838NjucBgUKcAR1SCu8o4YSyjeEUhIPRg/edit?usp=sharing

Tree surveys by Sci 7 2015-2016

  1. Period8 treelistperiod8 or https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/1R3UemPGz8uowhkVtk43QhMRHLaIwWhMt4GyS2jsyaBc/edit?usp=sharing
  2. Period6  tree survey period6 or https://drive.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/file/d/0B4DPwlouN3dIeDdseWVUZEVWYTg/view?usp=sharing
  3. Tree list from FMO 2014-2015 school year (includes campus housing) Trees at AES 20142015 FMO

Things to observe about trees:

notes

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25 September Science 8 ATOMS from Philip Morrison’s The Ring of Truth: An Inquiry into How We Know What We Know

You may get your headphones. If you need to borrow headphones from Dr. F, be sure you return them carefully untangled.

Read these obituaries of the author of the Ring of Truth: An Inquiry into How We Know What We Know

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/26/science/philip-morrison-89-builder-of-first-atom-bomb-dies.html?mcubz=1

http://web.mit.edu/physics/people/faculty/morrison_philip.html

Watch this episode on Atoms.

  1. Do this individually. Use headphones and refrain from conversation with other class members. Focus. This episode offers some important pieces of evidence for the Atomic Theory of Matter. Some examples come from “craft knowledge” and some come from the history of science.
  2. Turn on the captions.
  3. Watch one example straight through and replay if necessary–as many times as you need to get a sense of what the example is about. Write down what you think the “big ideas” and the “significant details” are. Record new words that you think are important. Record the questions you have. Move to the next example. These examples should be entered into your chart about evidence for the atomic theory.
  4. Finish the episode on your own if you do not finish during class.
  5. Be prepared for a quiz in the future on evidence and argument for the idea that matter is composed of atoms with properties and behaviors that explain what we observe about matter.

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22 September Science 7 Graphing the cart’s motion; reading about Newton’s ideas

Conditions for revision of the summative report on the Tumble Buggy.

  1.  A copy of the original submission must be unchanged and available in the DSN.
  2. The revised copy is submitted within the 2-week window (paper AND DSN).
  3. The revision makes use of 1) feedback on Powerschool, AND 2) in-person feedback from Dr. F.
  4. A document accompanies the revision (paper and DSN) explaining what changes were made and why. The reasons need to show a depth of understanding of the relevant scientific concepts and practices.

Period 1

https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/1-9QqpG8UTP09r26h-5t3pjUQLHRiKJMUhYgYuOvu0Cc/edit?usp=sharing

  • Using the graphing guidelines, plot distance versus time for the single push, the 8-pound constant force pull, and the 12-pound constant force pull.
  • Use medians (the value half-way between the two measurements).
  • Work in pencil only.
  • Use the same scale for all three and plot on the same graph.
  • Label axes first.
  • Select scale that includes all data, that is convenient (1 square = 1,2,5, etc.) and consistent, that covers at least 1/2 the page. If you use the 1 cm square graph paper, you may need to orient the paper as portrait.
  • You do not connect the points, dot to dot. Instead sketch a smooth curve that comes as close to all the points as possible. A bendable ruler can help or a steady hand and eye.
  • Write out an interpretation of these three situations.

Period 3

https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/14fRKwGUtuvM21j7hBPIU9Pqy65F6ZIepdWMltfQ_T58/edit?usp=sharing

  • Using the graphing guidelines, plot distance versus time for the single push, the 10-pound constant force pull, and the 12-pound constant force pull.
  • Use medians (the value half-way between the two measurements).
  • Work in pencil only.
  • Use the same scale for all three and plot on the same graph.
  • Label axes first.
  • Select scale that includes all data, that is convenient (1 square = 1,2,5, etc.) and consistent, that covers at least 1/2 the page. If you use the 1 cm square graph paper, you may need to orient the paper as portrait.
  • You do not connect the points, dot to dot. Instead sketch a smooth curve that comes as close to all the points as possible. A bendable ruler can help or a steady hand and eye.
  • Write out an interpretation of these three situations.

Form groups as follows:

Period 1

  • Michal, Tomas, Chihaya
  • Anton, Avanka, DoWoo
  • Boris, Jaehun, YeonWoo
  • Yaroslav, Denzel
  • Pauline, Bailey, Heejun

Period 3

  • Liam, Max, YuBin, HanGyeol
  • Oscar, Gabi, JaeJun, Merrick
  • Marvin, JiWoo, Sophie, JaeHa
  • Hae Yoon, Reyna, Halen, YuMin
  • David, Ananya, Sulaimaan, Rotem

Collaboratively, read the chapter “Newton Moves” from Joy Hakim’s Story of Science: Newton at the Center. Do not keep or mark on the printed copy. Return at the end of class.

Follow this method:

Each person in the group read a paragraph silently. Then each student in her or his own words states the most important idea from the paragraph. A designated student poses a question for discussion to the group. The group then discusses. A written record is kept and shared of the important ideas, the questions and discussion. Do this for each paragraph and rotate the student who poses the question. Do not talk out of turn. Each student participates. If a point arises where the entire group is uncertain, please make a note and try to locate the source of the uncertainty. Each student should add to her or his new word list as new terms emerge. Follow this protocol for the captions and sidebars.

Be sure to include the record of your discussion in today DSN entry. Also be sure to reflect on the new ideas and experiences as they relate to your growing understanding of the science of motion.

Bill Nye Motion https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pjyW64bpHf0

Bill Nye Time https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uloOt03wZDs

Bill Nye Momentum https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gkeQiNSgVpY

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21 September Science 8 Turn in Summative Reports on Ethanol and Water mixing; some astronomy observations

Today:

Turn in summative assessment reports on mixing ethanol and water.

If you do not have the report ready, immediately email your parents and me in the same message. Explain that you have not completed the assessment project by the due date. Predict when it will be complete and submitted. Acknowledge that you understand that it is a major assignment.

While you are waiting and whenever we have time during class, read the rest of the blog post, explore the links and ideas, work on your digital science notebook, and continue to prepare your document/presentation for the student-parent-teacher conference.

When everyone has had a chance to submit, we will go outside for some observations. Have your compass app and your angle measuring app downloaded and ready to use. Have an aerial photo / map of the school and neighborhood bookmarked. Save an image. Do the same for your residence and neighborhood. Orient your mental map of both the school and your home/neighborhood–north, south, east, west.

Below are some important terms and ideas. Today’s DSN entry should go in the astronomy folder. In addition you should start a “Sky sightings” list (document or folder) in the astronomy folder of your DSN. For each sighting include your location, the time, the date, the direction you are looking (bearing), the angle of elevation, appearance / phase, and other observations. The goal of keeping this sky-watching journal is to become familiar with local astronomical phenomena to the point you will be able to develop explanations and will be able to appreciate the history of astronomical observations and explanations up to our time.

  • Plate and gnomon sundial
  • Universal sundial
  • Bearing
  • Azimuth
  • Angle of elevation
  • Altitude (angle)
  • Zenith
  • Nadir
  • Equinox (Autumnal / Vernal)
  • Notice the date https://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/autumnal-equinox.html
  • Ecliptic
  • Celestial longitude
  • Terrestrial longitude
  • Latitude
  • Great circle
  • Apparent (motion)
  • Sunset
  • Sunrise
  • What do you know about shadows?
  • What do you know about perspective?
  • What do you know about triangles?
  • What do you know about parallax?
  • What do you know about indirect measurement?
  • History of science–How can the use of astronomical words from Arabic be explained?

Browse the following websites:

A useful video

18 September at sunset–notice the direction the sun is setting:

 

 

Download a free compass app. Find out how it works. Use it with a map to find out how the school is oriented. Do the same with your home. Does the IPAD compass show magnetic north or true north or both. What is the difference? Also download an angle measuring device–sometimes called a clinometer. Figure out how it works and become competent in using it. Practice.

Begin watching the sun. Where along the horizon does it rise? What time? What time is it highest in the sky? When it is highest in the sky, which way does the shadow point? What happens to the length of the shadow from day to day? Watch along the horizon which way the sun sets? In Delhi, when is the sun directly over your head (so that you would have no shadow)?

The moon is now in the “waning crescent” phase. By October 6 it will be full. Begin watching for the moon. Look for it in the sky when you come to school. Look for it in the afternoon and evening. Look for it during the day. Look for it during the night. When you see it, note the time, the date, the phase, the orientation in the sky, the direction along the horizon you must face to see the moon (we can call this bearing), and the angle you must tilt your gaze upward to see the moon (we can call this angle of elevation).

Put your observations in a “Sky sightings” in the astronomy folder of your DSN. For each sighting include your location, the time, the date, the direction you are looking (bearing), the angle of elevation, appearance / phase, and other observations. The goal of keeping this sky-watching journal is to become familiar with local astronomical phenomena to the point you will be able to develop explanations and will be able to appreciate the history of astronomical observations and explanations up to our time.

When do you think the picture above was taken? Explain your reasoning.

Picture taken at sunset on 2 September, 2017. Notice the sunspots. See this http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=138692

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20 September Science 7 Pulling a cart with a constant force

Reminder: Keep DSN complete and up-to-date

Discuss expectations and reasons of what happens to a cart when pulled with a constant force.

Set up frame of reference (track) and conduct several motion events with cart.

Gather data.

Make graphs of data.

Analyze results–especially in light of expectations.

Newton’s ideas about inertia and force. These ideas may be quite different from the way you have developed for thinking about motion.

Look at the questions printed and posted on the cabinets–points for reflection.

Prepare for Student-Parent-Teacher conference.

See feedback on Tumble Buggy Reports in Powerschool. If you want to revise and resubmit, you have 2 weeks from today. You can use the feedback to help you revise. You should also consult with Dr. F.

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