27 April Science 7 Student Survey; Predator-Prey game/simulation

Complete student survey:

See board for login and ID#. Dr. F will read directions first.

Please remain quiet and seated until everyone finished. Work on the graph and questions on the board. Examine and read the following links:

Predator Prey

Consider this Inuit saying, “The wolf and the caribou are one. The caribou feeds the wolf; and the wolf keeps the caribou strong.”

<http://www.arctic.uoguelph.ca/cpl/Traditional/myth/wolf.htm>

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26 April Science 8 Student Survey; Prepare for Activity/Discussion

Complete student survey:

See board for login and ID#. Dr. F will read directions first.

Work on plan for activity and discussion–turn in outline for plan with times noted. Be sure you do a practice run to verify the planned timings. Total time available = 25 minutes. List the date and order when you are scheduled. The default room set up will be a large table with a circle of chairs–make a note if you need something else. Be sure to include your name.

There will be a google folder in which you upload your annotated bibliography (filename = yourname sci8 1617 an.bib) and your presentation (filename = yourname sci8 1617 himp.pres) < https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B4DPwlouN3dIdVZnX2dCa3VtTGc?usp=sharing >

  • May
  • 2—2 presentations (period 3 Jack, JinYoung)
  • 4—human impact films and reading
  • 8—human impact films and reading
  • 10—3 presentations (periods 3 Jesus, Lucas Jones, Naheul and 4 Andrea, Se-Jeong, YouNa)
  • 12—3 presentatons (periods 3 Mona, Lucas de Jong, Anya Rose and 4 Driena, Rino, JaeHyun, )
  • 16—3 presentations (periods 3 Ethan, Nigel, Nikolay and 4 Mayan, Deacon, Dongha)
  • 18—3 presentations (periods 3 Shiv, Varun, Isabella and 4 SuHan, SangHyun, EunYoung)
  • 22–3 presentations (periods 3 Jay, Anya S., Akshay and 4 Yi Reong, Yusuke)
  • 24–3 presentations (periods 3 Harshita, Ahaan, Jagan)

Here is the original description of the project with standards:

Description:

Human Impact assessment project description for Science 8

Students will research a topic of global/local significance involving Human Impact on Earth Systems.

Students will compose an artifact/set of artifacts defined in consultation with the instructor. This artifact / set of artifacts will focus on documentation of research and communication through presentation, activity, and discussion.

Specifically:

Students will

  1. Conduct research and annotate sources: Well-respected, credible, reliable, valid, accurate websites, journals, in the news (BBC, NYT, NPR, TOI—other sources with approval), books, videos; Interviews and firsthand observations.

Annotation format:

MLA or APA citation style. Complete and consistent.

  • Description of resource (context, type, etc.);
  • Summary of main ideas and important details;
  • Assessment of quality, validity, reliability, point of view, etc.;
  • Your reaction–what it makes you think of, what questions you have, how you feel about the implications of the ideas, facts, argument.

 

  1. Lead a class activitythat is preferably interactive, inquiry-oriented, thought-provoking.
  2. Create Presentationthat is directed toward understanding the science—Leading a Discussion on the issues—Brainstorming Solutions—Presenting existing proposals for solutions.

Reporting standards:

  • SEP
  • Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
  • Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information
  • CCC
  • Systems and System Models
  • DCI
  • Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience
  • Human Impacts on Earth Systems

Some interesting videos about climate change. View these when you have the chance.

 

 

 

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25 April Science 7 Review of the year; Population simulation

Review your digital science notebook from the beginning of the year.

  • Pick out and describe examples from various topics where you did something you had never done before, where you saw something you had never seen before, where you wondered about things you had never thought about before, where you feel you learned something you did not know before.
  • From your selection of examples, describe your learning in science 7 this year.
  • In what direction does your curiosity lie? What would you like to learn more about?
  • How do you feel about your performance in science next year?
  • Use lined paper to write your answers. Take a clear photo of what you write for your blog. Include any pictures (with explanation) you have taken that support your choices.

Population simulations

Oh Deer!

Population with invasive species, predators, etc.

Carrying capacity–Limiting factors

Year Deer Water Shelter Food
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
+

Schedule (tentative)

27 April Survey Predator-Prey (games / simulations)

3 May Prisoner’s Dilemma–Game Theory–Intro to Summative Assessment

Next class you will prepare for this assessment.

finches

http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/origin-species-beak-finch

Carry out the bird beak simulation (see handout or link above). Additional instructions will be given in class. Collect all data.

As individuals:

Make a visual display of the data (be sure to following good graphing practices–choose a scale that covers all the data, that makes the graph as large as possible AND that is convenient). Label axes with variable name and unit. Include a title. Graph first in pencil and make sure it is correct before using ink. Write a summary of the simulation explaining the procedure, the data, and the way natural selection of beak size is modeled. Be sure to connect the data to your ideas. Also describe which parts of the simulation correspond to reality and which parts do not. Also make a statement referring specifically to the standards. The visual display and written portion are due at the end of the next class. They should be submitted in hard copy AND uploaded correctly in your digital science notebook. You must do original work.

Natural Selection and Adaptation SA

  1. Students will carry out a simulation related to the natural selection of bird populations in the Galapagos. The simulation will generate quantitative data based on bird beak size.
  2. Data is collected from the bird beak simulation and analyzed.
  3. Analysis is made and conclusions drawn with respect to structures, environmental effect on bird populations, adaptations, and natural selection.
  4. Product: 1. Visual presentation of the collected quantitative data and analysis. 2. A brief summary of the simulation, collected data, and the cause and effect relationship between beak size and natural selection of bird populations.

The learning standards to be assessed:

Science and Engineering Practices

  • Developing and using models
  • Using mathematics and computational thinking

Cross Cutting Concepts

  • Cause and effect
  • Structure and function

Disciplinary Core Ideas

  • Natural selection and adaptations

5 May Reading and Video–context for Assessment

finches  (Read pp. 121-124. Read about activity pp. 125-134–do not conduct this activity–just prepare your mind. Read about activity pp. 135-140–do not conduct this activity–just prepare your mind. Read about activity pp. 142-144–do not conduct this activity–just prepare your mind. )

We will watch this video together on 5 May. You may watch it beforehand to identify your questions. http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/origin-species-beak-finch

9 May Conducting experiment

11 May Writing results

15 May Summative Assessment due (no lates!)

17 May

19 May

23 May

25 May

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24 April Science 8 Things you have learned? Preparing for your activity/discussion/presentation

Review your digital science notebook from the beginning of the year.

  • Pick out and describe examples from various topics where you did something you had never done before, where you saw something you had never seen before, where you wondered about things you had never thought about before, where you feel you learned something you did not know before.
  • From your selection of examples, describe your learning in science 8 this year.
  • In what direction does your curiosity lie? What would you like to learn more about?
  • How do you feel about your performance in science next year?
  • Use lined paper to write your answers. Take a clear photo of what you write for your blog. Include any pictures (with explanation) you have taken that support your choices.

Planning the activity / discussion / presentation

  • What activity will help your audience appreciate and understand (some of) the science involved in your topic? How will you organize materials and people? How much time will you need?
  • What are the main themes, issues, questions, science ideas related to your topic? How can you get your audience to discuss these? How will you start? How will you respond? How will you follow-up? How will you summarize and conclude?
  • Your presentation should do 2 things:
  1. Provide a basis for initiating your discussion and organizing your activity.
  2. Stand alone as a reference that students can refer to outside of the 25 minutes you have for activity and discussion.
  • How does the idea that human impact on the environment comes from shifting or disrupting some earth cycle relate to your topic? Can you explain the cycle and the science ideas that are involved?
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21 April Science 7 The making of the fittest

http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/making-fittest-natural-selection-and-adaptation

Film guide

http://media.hhmi.org/biointeractive/activities/pocketmouse/AAG_NaturalSelectionandAdaptation.pdf?download=true&_ga=1.73366939.943237259.1490235206

Student quiz

http://media.hhmi.org/biointeractive/activities/pocketmouse/IDGquiz_NaturalSelection.pdf?download=true&_ga=1.73544474.943237259.1490235206

Teachers guide

http://media.hhmi.org/biointeractive/activities/pocketmouse/IDG_NaturalSelection.pdf?download=true&_ga=1.73544474.943237259.1490235206

Activity

Intro http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/color-variation-over-time-rock-pocket-mouse-populations

Materials http://media.hhmi.org/biointeractive/activities/pocketmouse/Mouse_ColorVariation_Teacher.pdf?download=true&_ga=1.153083313.943237259.1490235206

Student handout http://media.hhmi.org/biointeractive/activities/pocketmouse/Mouse_ColorVariation_Student.pdf?download=true&_ga=1.153083313.943237259.1490235206

Also

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B4DPwlouN3dIUzhhc19TUWpTeTQ?usp=sharing

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20 April Science 8–continue research on topic–begin planning discussion and activity

Science in America: Neil de Grasse Tyson https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8MqTOEospfo

Annotations target by end of day: 15-20

Some things to try in planning your discussion.

What are the themes, big ideas, questions, and issues around your topic? What are the essential science ideas associated with your topic? What do you think your classmates already know about the topic? What do you expect their opinions to be? What misunderstandings might they have? What experiences might your classmates have that would connect with some aspect(s) of the topic? What might your classmates know about the science? What mistaken ideas might your classmates have about the important science related to your topic?

  • Develop an engaging starter:

Write a short paragraph describing an example or explaining an issue central to your topic. Use this as a starting point. You will need to offer some information, but the goal is not for you to spend much of your time explaining your topic. Rather, you want to get your classmates to explore ideas related to the topic through discussion. You will need to decide if and when you need to offer relevant information. You should anticipate what that might be.

Think of some question you could ask where students would respond with some personal connection.

Show a powerful photograph and ask your classmates to share their reaction.

Use your activity to set the stage for a discussion.

  • Conducting the discussion:

Having anticipated your classmates’ knowledge and interest in the topic, what will you do with their responses to your starter?

How will you structure the discussion? Pairs first and then share to the large group? Take volunteers? Ask each participant in turn to offer some idea or question? How might you foster student to student discussion? How will you restate, paraphrase, and summarize? How will you ensure that all students participate?

Create questions you intend to consider. Think of the order in which you might pose them? Think of a response or follow up? How can you ask questions that stimulate thought and discussion? Avoid yes/no questions as they tend to be rhetorical. It is sometimes helpful to ask questions that are answerable first. “What do you think” “What do you imagine the possible answers might be?” can be less threatening than an outright, direct question asking for some factual answer that the recipient does not know.

It is good for you to be well-organized and prepared. Know your topic and know your group. Think of where the discussion might go and how you will manage and bring the thread back on track if the topic starts to get lost.

  • Discussion leader skills

The best discussion leaders are flexible and responsive and in control. Listening closely, restating, redirecting, following up with a response and new question that develops ideas are all important discussion leader skills.

At one point as the discussion progresses, introduce the idea of solutions or mitigations to the problems associated with your topic. This is a chance to brainstorm. Accept ideas, develop them, avoid unnecessary argument.

Summarize by recalling points made during the discussion. This is a time to show how well you listened to your classmates.

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19 April Science 7 — Processing the monkey observations

 

 


Read the poem Macaques in the Sky by Gary Snyder . Read and browse the articles below.

Take inspiration from the poem and articles above. Use your observations, notes, questions, and ideas from our observations of Rhesus macaques. Consider our discussion and study of genetics, natural selection, and evolution. Include your personal reflections.

Compose a poem or an essay. Your piece will fall into the domain of science and nature writing.

Share a first draft with a classmate and solicit his or her response. You may choose to revise. Show the draft to Dr. F. After revision, post on your blog (tagged with science 7). Include a picture from one of the 7th grade field trips. We will start a google folder with pictures. (Consider using this for your March for Science creation).

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B4DPwlouN3dIdjRreWhOSEN1RjQ?usp=sharing (let me know if you want editing rights so that you can upload your pictures)

Also submit monkey obs. writing with pictures to https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B_wbo7-5JnbvVUF3ektYU1ZQTG8?usp=sharing

Depending on time, we will share in class.

For homework or at the end of class:

View closely “The Making of the Fittest: Natural Selection and Adaptation” http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/making-fittest-natural-selection-and-adaptation

Questions on this story of natural selection in the next class.

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10, 12, 14, 18 April Science 8 Begin Human Impact Project

At the end of today, you should have as a minimum 9 annotations. By now, you should have become more familiar with your topic. Be sure you are looking at rich and reliable sources. <http://e360.yale.edu/> is a good example of a place to look. (Also BBC and New York Times, Washington Post, Guardian science and environment sections.) Move away from encyclopedic sites to ones that are more specific to your topic. From good news sources, move to the scientific sources the news stories have come from. Now more than ever you must be vigilant about “fake” information.

What questions, issues, and themes have emerged? What focus have you developed for further research? What are the science connections? What are proposals for remedies to the problem? (Find out what amelioration and mitigation mean.)

How can you use what you have learned and what you wonder about to organize a discussion for your classmates? How will you make use of their existing knowledge and ideas to raise the important questions, issues, and themes? The purpose of the discussion is to get your peers to engage actively in thinking about your topic. You want the majority of your time to include participation by your classmates. This may be a new experience for you to plan. It is different from a presentation where you do all the talking and the audience passively receives the information.

When you identify the science that is key to understanding your topic, think about how you could organize a short hands-on activity to introduce the class to those key science phenomena and ideas.

  1. Conduct research, annotate sources, and compile an annotated bibliography: Well-respected, credible, reliable, valid, accurate websites, journals, in the news (BBC, NYT, NPR, TOI—other sources with approval), books, videos; Interviews and firsthand observations. Dr. F will post resources and links to resources. Be on the lookout!

You should look at 3-4 sources each day provided for research. The bibliography is arranged in alphabetical order by authors last name.

Annotation format:

  • Bibliographic information in MLA or APA citation style. Complete and consistent.
  • Description of resource (context, type, etc.);
  • Summary of main ideas and important details;
  • Assessment of quality, validity, reliability, point of view, etc.;
  • Your reaction–what it makes you think of, what questions you have, how you feel about the implications of the ideas, facts, argument.
  1. Lead a class activity that is preferably interactive, hands-on/experiential, inquiry-oriented, thought-provoking. The activity should be clearly linked to the topic. Because the time is short you should focus on some aspect of the topic rather than try to encompass the entire topic.
  2. Create Presentation and lead a discussion that is directed toward understanding the science and the issues—Brainstorming Solutions—Present existing proposals for solutions.
  3. You need to prepare for 25 minutes for both #2 and #3 above. Discuss with Dr. F how you might organize your 25 minutes.

Reporting standards:

  • SEP
  • Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
  • Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information
  • CCC
  • Systems and System Models
  • DCI
  • Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience
  • Human Impacts on Earth Systems

Tentative schedule:

  • April
  • 10 Research
  • 12 Research
  • 14 Research
  • 18 Research (Story on Water Cycle due at beginning of period–paper copy and digital copy in DSN)
  • 20 Research (MAP)
  • 24 Research, Preparation also some comments on the year
  • 26 Research, Preparation, survey
  • May
  • 2—2 presentations (period 3 Jack, JinYoung)
  • 4—human impact films and reading
  • 8—human impact films and reading
  • 10—3 presentations (periods 3 Jesus, Lucas Jones, Naheul and 4 Andrea, Se-Jeong, YouNa)
  • 12—3 presentatons (periods 3 Mona, Lucas de Jong, Anya Rose and 4 Driena, Rino, JaeHyun, )
  • 16—3 presentations (periods 3 Ethan, Nigel, Nikolay and 4 Mayan, Deacon, Dongha)
  • 18—3 presentations (periods 3 Shiv, Varun, Isabella and 4 SuHan, SangHyun, EunYoung)
  • 22–3 presentations (periods 3 Jay, Anya S., Akshay and 4 Yi Reong, Yusuke)
  • 24–3 presentations (periods 3 Harshita, Ahaan, Jagan)
  • 25 Grades due
  • 26
  • 30

What points of information do you need to record when you consult each source? What criteria will you use to decide on the reliability, validity, credibility of a source? Why?

See this from Cornell on the annotated bibliography:

http://guides.library.cornell.edu/annotatedbibliography

Very useful source: http://e360.yale.edu/

http://e360.yale.edu/features/with-climate-change-deniers-in-charge-time-for-scientists-to-step-up-trenberth-trump

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13 April Science 7 Practice ethological observation in preparation for field trip

Dog ethograms: CanineMSHS        pred_etho_canid1

Video practice: https://www.youtube.com/user/PatriciaMcConnell/videos

Dogs Decoded: http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/dogs-decoded/

A dog_s day with humans 2

The Origin of Human: http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/great-transitions-origin-humans

http://eol.org/pages/1228387/overview

http://eol.org/pages/327960/overview

http://itp.suzkirkpatrick.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Snow-Monkeys_Observation-Sheet1.pdf

http://nc3rs.org.uk/macaques/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Ethogram-for-general-behavioural-monitoring-Caralyn-Kemp.pdf

https://lbmp.anthro.ucla.edu/ethogram-behavioral-videos/

https://vimeo.com/45906210

Japanese macaques https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1eN43h0JNQY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n51bZRzNeoA

Macaques Thailand https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WezzTYtfMxc

Rhesus macaques http://natgeotv.com/in/monkey-thieves/videos/monkey-thieves

http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/macaque_mayhem

Gray langurs Jodhpur http://www.express.co.uk/news/nature/741837/planet-earth-2-monkey-rooftop-jumping-chase-video-best-ever-filmed-bbc

Designing an ethogram https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kWeXRL0JZvM

Animal behavior sampling https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ay-7LNMab40

Dogs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BITAJnpo88I

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17WBkCYjtFI&index=2&list=PLjNS6VD_LojNIb4ab4S9BKitmVymvpSf_

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngcxkiol0y0&index=9&list=PLjNS6VD_LojNIb4ab4S9BKitmVymvpSf_

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RtOoGbhIBps

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xSFMBEE9rU4

live wolves https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUCHs1TG3aM

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11 April Science 7 Heredity, DNA, Reproduction–Dog ethograms–Observing behavior

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBezq1fFUEA&index=9&list=PL3EED4C1D684D3ADF

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8kK2zwjRV0M&list=PL3EED4C1D684D3ADF&index=10

Dog ethograms: CanineMSHS        pred_etho_canid1

Video practice: https://www.youtube.com/user/PatriciaMcConnell/videos

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