12-14-16-20 (Project Due 28 Nov) November Science 8 Summative Project (Chemical Reactions)

For today 20 November

  • Mindful moment
  • Review work from previous class
  • Begin work on “product” (see options below AND see learning criteria for success)
  • you have investigated a particular chemical reaction (or family of reactions) and have gathered and analyzed both quantitative and qualitative data

  • chemical formula and other visual representation of a chemical reaction (like the ball and stick models of molecules) must be included and explained based on acquired data and observations

  • chemical formula or other visual representation of a chemical reaction must also demonstrate an understanding that substances are composed of different types of atoms combined in specific ways

  • demonstrate an understanding of the Law of the Conservation of Mass/Matterand how it is represented in your chemical change investigation

  • your investigation procedure should be documented in your final product

  • a final product (see below) (a clear photograph, a link and/or file is needed in addition to any material pieces as your situation warrants)

  • reference list–complete bibliographic information

  • a reflection outlining how each of the learning criteria are met in your final product—how you have “met” or “approached” each of the listed standards with examples drawn from your work. Explain specifically (with examples) how your thinking about matter has grown and changed during the course. Comment on your level of effort–DSN complete and up-to-date? Matter chart as complete as possible? Did you attempt the matter chart and try to link observations with explanations using atoms and molecules? What did you learn by trying to develop explanations for the variety of things you/we observed?

  • Seek assistance.
  • If you still need to do work in the lab, check in first.

Need volunteers from each class for Newsletter 2 which will feature this current summative project–interview, pictures, sketches, excerpts, samples, reflections. 

For today 16 November

  • Mindful moment with your group
  • Work with group to look at previous class / previous discussion / previous decisions
  • If you have not gotten approval for your proposed question and procedure, do so right away.
  • Seek assistance with conducting your investigation.
  • Work safely, neatly.
  • Keep complete and organized records of what you do, see, talk about, think, wonder question.

Several groups in all classes are investigating the question of combining proportions of reactants and how much of reactant A is required to completely react with a given amount of reactant B. You might find this short article helpful: https://www.learner.org/courses/chemistry/text/text.html?dis=U&num=Ym5WdElUQS9OeW89&sec=YzJWaklUQS9PQ289

Need volunteers from each class for Newsletter 2 which will feature this current summative project–interview, pictures, sketches, excerpts, samples, reflections.

After you conduct the quantitative/empirical/experimental portion of your investigation, turn toward the theoretical representation using the ball and stick models of molecules–as in:

The reactants are vinegar and baking soda. Vinegar is a solution of 5% acetic acid and 95% water. Baking soda is also called sodium hydrogen carbonate. The products are carbon dioxide, sodium acetate, and water. The reaction can be represented as: (NaHCO3 + HC2H3O2 → NaC2H3O2 + H2O + CO ).  Can you tell which symbols refer to which molecules?

See a representation of the reaction using “ball and stick” molecular models. See if you can follow the changes:

White ball = hydrogen; black ball = carbon; red ball = oxygen; silver ball = sodium; gray stick = bond (c0valent); purple stick = bond (ionic)

2 “rules” for reactions:

  • All atoms from the reactants end up somewhere–they do not disappear and new ones do not appear. (Conservation of Mass)
  • The reaction takes place in the fewest number of steps. (This rule relates to the concept of energy. You will explore and employ this concept more thoroughly as you advance in your study of matter / chemistry.)

startreactvbs

.

midreactvbs.endreactvbs

From previous class

  • Mindful moment.
  • Review past class in your DSN entry.
  • Form group 3, 2, or 1 person(s). Be sure you have worked together productively in the past. If there is any history of partners not functioning well, do not chose to work together. Need approval from Dr. F–may need to make a contract.Together read today’s plan in the blogpost.
  • Prepare DSN entry for today. Make plans with group on organizing and sharing all data and thinking. Make contingency plans for absences. (Each student keeps their own records and notes in their own DSN, but you may share ideas and data with one another.)
  • In your group. Develop some questions specifically about the Summative Project.

Some questions from our last class before the fall break–

period 5

  • More about molecules—how they form—how they are connected
  • More about—
  • How is periodic table organized? (Story of Mendeleev’s discovery/invention of the periodic table)
  • How do we know atoms exist? What is the evidence?
  • How does matter change states?
  • How are electrons related to magnetism?
  • What branches of science are not concerned with matter? (Einstein connected matter and energy.)
  • What about anti-matter?
  • More about the reaction between atoms—how do molecules actually change and how do atoms actually rearrange?
  • How is periodic table organized and why is it organized in that way?
  • (Uncle Tungsten—-Oliver Sacks)
  • How many atoms in a typical human body (how big are atoms?)
  • What is the argument Einstein used to make the connection between matter and energy?
  • What happens with atoms and molecules during dissolving so that they become invisible?
  • How do scientists calculate the number of atoms in an object? (Avogadro’s number).
  • Why are molecules different sizes?
  • How do scientists find out what happens in a chemical reaction? How similar are a professional scientists techniques to the ones we have used?
  • What is the important of a medium (like water) for a reaction to take place?
  • Why do some substances react and some don’t?
  • Are there particles smaller than atoms?
  • Are there extraterrestrial molecules/substances different from terrestrial molecules/substances?
  • Are all atoms of a certain element the same? Yes and no—there are isotopes.
  • Is a chemical change different from a physical change?
  • Difference in reactions in space as compared to earth—check research from space station and shuttle.

Period 7

  • What is matter made of? What is the composition of material objects?
  • What is the difference between ionic bond and covalent bond?
  • How was matter found? What is the history of ideas about matter?
  • Why do some substances react and some do not?
  • How many reactions are there–on earth? in a living thing? involving a certain element–carbon, for example?
  • How are new elements created? (nuclear processes)
  • What is electricity? Is it a state of matter? Is lightning a form of matter called plasma?
  • Are there different kinds of chemical reactions?
  • Are new atoms being built? (Nuclear processes in stars)
  • How is the periodic table related to matter?
  • Why is matter important in your life?

Period 8

  • Is a rainbow related to matter?
  • Why is the periodic table arranged the way it is? (Find out how Mendeleev invented the periodic table?)
  • How are the different states of matter explained?
  • Is light matter? (Einstein related matter and energy. )
  • What are the factors affecting how atoms are rearranged into molecules in a chemical reaction?
  • How are substances investigated–like gases that are not visible?
  • State of matter of Non-newtonian fluids?
  • Forms of matter before the big bang? (Weinberg The First Three Minutes) (Cosmology)
  • What was the problem with the Bohr model? (Quantum mechanics)
  • Is it possible to produce an absolute vacuum?
  • What about anti-matter?

Selecting a reaction?

Safety–personal and environmental, feasibility, availability

  • You may use a reaction from earlier in class (see your matter chart and go further) or a new reaction (remember the safety and availability requirements)
  • Finding the proportions of reactants for a complete reaction. (For example, how much vinegar is required for a complete reaction with 1 gram of baking soda? Approach this empirically and theoretically (using the “weights” of the molecules based on the molecular formula and the periodic table))
  • Examining the properties of the products of a reaction. (Gases? Soluble projects that can be recovered by evaporation–takes time? Precipitates of insoluble products?)
  • Investigating factors affecting the rate of a reaction. (Temperature?, Concentration?, Surface area?) (Voltage in the case of electrolysis?)
  • Comparing a family of reactions. (For example, how do the reactions of vinegar with different carbonates compare–sodium hydrogen carbonate, sodium carbonate, calcium carbonate, magnesium carbonate) (For example, how do different metals (iron, zinc, magnesium, aluminum) react with a solution of copper sulfate?) (How is electric voltage affected by different combinations of metals dipped into vinegar? This involves making simple wet cell batteries.)
  • Other–with evidence of research and, of course, safety
  • You might find some ideas here: http://www.middleschoolchemistry.com/
  • * * * *

Product guidelines

Students may choose how they present and demonstrate their learning. There will be no traditional paper and pencil test.

Possibilities: science fair poster–(well-crafted, neat, attractive), video, presentation, report, ibook…you may be creative!

Learning criteria for success:

  1. chemical formula and other visual representation of a chemical reaction (like the ball and stick models of molecules) must be included and explained based on acquired data and observations
  2. chemical formula or other visual representation of a chemical reaction must also demonstrate an understanding that substances are composed of different types of atoms combined in specific ways
  3. demonstrate an understanding of the Law of the Conservation of Mass/Matterand how it is represented in your chemical change investigation
  4. your investigation procedure should be documented in your final product

Standards derived from NGSS:

  • Developing and using models
  • Planning and carrying out investigations
  • Stability and change
  • Chemical Reactions

Work neatly and carefully. Label and organize your data. Make data tables. Think of what you might graph. Ask if you have questions. Be observant. Record your ideas.

Get proposal approved and begin work.

Begin brainstorming and planning the chemical reactions summative project. See below.

Chemistry Unit Summative Assessment

This assessment is individual though you may work with up to two partners to develop and implement a plan. Partners are important. Only work with partners who are responsible and productive.

This assessment will take place over the course of 3-4 class days and your own time.

Brainstorm and planning 12 November;

Lab work 14 and 16 November;

Workday 20 November;

We will start astronomy on 26 November.

Project due 28 November.

You will need:

  1. a documented AND *approved* plan/proposal (paper and digital in DSN) for the investigation of a particular reaction (or family of reactions) that gathers and analyzes both quantitative and qualitative
  2. a final product (see below) (a clear photograph, a link and/or file is needed in addition to any material pieces as your situation warrants)
  3. reference list–complete bibliographic information
  4. a reflection outlining how each of the learning criteria are met in your final product—how you have “met” or “approached” each of the listed standards with examples drawn from your work. Explain specifically (with examples) how your thinking about matter has grown and changed during the course.

General Assessment Guidelines:

  • the investigation must involve or demonstrate a chemical change
  • the investigation portion of the assessment from brainstorming up to the product can be done with a partner or individually
  • the final product must be individual
  • the investigation can be based on previous class activities, but it cannot be identical; the investigation can build on and extend things we have done in class; the investigation can be related to a specific question you have had in connection with a class activity, discussion, or presentation; mining youtube, etc. for ideas is strongly discouraged (connect your idea to the learning criteria, the standards, and the ideas we have introduced and explored in our class)
  • you plan/proposal needs to make clear how your choice is related to what we have done and how you intend to meet the various criteria of the project
  • both quantitative and qualitative data should be gathered from the investigation
  • safety first, both for you and the environment
  • materials must be available and requested in a timely fashion
  • teacher approval required

Plan/proposal: Plan/Proposal:

  • Reaction(s)? You need a clearly expressed research question–naming the reaction(s) and the variables you will examine.
  • Safety?
  • Materials?
  • Procedure plan (flow chart of tasks; timeline; storyboard)?
  • Product plan (flow chart of tasks; timeline; storyboard)?
  • Expectations and why (featuring your knowledge of atoms and molecules)
  • How will you meet criteria for project and for learning?
  • What information–data, graphs, images, etc.–will you need for your product?
  • Additional research on reaction?
  • References

 

About rfrazier

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