26 September Science 8 Parent Student Teacher conferences; peek at Astronomy unit; moon journal

a. Mindful moment.

This morning at about 6:15 Indian Standard Time. E 9/15 Vasant Vihar, New Delhi. Looking a few degrees south of due west. (Note: The photo of the sun on the current blog header was taken a few days before the autumnal equinox just before sunset looking in the same general direction.)

b. Review previous DSN entry–your project report. Did you follow the guidelines? What feedback do you expect to receive? Why?

c. Preview today’s blogpost.

d. Create today’s DSN entry/document.

e. Questions. Are you prepared for Parent Student Teacher conferences?

  • * * * * *
  1. Make a new folder inside your DSN. Name it Astronomy. Put today’s DSN in this folder. We are opening the astronomy unit to give you time to begin watching the sky. You will have an opportunity during WOW 8 by being outside during the day and the night to make observations. You should know what to look for and how to look.
  2. Inside the Astronomy folder, make another document. Call it Moon Journal. You will need to make repeated observations of the moon–your location, the time you see the moon, the date, the moon’s location in the sky (bearing and elevation), and the moon’s phase. You will need to make a sufficient number of observations during two cycles so that you can begin to explain what the moon does and why it appears to us as it does.
  3. We will discuss today–naming/observing directions along the horizon (bearing / azimuth) and describing/measuring angular elevation/altitude above the horizon. We’ll use your compass app. (Try to find out how it works.) And we’ll use your app to measure angles. (How do you think it works?) The concepts of horizon, celestial meridian, local noon, zenith, celestial sphere, celestial equator, ecliptic are important.
  4. We will look at two sundials: horizontal and universal. We will discuss how they work.
  5. We will talk about the apparent motion of the sun and the moon.
  6. We will discuss the challenge of reconciling what we see from our position on the earth with “explanatory” views that try to offer a view of the earth-moon-sun system and the solar system that we never experience. Changing points of view is a difficulty that many students face.
  7. We will discuss the importance of using properties of triangles and circles to indirectly measures sizes and distances in the solar system.
  8. We will take measurements of the tall kapok tree in the terrace between the m.s. rocks and the Tiger’s Den and use a carefully made scale drawing to determine its height. See diagram on board. This method uses properties of similar triangles.
  9. See the accomplishments of Eratosthenes on calculating the size of the earth in Egypt around 200 B.C.E.
  10. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eratosthenes#Measurement_of_the_Earth’s_circumference
  11. Start at 9:27 for a modern recreation of Eratosthenes’ method to figure out the size of the earth. (This is a great video on mapping from The Ring of Truth. I hope you have watched the episode linked on a previous blogpost on Atoms.) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRY2SkMTafc
  12. See the accomplishments of Aristarchus in attempting to figure out the sizes and distances of the sun and moon in the 3rd century B.C.E. http://astrosun2.astro.cornell.edu/academics/courses/astro201/aristarchus.htm

Watch this video–it is pretty good. Keep it with your references, like:

https://www.timeanddate.com/moon/india/new-delhi

https://www.timeanddate.com/moon/phases/india/new-delhi

https://www.timeanddate.com/sun/india/new-delhi

https://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/seasons.html?n=176

https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en/solar-activity

 

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25 September Science 7 Parent Conferences; New topic for long-term observations; Relative motion; Acceleration

a. Mindful moment.

b. Review previous entry in DSN. Tumble Buggy report. Did you use the guidelines? I have noticed a few students calculate time/distance instead of distance / time. Some students did not include graphs. You will get feedback on your project as soon as possible.

Reminder:

Digital Science Notebook (DSN) 

An entry is needed for every class  

The purpose of the DSN is to help you:

  • Remember
  • Think
  • Learn
  • The entry should be dated and titled. Follow guidelines for organizing entries in topic folders AND for naming files. An entry should be completed by the beginning of the next class.
  • Each entry should include sentences, data and images. Use the next seven items as a checklist for completeness:
  1. Normal notes you would take. Information from the board, introductory instructions, etc. Special writing tasks.
  2. What you/we did
  3. What you/we saw
  4. What you/we talked about
  5. A sketch that will help you remember and think about something significant from the class. (It could be a sketch of a thing, a process, or an idea.)
  6. A photo that will help you remember and think about something significant from the class. (A photo different from a photo of notes on the board.)
  7. What you think and wonder regarding 1,2,3, 4,5, and 6 above. What are your questions, ideas and reflections? (You can write about what is significant in the sketch and photo. You can be creative, too. Try a poem or essay from time to time.)

c. Preview today’s blogpost.

d. Create DSN entry for today.

e. Questions. Is everyone ready for the Parent-Student-Teacher conferences?

  • * * * *
  1. *Class newsletter for parents. (Everyone will have responsibility at some time during the year). 3 volunteers. If no volunteers, will draw names randomly. There will be a deadline you must meet.
  2. We will check the weather before class. If it is not raining, we will take a tree walk around the campus. No today, but soon, you will select an individual tree to be your “partner tree” for the year. You will make repeated observations over a long period of time. You will need to keep a kind of partner tree diary. You will learn all you can about the species. More on this later. Today is an introduction to help you start becoming familiar with the natural landscape of the campus. This awareness of your surroundings will be important for WOW 7, too.

In case there is rain, we will carry out activities 3 and/or 4 (below).

Examine the following to begin “growing” your appreciation for trees. Begin curing yourself of “tree blindness.”

3. Make a new group of 3. These should be students you have not worked with before (or have worked with the fewest number of times). Update your collaboration chart / document. Names, topics, activities, dates, links (relevant blogposts, DSN entries, group documents and data)

You will receive a pullback car. Explore its operation. Do not overstretch the spring, but do find the point that gives maximum acceleration and distance.

Design a track (frame of reference) to evaluate how the speed changes. This will be very similar to your tumble buggy procedure. Find the times to reach various distances. Make a distance vs. time graph to display your results. Calculate the average speed for zero meters to the maximum distance you measure. Can you find average speeds for other segments, like from 0-1, 1-2, and 2-3? Be prepared to share your findings with the rest of the class.

4. We shall watch and discuss in detail the motion examples presented in: Frames of Reference < https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bJMYoj4hHqU >. What is your understanding of the statement, “All motion is relative.”

 

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24 September Science 8 turn in summative projects; prepare for Parent-Student-Teacher projects; Summative commentary/reflection

  1. Mindful moment. The seasons turn. Harvest moon.
  2. Review previous DSN entry. This should be your summative report on mixing ethanol and water.
  3. Preview blogpost for today.
  4. Open new document for DSN entry. Give it the Title: Parent Student Teacher conference.
  5. Questions.
  • * * * * *

Turn in Summative report on Mixing Ethanol and Water. If you are not prepared to turn in the paper and/or do not have the report uploaded and labeled in your DSN, please send an email to your parents (copy me) explaining that you have not completed a summative project, that you had class time to work on the project, that you were well aware of the due date. Predict when you will turn in the project.

Either in your DSN entry for today or in a document that you link to your DSN entry, respond to the following. You may include links to examples. This page or document can serve as a kind of index so that you can find items quickly. This is recommended rather than a slide presentation. We will try to have a conversation with you, your parents, and me about your year so far in science. You will provide the points of conversation and the examples (see below).

Have the following items ready to show and discuss.

  1. What has been the most interesting part of Science for you so far this year? Why would you say it is the most interesting?
  2. What has been most surprising? Explain.
  3. What has been most puzzling? Explain.
  4. Describe your level of engagement in Science so far this year. Provide examples where you have shown initiative and effort to get involved in learning. What do you think motivates you (or would motivate you) to have sustained engagement in Science?
  5. What do you feel is the most important idea/concept you have learned so far this year? Explain why you think it is most important. Provide an example of your work/thinking related to your answer (an entry from your DSN).
  6. What do you feel is the most important scientific practice you have learned so far this year? Explain why you think it is most important. Provide an example of your work/thinking related to your answer (an entry from your DSN).
  7. What has been the most challenging concept you have encountered so far this year? What makes it most challenging? What has your response been to this challenge? Show an example of how you have dealt with the challenge.
  8. What has been the most challenging scientific practice you have encountered so far this year? What makes it most challenging? What has your response been to this challenge? Show an example of how you have dealt with the challenge.
  9. Show your three best DSN entries so far this year. What do you think makes them your best? Comment on your DSN overall. How do you decide what picture to take and what sketch to make? How much time do you spend? What could you do to make the digital science notebook an important part of your learning in science?
  10. Show your summative report. Explain your thinking. What was the most challenging part of the project? Why do you think it was most challenging?
  11. What do you feel is most helpful for your learning in Science? What learning goals do you have for the rest of the year in Science? Explain how you chose these goals? What will you try to do to meet these goals? What kind of support do you need to help you meet these goals? How will you assess your success at meeting these goals?

Commentary / Reflection on the Mixing Ethanol and Water report.

Write a thoughtful and thorough commentary on your learning as a result of the year so far in Science 8. Specifically talk about both the ideas/concepts about matter and the scientific practices you have learned about and used in your investigation of mixing ethanol and water. To what extent do you feel your knowledge and skills in the science of matter are growing? Explain and elaborate.

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21 September Science 7 Turn in Tumble Buggy–Summative Reports; Write reflection; Prepare for Parent-Student-Teacher Conferences

1. Mindful moment.

(See this article and video from a school in Chicago, Illinois, United States where a classroom uses mindfulness techniques

http://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/arlington-heights/news/ct-ahp-olive-school-student-meditation-tl-1109-20171107-story.html 

http://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/arlington-heights/news/ct-ahp-olive-school-student-meditation-tl-1109-20171107-story.html )

2. Review DSN from last class. Should be the draft of your report.

3. Preview Blogpost for the day.

4. Create DSN entry for today. You will have 3 tasks today. Two of them should be written in your DSN. You can use sketch(es) and photo(s) to illustrate any of your points. You will be writing about what you have done and seen so far this year. And you will be writing about our discussions and presentations. Both of the two tasks involve reflection.

5. Questions.

  • * * * *

Task 1. Turn in paper copy of Tumble Buggy Summative report when you are called. Check for digital copy in your DSN. If you do not have your report, you will need to write an email to your parents (with cc: to Dr. F) explaining that your summative project is not ready. Explain that you were given class time to work on it. Explain what difficulties you have had in completing it and what efforts you made to overcome the difficulties. Predict a specific time when you will turn in the late project.

Task 2. Write a detailed reflection about the tumble buggy investigation and write-up. See below.

Task 3. Prepare for Parent-Student-Teacher conferences. See below.

  • * * * * *

Task 2. Write a detailed reflection about the tumble buggy investigation and write-up.

  • Describe the state of your knowledge about motion before our study began.
  • Describe the state of your knowledge now.
  • Which experiences and discussions seemed most useful?
  • What concepts do you feel you understand well?
  • What concepts still seem a bit confusing?–Explain.
  • Describe what is meant by average speed.
  • Why do you think the term average is used?
  • Name a situation in which you traveled at a constant speed.
  • Describe your knowledge and skill with making distance vs. time graphs.
  • Comment on what parts of your investigation seemed most “scientific” to you. Explain your comments.

* * * * *

Task 3. Getting ready for Parent Student Teacher conferences:

Have the following items ready to show and discuss.

  1. What has been the most interesting part of Science for you so far this year? Why would you say it is the most interesting?
  2. What has been most surprising? Explain.
  3. What has been most puzzling? Explain.
  4. Describe your level of engagement in Science so far this year. Provide examples where you have shown initiative and effort to get involved in learning. What do you think motivates you (or would motivate you) to have sustained engagement in Science?
  5. What do you feel is the most important idea/concept you have learned so far this year? Explain why you think it is most important. Provide an example of your work/thinking related to your answer (an entry from your DSN).
  6. What do you feel is the most important scientific practice you have learned so far this year? Explain why you think it is most important. Provide an example of your work/thinking related to your answer (an entry from your DSN).
  7. What has been the most challenging concept you have encountered so far this year? What makes it most challenging? What has your response been to this challenge? Show an example of how you have dealt with the challenge.
  8. What has been the most challenging scientific practice you have encountered so far this year? What makes it most challenging? What has your response been to this challenge? Show an example of how you have dealt with the challenge.
  9. Show your three best DSN entries so far this year. What do you think makes them your best? Comment on your DSN overall. How do you decide what picture to take and what sketch to make? How much time do you spend? What could you do to make the digital science notebook an important part of your learning in science?
  10. Show your summative report. Explain your thinking. What was the most challenging part of the project? Why do you think it was most challenging?
  11. What do you feel is most helpful for your learning in Science? What learning goals do you have for the rest of the year in Science? Explain how you chose these goals? What will you try to do to meet these goals? What kind of support do you need to help you meet these goals? How will you assess your success at meeting these goals?
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20 Sept. Science 8 Workday on report for Summative Project–Mixing Ethanol and Water

  1. Mindful moment.
  2. Review recent DSN entry–the draft of your project report.
  3. Preview blogpost for today.
  4. Create DSN entry for today. All you need to do is add a link to your summative project report.
  5. Questions.
  • * * * * *

Check out your salt crystals.

Carefully look at those that seem to be floating. How do you think that happens? Can you get a picture of the floating layer?

  • * * * *

Use class today to write/finish your report.

Pay close attention to the guidelines. Ask if you are uncertain about the format and style. The report will be due at the beginning of class on Monday 24 September. You will need a paper copy and a digital copy properly uploaded and labeled in your DSN.

Format:

Title An Investigation of phenomena associated with the mixing of water and ethanol

Background

Describe study of matter up to this point. Describe original demonstration and your attempt to replicate. Describe class data. 

Question(s) What is a possible explanation for the volume that results from mixing 50 ml water with 50 ml ethanol?

Expectation(s)

Describe the possible explanation. Describe the consequences that follow if the explanation is true.

Procedure

Describe everything you did in order to test your explanation. Describe the logic of your test. Describe any measurements. Describe how the data were analyzed. Do NOT present any data. You may include photos to illustrate your procedure(s).

Results

Present all data in an organized fashion. Use tables and graphs where appropriate. If you have photos that show results, you may present them here.

Analysis

Explain how the results support or challenge (rule out) the possible explanation. Cite specific data to back up your claim. Spell out your argument carefully. How does the idea of particles (atoms and molecules) play a role in your analysis?

Conclusion

Summarize briefly the findings for part one. Raise the question that you will consider for part 2.

Background for part 2.

Question(s) for part 2.

Expectation(s) for part 2.

Procedure(s) for part 2.

Results for part 2.

Analysis for part 2.

Conclusion for parts 1 and 2 combined and integrated.

What have you learned about matter? Relevance of ideas about particles (atoms and molecules) What questions do you now have? Other things you might like to try and why?

You may cite the report below. You may use the report for inspiration on how to write a scientific report. Note: It is missing the conclusion. DO NOT try to copy the report or use it as a template. Follow the guidelines above.

Blogpost for 14 September: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2018/09/13/14-september-science-8-summative-investigation-project-mixing-ethanol-and-water/

Blogpost for 12 September: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2018/09/12/12-sept-science-8-summative-project-what-happens-when-ethanol-is-mixed-with-water/

Blogpost for 10 September: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2018/09/09/10-sept-science-8-beginning-summative-project-1-for-the-study-of-matter/

* * * * *

See this email sent yesterday to all my Science 8 students:

Dear Science 8 students,

One of our units this year is on Astronomy. This coming week, there are two celestial events you should watch–the Autumnal Equinox on 23 September and the full moon (Harvest Moon) on 25 September. 

Download a compass app on your ipad. Choose a free one. Choose on that is easy to operate. Explore its use and find out how it works. Also download an angle measuring app, sometimes called a clinometer. 

Observations to make when locating objects in the sky: Bearing–what compass direction must one look in order to see the object of interest. Elevation–at what angle must one tilt the line of sight to see the object? Date. Time. Location. Conditions.

Useful term: Celestial meridian. The imaginary line running north and south directly across the sky overhead. The term a.m. means ante-meridian. The term p.m. means post-meridian. Ante= before. Post = after.

Make sure you can use a map app, too.  

  • On 23 Sept. observe where the sun rises on your horizon. Check the direction with your compass app. Do the same for the setting direction. Note the time for rising AND the time for setting. How many hours are there between the rising time and the setting time. What do you expect in 1 month? in 2 months? in 3 months? 
  • Notice the directions and times on this solar calculator: https://www.timeanddate.com/sun/india/new-delhi
  • Equinox comes from words that mean “equal night.” Why do you think the day has that name? There is an equinox in the fall and one in the spring. How might that be explained?
  • Take pictures at your location showing the sun and your location.
  • Look at the data on this moon calculator. 
  • Notice that the moon is full on 25 Sept. Notice the rising time. 
  • The full moon is directly opposite the sun, with the earth in the middle, when the moon is full. 
  • Thus, the full moon always rises when the sun sets. 
  • What time does the moon rise on 26 Sept. What about 27? What about 28? What about 29? 
  • What happens to the phase as time passes? How do you think the phase is related to the rising and setting times for the moon?
  • When can you see the moon in the day time? What phases can the moon be in when you see it in mid-morning? in mid-afternoon? 
  • When you are observing the moon, always notice the position of the sun. Point at the moon with one hand and at the sun with the other. What is the relation between the angle your arms make with your body and the phase of the moon? 
  • On what days might we see the moon in the sky while we are at school?
  • https://www.timeanddate.com/moon/india/new-delhi
  • Take pictures at your location showing the moon and your location.

This is a very useful website. Become familiar with it.

https://www.timeanddate.com/astronomy/

Happy sky watching,

Dr.F

  • * * * * *

Getting ready for Parent Student Teacher conferences:

Have the following items ready to show and discuss.

  1. What has been the most interesting part of Science for you so far this year? Why would you say it is the most interesting?
  2. What has been most surprising? Explain.
  3. What has been most puzzling? Explain.
  4. Describe your level of engagement in Science so far this year. Provide examples where you have shown initiative and effort to get involved in learning. What do you think motivates you (or would motivate you) to have sustained engagement in Science?
  5. What do you feel is the most important idea/concept you have learned so far this year? Explain why you think it is most important. Provide an example of your work/thinking related to your answer (an entry from your DSN).
  6. What do you feel is the most important scientific practice you have learned so far this year? Explain why you think it is most important. Provide an example of your work/thinking related to your answer (an entry from your DSN).
  7. What has been the most challenging concept you have encountered so far this year? What makes it most challenging? What has your response been to this challenge? Show an example of how you have dealt with the challenge.
  8. What has been the most challenging scientific practice you have encountered so far this year? What makes it most challenging? What has your response been to this challenge? Show an example of how you have dealt with the challenge.
  9. Show your three best DSN entries so far this year. What do you think makes them your best? Comment on your DSN overall. How do you decide what picture to take and what sketch to make? How much time do you spend? What could you do to make the digital science notebook an important part of your learning in science?
  10. Show your summative report. Explain your thinking. What was the most challenging part of the project? Why do you think it was most challenging?
  11. What do you feel is most helpful for your learning in Science? What learning goals do you have for the rest of the year in Science? Explain how you chose these goals? What will you try to do to meet these goals? What kind of support do you need to help you meet these goals? How will you assess your success at meeting these goals?
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19 September Science 7 Workday: Writing the report on the Tumble Buggy investigation

  1. Mindful moment. “Every time we become aware of a thought, as opposed to being lost in a thought, we experience that opening of the mind.”
    – Joseph Goldstein
  2. Review your DSN entry from the previous class. This should be the draft of your Tumble Buggy investigation report.
  3. Preview the blogpost for today.
  4. Create a DSN entry for today. This is the draft of your Tumble Buggy investigation report.
  5. Questions.
  • * * * * *

You may spend this class period composing the report on your Tumble Buggy investigation. Follow the following format and guidelines. Ask for help if you need it. This report is due in hard copy and digital copy in your DSN at the beginning of class on 21 September.

  • Title – Clearly stating what the experiment is about
  • Background – What have you learned about motion before this assessment project? Describe experiences and new knowledge. Mention learning about how to measure motion, how to analyze data
  • Question (expressed in a clear form)
  • Expected answer – (before doing the experiment) and why you expected that answer to the question?
  • Methods or Procedures (written in 1st/3rd person and past tense; not written as commands)
  1. How was data acquired

Remember that you have two sub-questions. One is about the speed. The other is about the direction. You have different procedures for each question.

2. How was data analyzed (graphs and calculations)

  • Results
  1. Table of results (organized and labeled)
  2. Calculations with correct units.
  3. Appropriate, well-made graphs
  4. Photos
  5. Anecdotal observations.
  • Analysis or Interpretation

Relate results to question. How do your results relate to what you expected? Use evidence from your data to support claim of what the speed of the Tumble Buggy is and whether it is constant. Use evidence to support claim about how straight the direction of travel is. Refer to scientific concepts relevant to the problems that we have discussed in class. Discuss the size of any variation in results and factors contributing to it.

  • Conclusion Summary and New Questions

Summarize results, suggest new questions and propose new experiments to investigate the tumble buggy and its velocity (speed and direction), motion, and performance.

Meeting—Includes details of practice and reasoning. Makes accurate measurements. Constructs correct graphs and makes correct calculations (including units). Demonstrates understanding of techniques for acquiring and analyzing data relevant to motion. Demonstrates understanding of the concept of average speed.

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18 September Science 8 Workday–Summative project–Mixing Ethanol and Water

  1. Mindful moment. Engagement. Initiative. Choice. Building new reasoning pathways.
  2. Review recent blogposts.  4,6,10,12,14 Sept. Send an email to your parents and to Dr. F describing the following:
  • a) How many of the recent 5 dates have an entry in your DSN?
  • b) How many of the recent 5 entries have ALL 7 items included in sufficient detail?
  • c) What items are missing or are inadequately covered?
  • d) How much time you spend outside of class keeping your DSN complete and up-to-date?

3. Preview today’s blogpost.

4. Create entry for today. Today’s entry may be a document that you use for the draft of your summative report.

5. Questions.

  • * * * *

Examine the salt-water evaporation experiment. See the precipitated crystals of NaCl (table salt). Notice their form. Take pictures. Make sketches. KIV (keep in view) as we continue to delve further into The Atomic-Molecular Theory of Matter right after the summative project. How might dissolving, solubility, crystallization, precipitation of a solute from a solution (like the salt in the picture above), and crystal form (notice the cubic shapes of the salt crystals) relate to the explanation of the behavior and properties of matter in terms of particles (atoms-molecules)?

Use class today and Thursday to write your report. Pay close attention to the guidelines. Ask if you are uncertain about the format and style. The report will be due at the beginning of class on Monday 24 September. You will need a paper copy and a digital copy properly uploaded and labeled in your DSN.

Format:

Title An Investigation of phenomena associated with the mixing of water and ethanol

Background

Describe study of matter up to this point. Describe original demonstration and your attempt to replicate. Describe class data. 

Question(s) What is a possible explanation for the volume that results from mixing 50 ml water with 50 ml ethanol?

Expectation(s)

Describe the possible explanation. Describe the consequences that follow if the explanation is true.

Procedure

Describe everything you did in order to test your explanation. Describe the logic of your test. Describe any measurements. Describe how the data were analyzed. Do NOT present any data. You may include photos to illustrate your procedure(s).

Results

Present all data in an organized fashion. Use tables and graphs where appropriate. If you have photos that show results, you may present them here.

Analysis

Explain how the results support or challenge (rule out) the possible explanation. Cite specific data to back up your claim. Spell out your argument carefully. How does the idea of particles (atoms and molecules) play a role in your analysis?

Conclusion

Summarize briefly the findings for part one. Raise the question that you will consider for part 2.

Background for part 2.

Question(s) for part 2.

Expectation(s) for part 2.

Procedure(s) for part 2.

Results for part 2.

Analysis for part 2.

Conclusion for parts 1 and 2 combined and integrated.

What have you learned about matter? Relevance of ideas about particles (atoms and molecules) What questions do you now have? Other things you might like to try and why?

You may cite the report below. You may use the report for inspiration on how to write a scientific report. Note: It is missing the conclusion. DO NOT try to copy the report or use it as a template. Follow the guidelines above.

Blogpost for 14 September: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2018/09/13/14-september-science-8-summative-investigation-project-mixing-ethanol-and-water/

Blogpost for 12 September: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2018/09/12/12-sept-science-8-summative-project-what-happens-when-ethanol-is-mixed-with-water/

Blogpost for 10 September: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2018/09/09/10-sept-science-8-beginning-summative-project-1-for-the-study-of-matter/

 

 

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17 Sept. Science 7 Workday for Report on Summative project: To what extent does the Tumble Buggy exhibit constant speed?

  1. Mindful moment.
  2. Review previous blogposts. Send email to parents and Dr. F indicating which class dates have entries for the previous 5 classes (two weeks). Indicate which dates have all 7 items addressed. Indicate what is missing. Indicate accurately how much time you spend outside of class making your DSN complete and bringing it up-to-date. See this very cool sketch from a 7th grader’s DSN. What was this student trying to remember and convey?
  3. Preview todays blog.
  4. Create entry for today.
  5. Questions.
  • * * * * *

You may spend this class period composing the report on your Tumble Buggy investigation. Follow the following format and guidelines. Ask for help if you need it. This report is due in hard copy and digital copy in your DSN at the beginning of class on 19 September.

  • Title – Clearly stating what the experiment is about
  • Background – What have you learned about motion before this assessment project? Describe experiences and new knowledge. Mention learning about how to measure motion, how to analyze data
  • Question (expressed in a clear form)
  • Expected answer – (before doing the experiment) and why you expected that answer to the question?
  • Methods or Procedures (written in 1st/3rd person and past tense; not written as commands)
  1. How was data acquired
  2. How was data analyzed (graphs and calculations)
  • Results
  1. Table of results (organized and labeled)
  2. Calculations with correct units.
  3. Appropriate, well-made graphs
  4. Photos
  5. Anecdotal observations.
  • Analysis or Interpretation

Relate results to question. How do your results relate to what you expected? Use evidence from your data to support claim of what the speed of the Tumble Buggy is and whether it is constant. Use evidence to support claim about how straight the direction of travel is. Refer to scientific concepts relevant to the problems that we have discussed in class. Discuss the size of any variation in results and factors contributing to it.

  • Conclusion Summary and New Questions

Summarize results, suggest new questions and propose new experiments to investigate the tumble buggy and its velocity (speed and direction), motion, and performance.

Meeting—Includes details of practice and reasoning. Makes accurate measurements. Constructs correct graphs and makes correct calculations (including units). Demonstrates understanding of techniques for acquiring and analyzing data relevant to motion. Demonstrates understanding of the concept of average speed.

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14 September Science 8 Summative investigation project–Mixing Ethanol and Water

  1. Mindful moment.
  2. Review of previous DSN entries. You should have described the original demonstration, your attempt to replicate it, and the patterns observed in the class data. You should have developed or selected an explanation of the vanishing volume and possibly other observations (temperature increase, bubbles, mixing lines). You should have developed and conducted a test of the explanation. The results of the test should either support or challenge the explanation. Perhaps you tested an idea that was part of the explanation you were considering. Write about the outcome and talk with me.
  3. Preview today’s blogpost.
  4. Create a DSN entry for today. What photo will you take? What sketch will you make? (A sketch of your explanation at the atomic-molecular level would be perfect.)
  5. Questions.
  • * * * * *

Blogpost for 14 September: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2018/09/13/14-september-science-8-summative-investigation-project-mixing-ethanol-and-water/

Blogpost for 12 September: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2018/09/12/12-sept-science-8-summative-project-what-happens-when-ethanol-is-mixed-with-water/

Blogpost for 10 September: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2018/09/09/10-sept-science-8-beginning-summative-project-1-for-the-study-of-matter/

If you have finished part 1 of the project (replicating the demonstration, developing and testing an explanation for the vanishing volume, etc.), you may propose a line of investigation that you find interesting about any aspect of the phenomenon of mixing ethanol and water. Please check in with Dr. F before you try anything.

There are many things to try. Open your mind to something you have become curious about.

See: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2018/09/05/science-8-an-interesting-problem/

 

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13 September Science 7 Continuing Summative Project–Tumble Buggy: To what extent does it exhibit constant velocity?

  1. Mindful moment.
  2. Review DSN entry from previous class. You should have data. Graph. Calculations of average speeds for different distance intervals. You should have a description of what you did to gather the data.
  3. Review today’s blogpost.
  4. Create new DSN entry for today.
  5. Questions.

Today is a work day to continue gathering data on the extent to which your tumble buggy exhibits constant velocity. Organize your data. Analyze your data. Ask if you have questions.

Begin thinking about what you will show and say about your science learning at parent conferences. By now you should be making the effort to have complete and up-to-date digital science notebook entries. If you are finding it difficult, you should see me.

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