30 September Science 7 Revising the Tumble Buggy / Preparing for parent conferences / Partner tree

We will perform the thought experiment of the rotating weight. We will need video (slow motion) and photos. For period 8 we will post a video and photos here:

 

Compare the actual result to what you expected. Post this on your blog as you did for the cart-pulling example. How do you explain the actual result?

Open powerschool and read the comments on your Tumble Buggy Report. You now have 2 weeks if you want to resubmit. In order to resubmit, you should read the comments and compare to your self-assessment. Ask any questions you have. Revise according to the comments. Resubmit with a copy of the comments, the original paper, and the revised paper, and a new self-assessment that considers the first self-assessment and what you have done in the revision. All of these documents should also be loaded properly in the digital science notebook. Due in two weeks if you want to resubmit.

Prepare for Student-Teacher-Parent conference.

  • Create a document in which you list links to the work you intend to show (see below). No need to create a presentation as you may need to access work in different order. Do not write a script. We will have a conversation. Do think about the things you choose.
  • Have your digital science notebook up-to-date.
  • Describe what you have found to be the most interesting so far this year.
  • Have examples picked out (linked) from your digital science notebook.
  • Pick out the most complete entry.
  • Pick out the entry where you feel you learned the most.
  • Pick out the entry where you were surprised, puzzled, or uncertain.
  • Have these three entries available for quick access (save the links an put them in a Student-Parent-Teacher document).
  • Pick out your most thoughtful blog post and have the link ready for easy access.
  • Be prepared to explain why you think it is most thoughtful.
  • Have your tumble buggy project available with a link.
  • Have the comments on the project available.
  • Be prepared to discuss your revisions.
  • What have been the greatest challenges.
  • Why do you think they are challenging?
  • Be prepared to share a plan for how you hope to work in science for the rest of the year.

During the last 10 minutes of class, visit your partner tree. Take photos. Make observations. See something new that you did not notice before. Organize your observations in your digital science notebook. You need a folder called partner tree. Be sure to record the date and time of your observations.

https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/1wYRIYo1x-6qI82SjYgI4maet-ilg8kV4AfqheIQH09w/edit?usp=sharing

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30 September Science 8 Data on Conservation of Mass experiments / Preparing for Parent Conferences

Find the mass of the following bottles.

  • Vinegar and steel wool.
  • Steel wool and moist air.
  • Moistened paper towel and mung beans.

Enter data on the class spreadsheet.

Do not open the bottles. Record any observations of the bottles themselves and the contents. Think about what might be happening.

If you did not set up the experiment, do so.

http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2016/09/28/28-september-science-8-some-chemical-reactions-mass-before-and-mass-after/

Prepare for Student Teacher Parent conferences:

  • Create a document to hold links to various artifacts. Do not create a presentation or create a script. We only want you to have quick access.
  • Have your digital science notebook up-to-date.
  • Describe what you have found the most interesting so far this year.
  • Have examples picked out (linked) from your digital science notebook.
  • Pick out the most complete entry.
  • Pick out the entry where you feel you learned the most.
  • Pick out the entry where you were surprised, puzzled, or uncertain.
  • Have these three entries available for quick access (save the links an put them in a Student-Parent-Teacher document).
  • Pick out your most thoughtful blog post and have the link ready for easy access.
  • Be prepared to explain why you think it is most thoughtful.
  • Have your ethanol and water available with a link.
  • Be prepared to discuss your revisions.
  • What have been the greatest challenges.
  • Why do you think they are challenging?
  • Be prepared to share a plan for how you hope to work in science for the rest of the year.
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29 September Science 7 Inertia and Force–Consolidating our thinking–Student Parent Teacher conferences

  1. Please allow me to share a note I just received from a former 7th grade student:

Good morning, Dr. Frazier, This is just a quick note thanking you for helping spark an interest in science back in 7th grade (1998-1999) at SAS. I didn’t realize it then, but almost 2 decades later, some of the core concepts I learned through you, JB and DS really helped craft my educational path. You taught me the necessity and benefits of keeping a scientific journal and always wanted our class to explore the outdoors. The result? I ended up minoring in Geology/Environmental Science 10 years after your class. Correlation may not always be causation, but you helped spark that curiosity and interest in the world we live in. Today, those scientific skills and methods have helped craft me as a professional as well. Thank you once again. Your former student MM

2. If a weight tied to a string is spun around a central point (on a smooth floor) and is released, what path do you think it will take and why? Draw a sketch of the expected path and explain your thoughts.

wtonstring

 

 

 

 

 

3. Blogpost Compare your cart-pulling expectation (graph and reason) with the experience of pulling the cart with a constant force and graph. What have you learned about force and motion? How has your thinking changed or grown? Why do you think you had the expectation you did? Make a blog post in category Science 7 showing your expectation graph, the actual graph, and a reflection about your thinking and the motion of the cart being pulled with a constant force. Due today.

4. Open powerschool and read the comments on your Tumble Buggy Report. You now have 2 weeks if you want to resubmit. In order to resubmit, you should read the comments and compare to your self-assessment. Ask any questions you have. Revise according to the comments. Resubmit with a copy of the comments, the original paper, and the revised paper, and a new self-assessment that considers the first self-assessment and what you have done in the revision. All of these documents should also be loaded properly in the digital science notebook. Due in two weeks if you want to resubmit.

5. Prepare for Student-Teacher-Parent conference.

  • Have your digital science notebook up-to-date.
  • Describe what you have found the most interesting so far this year.
  • Have examples picked out (linked) from your digital science notebook.
  • Pick out the most complete entry.
  • Pick out the entry where you feel you learned the most.
  • Pick out the entry where you were surprised, puzzled, or uncertain.
  • Have these three entries available for quick access (save the links an put them in a Student-Parent-Teacher document).
  • Pick out your most thoughtful blog post and have the link ready for easy access.
  • Be prepared to explain why you think it is most thoughtful.
  • Have your tumble buggy project available with a link.
  • Have the comments on the project available.
  • Be prepared to discuss your revisions.
  • What have been the greatest challenges.
  • Why do you think they are challenging?
  • Be prepared to share a plan for how you hope to work in science for the rest of the year.

 

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28 September Science 8 Some chemical reactions–mass before and mass after

For the next series of experiments:

Pd. 3

  • Nikolay Anya Rose
  • Aanya Jagan
  • Akshay Jin Young
  • Nigel Mona
  • Shiv Isabella Jesus
  • Harshita Lucas
  • Nahuel Varun
  • Jay Ethan
  • Maya Ahaan

Pd. 4

  • Deacon Rino
  • Eva Yususke
  • Ji Soo Driena
  • Dong Ha Eun Young
  • Sang Hyun Andrea

Look at the Atkin’s introduction again:IMG_0589

Notice how he mentions the balance as an essential instrument for the development of chemistry. Today we embark on a series of investigations that parallel the idea that what happens to mass during chemical transformations is a fundamental pattern in the behavior of matter. This pattern is explained by the characteristics and behavior of atoms and molecules. (You will be adding to your chart of observations–evidence and argument–atomic-molecular theory.)

It is absolutely necessary to weigh things carefully to get good data. Check zero, keep things clean, do not spill, record results accurately and completely (with labels). You always need to think of the order of weighing things. You always need to take account of containers that need to be used and weighed. Even a small paper cup to hold some chemical powder must be weighed.

Always write what you expect to happen and why before you begin. You may call this an expectation. 

Take good notes. Organize and label your data. Take pictures. Make sketches. Record your thoughts and questions as you go. Discuss your ideas with your partner. Share data with each other.

Ice Melting

  1. What happens to the mass of an ice cube after it changes into liquid water? (Nothing is allowed to escape; nothing is added)
  2. Find the mass of a clean, dry canning jar with a tight fitting lid.
  3. Add an ice cube, seal the lid, and find the mass.
  4. Let the ice cube melt, wipe the outside of any condensation, be sure the balance is clean and dry, and find the mass again.
  5. Enter data in your own notes.
  6. Enter data on class spreadsheet.

Steel Wool and Vinegar

  1. What happens to the mass of steel wool and vinegar (steel wool is immersed) kept in a closed container?
  2. Remove the label if there is one on a plastic pop bottle. Label with masking tape, your names, period, date, time, steel wool and vinegar.
  3. Find the mass of the newly labeled bottle and lid.
  4. Get a piece of steel wool. Ask Dr. F about the size. Find the mass. Put the steel wool in the bottle.
  5. Get an amount of vinegar that is sufficient to cover the steel wool. (No steel wool should stick out above the surface of the vinegar.) Find the mass of the vinegar.
  6. Find the total mass of the bottle, tightly screwed on lid, steel wool, vinegar, (and air that is in the bottle).
  7. Be sure to record your expectations, all data in your notes and in the class spreadsheet, and to take pictures.

Steel wool and moist air

Get a piece of steel wool that has been soaked in vinegar to remove the coating of oil that is part of the process of marketing steel wool. Check with Dr. F for the size.

  1. Label a bottle with tape. Names, period, date, time, steel wool and air.
  2. Find the mass of the bottle, label and lid.
  3. Weigh the bottle with steel wool, moist air, tightly fitted lid.
  4. Record data appropriately, as above. Be sure to record your expectations.

Mung beans in moist towel

  1. Label a bottle with tape. Names, period, date, time, mung beans in moist towel.
  2. Find the mass of the bottle, label, and lid.
  3. Find the mass of a dry spoon full of mung beans.
  4. Moisten a paper towel and make a roll with the beans inside.
  5. Add 1 ml water to the bottle. Insert the paper towel with bean into the bottle, tighten the lid.
  6. Find the total mass of the bottle, beans, paper towel and lid (closed tightly).
  7. Record data appropriately (as above).

Baking soda and vinegar in an open bottle

  1. Write what you expect to happen to the mass after the vinegar and baking soda have reacted.
  2. Weigh a bottle without a label and lid.
  3. Weigh 2 grams of baking soda.
  4. Weight 40 grams of vinegar.
  5. Weigh bottle, baking soda, and vinegar together but without mixing.
  6. Add baking soda and vinegar to bottle. Do not spill anything.
  7. Weigh bottle, contents after the vinegar and baking soda have completed reaction.
  8. Compare the total mass before the reaction and the total mass after. Find the difference.
  9. Record data appropriately as above.

Link to data spreadsheets. Let me know when you are ready and I will give you editing privileges. https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B4DPwlouN3dIRmJyTE9zd2t3M3M?usp=sharing

See these two episodes from The Ring of Truth: An Inquiry into How We Know What We Know (Change)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1b1S31xGFc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aBj0ypOuiFY

Full Chapter Change: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nk8CQNThbc0

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27 September Science 7 Change in motion from a constant force–graphs

Here is the data from pulling the cart with a constant force. There are also events with one impulse at the beginning and repeated impulses during the observed motion. One of the challenges in learning about motion is to compare ideal cases where real world factors do not play a significant role with actual firsthand experience. Our cart pulling examples were real. Can you see how a constant force (keeping the spring stretched the same amount) and inertia resulted in changing speed?

Write summaries of what each graph shows. Make sure all your work is recorded in you digital science notebook.

Make distance vs. time graphs according to class instructions.

constant-force-cart

Here is some ideal data from a free-falling object toward the surface of the earth. Air resistance does not play a role in these values. Graph them on a distance vs. time graph

Distance fallen at 1 second = 4.9 m

Distance fallen at 2 seconds=19.6 m

Distance fallen at 3 seconds=44.1 m

Distance fallen at 4 seconds=78.4 m

Distance fallen at 5 seconds=122.5 m

The speed changes uniformly and a smooth curve appears on the distance vs. time graph.

How could we figure out what the speed is at any particular moment? This concept is called instantaneous speed. It is possible for you to get a very close estimate of the instantaneous speed using graphical techniques. These graphical techniques can be understood by a 7th grader who realizes that the slope of a straight line segment on a distance vs. time graph is equal to the speed. These graphical techniques are a preview of a branch of mathematics (of change) invented by Sir Isaac Newton (at the same time as Gottfried Leibniz) now called the calculus. I will show any interested students how the graphical technique can be used where you have good data for constant acceleration produced by a constant force.

Speed changing in a constant way is called constant acceleration. Take this example:

A car begins at rest, at the end of the first second, it is traveling at 10 km / hr. At the end of the second second at 20 km/hr. At the end of the third second at 30 km/hr. And so on until it reaches 60 km / hr. The speed is changing in a regular way. It increases 10 km /hr every second. Or 10 km/hr/s. Acceleration then is reported as distance / time * time (time squared). You may need to think about how this works mathematically.

Consider making a graph showing speed vs. time. If the speed were constant, the graph line would be horizontal. If the speed were changing at a constant rate (a constant acceleration) the graph line would be a straight sloping line. The degree of slope would be equal to the rate of acceleration. Let that digest.

If there is time, we will try to get some data on a lump of falling clay from different distances on the outside stairs.

While you are waiting today, catch up on your blog and your digital science notebook.

Read and respond to 5 different blogs (science 7 posts) in your class. Share your tumble buggy projects with your table mates today. Read and respond to each other in writing. Ask questions.

 

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26 Sept. Science 8 Beginning chemical reactions

Period 4. Sit at 3 tables as evenly distributed as possible with people you have worked with the least.

Period 3. Sit at 3 tables as evenly distributed as possible with people you have worked with the least.

Brainstorm statements that you think are important and true about chemical reactions. Keep a list. Choose the 10 most important and rank them. Match a reason for the importance to each statement. Include a list of most “pressing” questions from your discussion.

Complete the probes presented in class.

Begin experiments.

See the following videos–express your ideas and questions.

http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-genius-of-mendeleev-s-periodic-table-lou-serico

Hunting the Elements

https://youtu.be/TDY59XoFSQI

World within World from the Ascent of Man by Jacob Bronowski

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x20o2dw_bbc-ascent-of-man-10-world-within-world_tv

Elements and the economy:http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01rcrn6/episodes/guide

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

caption

 

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21 Sept. Sci 7 Partner Trees– “Moving on” with Motion

Partner Tree selection

See google sheet: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/1wYRIYo1x-6qI82SjYgI4maet-ilg8kV4AfqheIQH09w/edit?usp=sharing

  • Sit together in 4’s who have the same area (organized alphabetically by roster)
  • Choose your tree
  • Take pictures–overall, leaf / leaves closeup / flower / fruit / bark / other distinguishing features
  • Write an initial description–size, overall shape, leaves, flowers, fruits, distinguishing features, anything else you notice
  • Note location so that you can find it again
  • Get name from Dr. F (if he knows it). Try to find other names–in the future–see references.
  • Do this in 15 minutes.

Tree references

“Moving on” with motion:

  • You have learned how to observe, collect data, analyze data, and draw conclusions about motion.
  • You have learned to graph motion according to position and time. You have learned what motions look like on a position vs. time graph from the graph lines.
  • You have learned that the slope of any straight line segment on a position vs. time graph is equal to the average speed.
  • You have learned that the steeper slope is equal to the faster speed.
  • You have learned that time is difficult / impossible to measure without motion.
  • You have learned that time is involved in determining speed but is not the same thing as speed.
  • You have learned that speed is the rate of change of position.
  • You have learned that average speed is about an interval of distance or time. Average speed does not refer to an instant or a single position.
  • You have looked closely at a device that exhibits nearly constant speed.
  • You have learned that we may have ideas about motion that prevent us from seeing other aspects of motion (remember the backwards bike).

In our world on earth–our regular daily life–we rarely see constant velocity (remember that velocity is speed and direction), except for rest. Most of the time things are speeding up, slowing down, or turning.

Today we turn our attention to the observation and analysis of changing velocities.

The concept of force (is “force” your backwards bike?)

A thought experiment:

Pulling a cart with a constant force? See diagram on board.

Motion toys:

How could you observe the motion, collect data on the motion, analyze the motion?

How do the toys work? How do the parts move? How does the motion of one part influence the motion of another? What is the mechanism?

Pictures? Video?

 

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20 and 22 September Science 8

20 Sept:

Continue working on assessment. Let me (Dr. F) know if you are going to work after school .Can stay until 5:00 pm.

  • Remember that you need sufficient data–quantitative and qualitative.
  • Remember that you need to test one of the proposed explanations.
  • Remember that you need to investigate some aspect of the mixing phenomena more deeply or more thoroughly.
  • Remember to follow the guidelines and format closely.
  • Remember to have a print copy ready BEFORE class Thursday.
  • Remember to have a digital copy named and uploaded correctly to your digital science notebook BEFORE class Thursday.

A few things I was thinking about:

  • Comparing densities of mixtures of different proportions to predicted densities.
  • Freezing mixtures of different proportions—decanting liquid–comparing properties.
  • Observing drops of water and ethanol colliding under the microscope.
  • Observing drops of salt water and ethanol colliding under the microscope.
  • Layering water, oil, alcohol (try thinner layer of oil). Mix. Watch bubbling.
  • Mixing ethanol with previously boiled water to compare the bubbling that occurs when. mixed with water directly from the tap.
  • Observe temperature rise for different proportions of mixtures.
  • Compare all the phenomena of mixing ethanol and water with rubbing alcohol and water.
  • Comparing the effects of mixing saturated salt water solution with ethanol.
  • Comparing the effects of mixing saturated sugar water solution with ethanol.

22 Sept:

It is cloudy today, so we will not be able to observe the moon and sun. However, please do read the astronomy information below and begin watching the sun and the moon. Pay attention to positions, apparent motions, shadows, phases, times and dates. Today if you are waiting or finished with writing your self-assessment and blogpost, please watch: Mapping from the Ring of Truth: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRY2SkMTafc

How can you measure distances indirectly–the accomplishment of surveyors and the usefulness of triangles? What parts do you understand and what parts do you not understand–keep a record.

We will look for the moon and begin regular observations as a part of our astronomy unit. Make a new subfolder called astronomy. Start watching the sun and the moon–when it is visible. Start trying to figure out the pattern to the motions you observe.

To observe something in the sky, you need to know the direction you are looking, and the angle you must make from level (the horizon) to view the object. That means you need a compass to name the direction or bearing and a clinometer or angle measurer to get the angle. Find free apps that will accomplish those two functions. You also need the time and the date. The location. You should also note the shape of the moon (draw it carefully) and its orientation. See the photos at the end of this blogpost.

At 12:10  today-Thursday 22 September–please come to the organic garden if you can. It is a special moment in the earth’s travel around the sun. Local noon is at 12:14. We will set up an observation gnomon and take photos of shadows as the sun moves (it is the earth that is actually moving in its rotation). At 12:14 the shadow will be the shortest. It will be pointing north. This is the one day in the fall when the time between sunrise and sunset is equal to the time between sunset and sunrise. It is called the autumnal equinox (for equal nights). The sun’s angle of elevation at local noon on this day–when the sun is at its highest point in the sky–added to the latitude of the place of observation–(about 28.5 degrees) = 90 degrees. Can you figure out why? These observations of the objects in the sky from the point of view of the earth eventually brought humans to understand the motions of the moon and planets in our solar system. Can you follow the thinking?

We will take measurements of our gnomon and the sun’s shadow at local noon and try to figure out the sun’s elevation.

https://www.timeanddate.com/moon/india/new-delhi

21 Sept. 10:46 (287°) 22:03 (72°) 03:58 (75.4°)
22 Sept. 11:49 (290°) 22:56 (70°) 04:55 (78.0°)

 

Self-assessment on lined paper:

After you turn in your paper, read the information below about the project. Write on lined paper with your name and period a specific self-evaluation of your report. If you think it is meeting, share specific examples. If you think it is not meeting, explain what you need to do to bring it to that level. Do this seriously! Describe your experience with the Mixing Alcohol and Water investigation. Do you think it gave you the opportunity to demonstrate what you know about matter and what you can do in order to investigate matter? Be specific. Provide examples.

Review the description of the project: sci8 assessment-matter1617 

2 goals for the report:

  1. Test at least 1 proposed explanation. Gather evidence either to support or challenge the explanation. Test should go beyond what we already know from replicating the original demonstration.
  2. Investigate some “new” aspect of the phenomena of mixing the ethanol and water.

Meeting means:

  • Some aspects of the phenomena are explored.
  • Clear relationship is drawn between data and claims.
  • Sufficient relevant data are gathered.
  • Science and engineering practices (careful measurement; repeated trials; control of variables; graphing guidelines; etc.) are demonstrated.
  • Data / patterns in the data are explained.
  • Explanations explicitly address the atomic-molecular theory of matter.
  • Explanations are tested where possible. Tests of explanations are proposed.
  • Report is comparable in detail and quality to that shown in exemplar:
  • http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/files/2014/08/Mixing-Alcohol-and-Water-composite-report.pdf

Learning standards to be assessed:     Science and Engineering practices:

  1.     Asking questions and using models.
  2.     Developing and using models.
  3.     Planning and carrying out investigations.
  4.     Analyzing and interpreting data.
  5.     Using mathematics and computational thinking.
  6.     Constructing explanations and designing solutions.
  7.     Engaging in argument from evidence.
  8.     Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

  1.     Structure and Properties of Matter.

After you finish the self-evaluation, write a 5 paragraph reflective post (category Science 7) on your blog. Include a link to your Mixing Ethanol and Water Report. Set the sharing of the link to “anyone who has the link.” Ask if you do not know how to do this.

  1. Describe your initial ideas about the science of matter–before we began our class. Describe any changes in your ideas–growth of old ideas, change of old ideas, development of new ideas, etc. Be very specific and use examples. Where is your thinking now? How close do you think your understanding of matter is to a scientist’s? What do you think you need to do to think more like a scientist–hint: look at the cross-cutting concepts and science and engineering practices above?
  2. What activities have been most meaningful to your learning? Why do you think this is the case? What has been most surprising? Why do you / did you find it surprising? What is most interesting to you about motion? Talk specifically about the Mixing Ethanol and Water project. To what extent has it helped you think about matter. Give examples. When have you thought about matter outside of the class (since school began)? What are your most burning questions related to matter? What kinds of answer would satisfy your curiosity?
  3. What has been most difficult and challenging for you? What do you think makes it difficult or challenging? What do you think you could specifically do to help you with barriers and challenges to learning about the science of matter?
  4. What do you think will come next in our study of matter? Why do you think this?
  5. What words have you included in your list of science terms related to the study of matter? Describe how you have made, kept up with, and updated this list. What words do you think you should add? How do the words you have on your list and the words you have not included relate to your answers in the questions above.

What has been happening in the sky? Add these observations to your quest to understand the patterns of motion seen in objects in the sky. Start with the sun and the moon. See these photos:

Moon looking a little north of west from E 9/15 on 18 Sept. at 6:00 am. Did not record bearing or elevation, but silhouettes of tree and building can be detected.

6am18sep16flmoon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sun setting at 5:30 pm on 18 September 9/15 Vasant Vihar and compass showing the direction along the horizon. This is called the bearing or azimuth.

sunset18sep530pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sunset18sept530pmbearing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sun setting at 6:00 pm on 18 September 9/15 Vasant Vihar. The sun is very difficult to see in this picture. It is almost set right by the trees in the distance. See the second photo below. Also see the bearing or azimuth.

sunset18sept6pm
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sunset18sep6pma

 

 

 

 

sunset18sep6pmbearing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Moon setting at 7:00 am on 19 September 9/15 Vasant Vihar. The phase is just past full. As the morning brightens with the sun’s light, it becomes harder to see the moon, whose own brightness is reflected light from the sun.

moonset19sept7am

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

moonsetbearing19sept7am

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sun setting from 3rd floor MS at AES at 6:00 pm and just few minutes after 6:00 pm. Notice that the sun appears to have move just a bit lower.

sunset19sep6pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sunset19septjustafter6

 

 

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19 September Science 7 WOW and Spring Semester Preview–biodiversity in the schoolyard–partner tree

We will use today as a preview/introduction to WOW science where we survey all the different kinds of living thing we see on the trip. We will also preview our second semester which begins with Growth, Development, and Reproduction. These processes take time and we want to have living examples to observe–that’s why we want to start at this time in the year.

You will need to add a sub-folder to your Digital Science Notebook. Call this folder GDR (growth, development, reproduction). In GDR add a sub-folder called Partner Tree.

Tour of the school yard. We will cover as much area as we can. Be on the lookout for a “partner tree.” A tree that will become your friend during the rest of the school year. The only rule we’ll make is that no two people in the class can have the same species (if they are in sight of each other). Your choice is based on an individual tree, but we would also like to have as many different kinds/species represented in our class as possible. We also want to keep an eye out for a good place to put a sparrow nest box.

Take pictures. Make notes. Make a map. Ask questions.

If there is time today (may not be enough because of the short classes), we will get a list of everyone’s tree. Otherwise, we will complete this at a later date. Do not forget.

From now on, keep alert for all the different kinds of living thing you see in your daily life, on weekends, on trips. Bring in any seeds you find–growing wild or in the food you eat (not cooked). We have some planting boxes on the balcony. You can try to grow whatever you bring in.

 

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15 September Science 7 Report on Tumble Buggy Due

Turn in the paper copy of the Tumble Buggy report when requested. Be sure a digital copy is uploaded and well-named in your digital science notebook.

If your report is not ready, please send an email to your parents. Include me (rfrazier@aes.ac.in) in the email. Explain why your report is not ready. Explain when the project was announced and described (look back at the blog). Provide questions you have and discuss what you have done to address those questions. Offer a definite plan on what you will do to turn in the now-late-missing work.

After you turn in your paper, read the information below about the project. Write on lined paper with your name and period a specific self-evaluation of your report. If you think it is meeting, share specific examples. If you think it is not meeting, explain what you need to do to bring it to that level. Do this seriously! Describe your experience with the Tumble Buggy investigation. Do you think it gave you the opportunity to demonstrate what you know about motion and what you can do in order to investigate motion? Be specific. Provide examples.

“Meeting—Includes details of practice and reasoning. Makes accurate measurements. Constructs correct graphs and makes correct calculations (including units). Demonstrates understanding of techniques for acquiring and analyzing data relevant to motion. Demonstrates understanding of the concept of average speed.

Standards

  • Disciplinary Core Ideas
  • Forces and motion
  • Cross-Cutting Concepts
  • Patterns
  • Scale, Proportion, and Quantity
  • Stability and Change
  • Science and Engineering Practices
  • Asking questions and defining problems
  • Planning and Carrying out Investigations
  • Analyzing and Interpreting Data
  • Using mathematics and computational thinking
  • Constructing explanations and designing solutions
  • Engaging in argument from evidence
  • Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information.

After you finish the self-evaluation, write a 5 paragraph reflective post (category Science 7) on your blog. Include a link to your Tumble Buggy Report. Set the sharing of the link to “anyone who has the link.” Ask if you do not know how to do this.

  1. Describe your initial ideas about the science of motion–before we began our class. Describe any changes in your ideas–growth of old ideas, change of old ideas, development of new ideas, etc. Be very specific and use examples. Where is your thinking now? How close do you think your understanding of motion is to a scientist’s? What do you think you need to do to think more like a scientist–hint: look at the cross-cutting concepts and science and engineering practices above?
  2. What activities have been most meaningful to your learning? Why do you think this is the case? What has been most surprising? Why do you / did you find it surprising? What is most interesting to you about motion? Talk specifically about the Tumble Buggy project. To what extent has it helped you think about motion. Give examples. When have you thought about motion outside of the class (since school began)? What are your most burning questions related to motion? What kinds of answer would satisfy your curiosity?
  3. What has been most difficult and challenging for you? What do you think makes it difficult or challenging? What do you think you could specifically do to help you with barriers and challenges to learning about the science of motion?
  4. What do you think will come next in our study of motion? Why do you think this?
  5. What words have you included in your list of science terms related to the study of motion? Describe how you have made, kept up with, and updated this list. What words do you think you should add? How do the words you have on your list and the words you have not included relate to your answers in the questions above.

If you finish all of the above, and there is still time in the class, explore the video sites below and pick out several videos that you would like to share with the class. Save the links in your digital science notebook and write a note to remind you why you picked the ones you did.

Look through the following popular science video sites, see if you can find several that involve motion. Be prepared to share with the class at some future date.

 

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