22 November Science 8 Reflection–Astronomy

  • On lined paper with your name and period, respond to the following. Be sure to turn in a paper copy and to upload a digital copy (photo) to your DSN. Use the following prompts to guide your reflection:
  • Provide several sentences about your learning in science this year. Be specific. These should be things that you would like quoted as a part of report card comments about you.
  • How has your thinking changed? What has been the most amazing thing that you learned? What ideas have you found particularly challenging? Why do you think they are challenging?
  • Talk about your learning habits AND about the ideas and practices in science.
  • Refer to your digital science notebook–to what extent do you keep it complete and up-to-date. Describe the way you use your DSN in projects and assessments.
  • How do you approach an assessment project? For example, how did you make sure that you tried to show how the conservation of mass applied to the reaction you examined and how did you make sure you explained that in your final product?
  • What would you do differently in your assessment project if you were to start over? Explain.
  • How important is it to you to become good at investigation and scientific thinking? Explain.
  • What do you see as the next steps in getting better at scientific investigation and thinking?

***********

ASTRONOMY

Watch the following video. Write a summary. Explain the procedure used. List any questions you have. Read about making the video:

Watch the following videos and write a summary–

History of Astronomy

http://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~thompson/1101/lecture_aristarchus.html

Aristarchus

http://www.astro.cornell.edu/academics/courses/astro201/aristarchus.htm

Eratosthenes

https://www.windows2universe.org/?page=/citizen_science/myw/w2u_eratosthenes_calc_earth_size.html

Mapping from The Ring of Truth   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRY2SkMTafc

Galileo: Height of mountains on the moon https://brunelleschi.imss.fi.it/esplora/cannocchiale/dswmedia/simula/esimula1_1.html

Galileo: The Stary Messenger from The Ascent of Man  http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x334243

Bad Astronomy  http://www.badastronomy.com/bad/index.html

 

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21 November Science 7 Reflections/Comments and then: Energy and Work

Reflections (on lined paper with your name and period ALSO uploaded in your DSN)

  • Provide several sentences about your learning in science this year. Be specific. These should be things that you would like quoted as a part of report card comments about you.
  • How has your thinking changed? What has been the most amazing thing that you learned? What ideas have you found particularly challenging? Why do you think they are challenging?
  • Talk about your learning habits AND about the ideas and practices in science.
  • Refer to your digital science notebook–to what extent do you keep it complete and up-to-date. Describe the way you use your DSN in projects and assessments.
  • How do you approach an assessment project? For example, how did you make sure that you tried to show how the conservation of momentum applied to the catapult and projectile and how did you make sure you explained that in the summary?
  • What would you do differently in your assessment project if you were to start over? Explain.
  • How important is it to you to become good at investigation and scientific thinking?” Explain.
  • What do you see as the next steps in getting better at scientific investigation and thinking?

Science 7 Pulleys–measuring work

In today’s DSN entry, begin with 3-5 sentences about your thoughts on the meaning of energy in science. What do you think are the most important ideas? Why?

Watch this short music video. How do you think energy is involved?

In order to build our ideas about energy, we will examine how forces are applied in pulley systems and how much work goes in and how much comes out. (Energy is the capacity to do work.)

Recall the different relationships between the fundamental quantities: mass, space (distance), time

  • Velocity (speed with direction) = distance/time (Meters/Second)
  • Acceleration = Velocity/time (Meters / Second²)
  • Force = Mass x Acceleration (Kilogram x Meters / Second²) (Newtons)
  • Momentum = Mass x Velocity (Kilogram x Meters / Second)
  • Pressure = Force / Area (Newton / Meter²) (Pascal) (Pounds per square inch-psi; and Bar are units of pressure that are not part of the scientific metric unit system)
  • Work = Force x Distance (Energy is the capacity to do work). (Joules)
  • Power = Work/Time (Force x Distance / Time) (Joules/Second or Watts)

Pulleys are used to make work seem easier.  There are two ways in which a pulley can make work easier.

  1. Pulleys can change the direction of the force
  2. Pulleys can multiply the force applied by spreading it over a longer distance.

There are three main types of pulleys: single – fixed pulley,  single moveable pulley, and   block and tackle – at least one fixed pulley and one moveable pulley in a system.

There are many online references for pulleys. Here is one: http://www.ropebook.com/information/pulley-systems

Build and operate the three systems (see photos). Examine and record the work input and work output of each pulley system and compare them to one another.

PROCEDURE:  Single fixed pulley (see photos)

  1. You will first need to set up a single fixed pulley system as directed by your teacher.
  2. Determine the weight of the object being lifted by attaching it to a Newton spring scale and recording this value in row B.
  3. Attach the weight to one end of a string and run it up and around a single fixed pulley attached to the top bar. Attach the short end of the string to spring scale.
  4. Using a meter stick, note the height at which the spring scale is attached to the string.  Pull on the scale so that it moves at a constant speed and record the reading on the scale in row E.
  5. Move the weight being lifted up .1m (10 cm) from the tabletop to the bottom of the object.  Record this in row C.
  6.  Determine the distance that the scale was moved by subtracting the final reading from the initial reading on the meter stick.  Record this value in row F.
  7. Calculate out the remaining rows using the formulas provided and your data.

Single moveable pulley (see photos)

  1. Tie one end of a string to the top bar.  Run the string through a pulley and attach the other end to a spring scale.
  2. Connect the pulley to the object being lifted and repeat steps 4-8 as you did for the single fixed pulley and record your data in the data table

Block and tackle pulley system (see photos)

  1. Tie a pulley to the top bar.  Loop a string through this pulley.  Tie one end of the string to the top of a second pulley and take the other end and loop it around the second pulley and then tie it to the spring scale.  Connect the weight to the second pulley
  2. Repeat steps 4-8 as you did for the single fixed pulley and record your data in the  data table

Complete the following data table:

A

  Single fixed pulley Single moveable pulley Block and tackle

B

Resistance force-Weight of object being lifted(N)      

C

Resistance distance -Height that the object is lifted(m)

.1 (10cm)

.1 (10cm)

.1 (10cm)

D

Work output (J)              = force x distance(B x C)      

E

Effort force (N) (Reading from spring scale as string is pulled)      

F

Effort Distance    How far scale is moved (m)      

G

Work input (J)    = force x distance (E x F)      

H

Mechanical advantage (B/E)      

I

Efficiency = work output/work input(D/G) x 100      

1.     Which pulley system required the greatest effort force?  Explain why.

2.     Which type of pulley had the greatest mechanical advantage?  Explain why this is.

(HINT:  Think of which system you had to pull the most string through)

3.     What would be an easier way to determine the mechanical advantage of a pulley system?

(HINT:  Think of how many strings are holding up the weight)

4.     Which pulley system was the most efficient?   Is this what you expected?

5.     Explain the best way that a mechanic could pull out a large truck engine by himself using the least possible amount of force.

6.     Try another system with more than 3 pulleys. Record your ideas and your results.

7.     In what sense does the pulley make the work easier?

8.     Design a simple machine (which works) where the input work is less than the output work. If this is not possible, explain why you think so.

A single pulley. Input force is directed down, weight moves up.

Single moveable pulley. Lifting force moves weight upward.

Block and tackle. One moveable pulley and one fixed pulley.  Downward input force lifts weight upward.

Some different ways to think about energy and energy transformations; the development of ideas about energy:

http://www.physics4kids.com/files/thermo_laws.html

http://education.seattlepi.com/everyday-examples-first-second-laws-thermodynamics-4740.html

http://nmsolar.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Energy_Concepts_Primer.pdf

https://www.newscientist.com/blogs/culturelab/2010/07/the-discovery-of-energy.html

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/physics/ancestors-einstein.html

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10-14-16-20 November Science 8 Combining proportions and beginning the summative on chemical reactions.

20 November:

Today is a workday–

You will need (in paper copy AND uploaded correctly in your DSN). Ask if anything about this project is unclear:

  • a final product (see below) (a clear photograph, a link and/or file is needed in addition to any material pieces as your situation warrants)
  • a reflection outlining how each of the learning criteria are met in your final product—how you have “met” or “approached” each of the listed standards with examples drawn from your work. Explain specifically (with examples) how your thinking about matter has grown and changed during the course.

These are due: 22 November. Preferred at beginning of class. Will accept before 2:30 pm. A missing/late assignment may not have the opportunity to revise.

Note: We will begin Astronomy on 22 November. It will not be a day to work on the summative.

Product guidelines

Students may choose how they present and demonstrate their learning. There will be no traditional paper and pencil test.

Possibilities: science fair poster, video, presentation, report, ibook…you may be creative!

Learning criteria for success:

  1. chemical formula or other visual representation of a chemical reaction must be included and explained based on acquired data and observations
  2. chemical formula or other visual representation of a chemical reaction must also demonstrate an understanding that substances are composed of different types of atoms combined in specific ways
  3. demonstrate an understanding of the Law of the Conservation of Mass/Matter and how it is represented in your chemical change investigation
  4. your investigation procedure should be documented in your final product

Standards derived from NGSS:

  • Developing and using models
  • Planning and carrying out investigations
  • Stability and change
  • Chemical Reactions

Work neatly and carefully. Label and organize your data. Make data tables. Think of what you might graph. Ask if you have questions. Be observant. Record your ideas.

Get proposal approved and begin work. Pay attention to the timeline.

Enter your results (one partner needs editing rights): https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/18Jt50llF28iCaoUFURHuSPL71tndF84RII79wU9K1p0/edit?usp=sharing

Begin brainstorming and planning the chemical reactions summative project. See below.

Chemistry Unit Summative Assessment

This assessment is individual though you may work with your most recent partner to develop and implement a plan.

This assessment will take place over the course of 3-4 class days and your own time.

Brainstorm and planning 10 November;

Lab work 14 and 16 November;

Workday 20 November;

Due End of day 22 November

You will need:

  1. a documented AND *approved* plan/proposal (paper and digital in DSN) for the investigation of a particular reaction (or family of reactions) that gathers and analyzes both quantitative and qualitative
  2. a final product (see below) (a clear photograph, a link and/or file is needed in addition to any material pieces as your situation warrants)
  3. a reflection outlining how each of the learning criteria are met in your final product—how you have “met” or “approached” each of the listed standards with examples drawn from your work. Explain specifically (with examples) how your thinking about matter has grown and changed during the course.

General Assessment Guidelines:

  • the investigation must involve or demonstrate a chemical change
  • the investigation portion of the assessment from brainstorming up to the product can be done with a partner or individually
  • the final product must be individual
  • the investigation can be based on previous class activities, but it cannot be identical; the investigation can build on and extend things we have done in class; the investigation can be related to a specific question you have had in connection with a class activity, discussion, or presentation; mining youtube, etc. for ideas is strongly discouraged (connect your idea to the learning criteria, the standards, and the ideas we have introduced and explored in our class)
  • you plan/proposal needs to make clear how your choice is related to what we have done and how you intend to meet the various criteria of the project
  • both quantitative and qualitative data should be gathered from the investigation
  • safety first, both for you and the environment
  • materials must be available and requested in a timely fashion
  • teacher approval required

Plan/proposal: Plan/Proposal:

  • Reaction(s)? You need a clearly expressed research question–naming the reaction(s) and the variables you will examine.
  • Safety?
  • Materials?
  • Procedure plan (flow chart of tasks; timeline; storyboard)?
  • Product plan (flow chart of tasks; timeline; storyboard)?
  • Expectations and why (featuring your knowledge of atoms and molecules)
  • How will you meet criteria for project and for learning?
  • What information–data, graphs, images, etc.–will you need for your product?
  • Additional research on reaction?

Product guidelines

Students may choose how they present and demonstrate their learning. There will be no traditional paper and pencil test.

Possibilities: science fair poster, video, presentation, report, ibook…you may be creative!

Learning criteria for success:

  1. chemical formula or other visual representation of a chemical reaction must be included and explained based on acquired data and observations
  2. chemical formula or other visual representation of a chemical reaction must also demonstrate an understanding that substances are composed of different types of atoms combined in specific ways
  3. demonstrate an understanding of the Law of the Conservation of Mass/Matter and how it is represented in your chemical change investigation
  4. your investigation procedure should be documented in your final product

Standards derived from NGSS:

  • Developing and using models
  • Planning and carrying out investigations
  • Stability and change
  • Chemical Reactions

 

 

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15-17November Science 7 Testing Catapults; Beginning summative

The entire period is available for your to:

  1. Visual explanation / poster
  2. Verbal explanation of your poster (an explanatory caption)
  3. A reflection on your learning about motion

See board from the 15th.

Refer to previous blogpost for details of summative assessment:

http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2017/11/13/13-nov-sci-7-testing-motion-device-beginning-summative-project/

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13 Nov. Sci 7 Testing motion device; Beginning Summative Project

Today we will complete, test, and modify your catapults

On the testing (today or Wednesday). You will have a distance and a target. We will measure the distance of first contact to the closest edge of the target. During the official trials you get two tries. When you launch, describe the operation of your device. Use correct motion concepts. Describe how you tested the device and your reasoning in the original construction and in the modifications.

Observe every launch of every device. Take note of the diversity of designs and how your classmates describe, build, operate, think and reason.

CONSTRUCTING, OPERATING, INVESTIGATING A MOTION DEVICE

Design a catapult that can launch a clay ball into a 0.5m x 0.5m square from at least 3m away.

  • Supplies available in the Makerspace
  • Other materials with permission
  • Clay for projectiles
  • Digital balance
  • Measuring tape / meter sticks
  • With your partner discuss theories on how a catapult works (note it may not employ a slingshot).
  • With your partner, design a catapult that you can make from materials in the Makerspace (you will have one period for construction and trials).Plan an experiment to gather data about how far clay balls of different masses (you will be given a mass range to work within) can be launched by your catapult. You will need to have a data table to record your results.
  • Explain how you will test and trial your catapult. What data will you gather? How will you record it?
  • Construct your catapult with your partner and and begin testing it. How can you improve the initial design? Once you have tested it do you need to make changes to the design? Can you make it more accurate or shoot farther?
  • Take picture of the designing and building process
  • Once everyone has finished construction each team will get two chances to land a clay ball into the square from at least 3m away. You will need to use your trial data to determine where you will place the catapult so that the ball lands in the square. A digital balance will be available to determine the mass of the various clay balls you trial and the one you are given during the competition.
  • You will have one class period to design and build the catapult. Trials will be during the next class period. All catapults will be stored in the classroom to keep them safe.

As you work with your catapult think of how the following concepts apply:

  • Distance
  • Time

  • Speed

  • Velocity

  • Inertia (Newton’s 1st Law)

  • Acceleration

  • Force (Newton’s 2nd Law)

  • Contact and non-contact forces

  • Equal and opposite forces (Newton’s 3rd Law)

  • Momentum and conservation of momentum

  • How could you describe the action of the catapult, the results of systematic trials, and the relevance of ideas about motion (see list above) in a poster that uses no words and now numerals–a totally visual explanation?
  • EVERYTHING IS DUE AT THE END OF CLASS ON FRIDAY 17 NOVEMBER
  • PRODUCT:    Design a (physical) poster (using no words and no numerals) that shows:

  1. What you consider to be a typical catapult launch and flight of the projectile.
  2. The results from your tests of the parameters of performance.
  3. How you tried to hit the target (your thinking and calibrating).
  4. How Newton’s 3 Laws of Motion apply. Consider BOTH the catapult and the projectile. (Think carefully about when the speed/velocity is changing and when it is constant. Think about where forces appear in the launch and flight and identify the paired 3rd law forces).
  5. How the principle of the Conservation of Momentum applies.

Take a clear and focused picture of your poster and upload to your DSN.

Write a summary along with the picture of your poster explaining your poster and upload in your DSN.

Write a reflection after the summary describing what you have learned about motion from working with and observing the catapults. What has surprised you? What questions about motion and catapults do you still have? Record the reflection in your DSN.

  • Upload a photo or video from one of your launches to your DSN.
  • STANDARDS FROM POWERSCHOOL
  • 7.SC.BTH.A.3 – Planning and carrying out investigations
  • 7.SC.BTH.B.7 – 7. Stability and Change
  • 7.SC.BTH.C.1 – PS2.A: Forces and Motion
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9 November Science 7 Change of plans due to bad air outside–the performance of a catapult as the basis for summative assessment

Be sure you are keeping your DSN complete and up-to-date. Complete and up-to-date means all 7 items are included for each class. 

We will postpone rocket launches until the air quality improves. In order to carry on with the spirit of a design and build project that involves aspects of motion that we have been studying, you will:

Design a catapult that can launch a clay ball into a 0.5m x 0.5m square from at least 3m away.

Use:

  • Supplies available in the Makerspace
  • Other materials with permission
  • Clay for projectiles
  • Digital balance
  • Measuring tape / meter sticks
  1. With your partner discuss theories on how a catapult works (note it may not employ a slingshot).
  2. With your partner, design a catapult that you can make from materials in the Makerspace (you will have one period for construction and trials).
  3. Plan an experiment to gather data about how far clay balls of different masses (you will be given a mass range to work within) can be launched by your catapult. You will need to have a data table to record your results.
  4. Explain how you will test and trial your catapult. What data will you gather? How will you record it?
  5. Construct your catapult with your partner and and begin testing it. How can you improve the initial design? Once you have tested it do you need to make changes to the design? Can you make it more accurate or shoot farther?
  6. Take picture of the designing and building process
  • Once everyone has finished construction each team will get two chances to land a clay ball into the square from at least 3m away. You will need to use your trial data to determine where you will place the catapult so that the ball lands in the square. A digital balance will be available to determine the mass of the various clay balls you trial and the one you are given during the competition.
  • You will have one class period to design and build the catapult. Trials will be during the next class period. All catapults will be stored in the classroom to keep them safe.

As you work with your catapult think of how the following concepts apply:

  • Distance
  • Time
  • Speed
  • Velocity
  • Inertia (Newton’s 1st Law)
  • Acceleration
  • Force (Newton’s 2nd Law)
  • Contact and non-contact forces
  • Equal and opposite forces (Newton’s 3rd Law)
  • Momentum and conservation of momentum

How could you describe the action of the catapult, the results of systematic trials, and the relevance of ideas about motion (see list above) in a poster that uses no words and now numerals–a totally visual explanation?

 

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8 November Science 8 Exploring combining proportions in a chemical reaction; preview of summative assessment

Pick a partner that you have worked with the least so far this year. Be sure your partner list is complete and up-to-date. This will be your partner through the summative assessment. The full description of the summative will be presented this coming Friday.

Problem:

What are the combining proportions of vinegar and baking soda (5% solution of acetic acid and water and sodium hydrogen carbonate–see the chemical formulae and the ball and stick models) that react completely?

React completely means that all the acetic acid is transformed AND all the sodium hydrogen carbonate is transformed.

Design an efficient procedure to address the question. Carry out the procedure. Work/measure/record carefully. Keep complete, well-labelled, well-organized records.

How will you know that you have reached the endpoint of the reaction and that no acetic acid is left AND no sodium hydrogen carbonate is left?

Try to compare your experimental findings with the prediction made by looking at the “molecular weights” using the ball and stick model of the reaction.

Relate your findings to previous experiments to find the mass of the carbon dioxide released from the reaction when certain amounts of sodium hydrogen carbonate were used.

A big part of understanding chemical reactions is keeping track of the atoms. Since we cannot see or really count individual atoms (too small and too many), measuring mass is the method that is used. (Look into the history of the discovery of combining proportions: https://courses.lumenlearning.com/boundless-chemistry/chapter/history-of-atomic-structure/ )

How does the fact that pure substances react with definite proportions by mass support the Atomic Theory of Matter, that is, the grand explanation based on the properties and behaviors of atoms and molecules?

The history of chemistry is a fascinating subject. Here are a couple of episodes from The Ascent of Man, which was an award-winning TV series about the history of science. These episodes will help you understand what the major ideas are and how these critical ideas were discovered and developed. They should also stimulate new questions for you:

When you are finished, identify a question of interest to you (and your partner) that has its origin in something we have done, seen, or talked about in class.

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7 November Science 7 WOW science reflection and the design and construction of air pressure water rockets

Make a new document in your Biodiversity folder in your DSN. For 20 minutes, write about the nature/river walk and stream science during WOW. You may use the following prompts to help you write. You may also use a picture from the stream science or nature/river walk to illustrate your piece of writing. You may use the style of creative non-fiction or poetry.

Describe things you saw that you had never seen before. What did you notice about the landscape and your location? What are some of the different living things (plant, animal, fungi) that you encountered? What is your understanding of the life cycle of the immature (larval) insects we caught in the stream? Describe insights and ideas you had never thought about before with regard to living things and the environment. What was most amazing to you–most beautiful? Why?

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B7o8voJ_anqvNmN0Y0oyUTBHT3M?usp=sharing

*************************

For the next 60 minutes.

With a new partner:

  1. Discuss your theories of how a rocket launches and fires. Include both sketches and words.
  2. Design a rocket with drawings and words that you could make from the plastic bottles. There is a sample, simple rocket in the classroom.
  3. Plan a simple experiment you could try (every team will be guaranteed 2 launch attempts).
  4. Explain the reasoning behind your experiment and predict what you think will happen. Be sure to spell out the reasons for your expectation. Use your scientific understanding of motion.
  5. Explain what you will try to observe about the performance of the rocket and how you will make the observations. Be sure to explain clearly what you are trying to test.
  6. Construct your rocket. You may use 2 complete, intact bottles. You may use any of the scraps to fashion and attach the rocket. Be very careful cutting plastic. You must ask an adult to start the cut on any intact bottle. Duct tape works well to attach features to the rocket. Use masking tape to make a label for the rocket with your names and period.
  7. Take plenty of pictures and notes documenting your design and construction process. These records should appear in your DSN entry for today.
  8. Share your design and ideas for testing with the rest of the class.

You may wish to consult the following links:

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6 November Science 8

I hope you all had a wonderful WOW trip. I look forward to reading your reflection (see below).

Read the entire blog post below. Work individually. Keep to the time guidelines (use your timers with a low volume alarm; include your actual time working in your notes). Consult with Dr. F and show what you accomplish. Your work will appear in the Matter Folder, the Astronomy Folder, the Earth Systems Folder, and the Human Impact Folder.

  • Spend 40 minutes of today’s class reviewing all we have done with the study of matter. You may consult your notes and the class blog:
  • Be sure to update your table linking the different things we have observed to explanations based on the existence of atoms and molecules that have certain properties and behave in certain ways. Explain how the observations serve as evidence for The Atomic Theory of Matter.
  •  Matter
    LARGE SCALE OBSERVATIONS
    LINKING EVIDENCE
    ATOMIC-MOLECULAR SCALE STRUCTURES AND BEHAVIORS
    DATA
    ARGUMENT
    THEORY
  • Use the ball and stick models to illustrate the reaction between acetic acid and sodium hydrogen carbonate. Practice manipulating the “atoms” and “bonds” so you can carry out the steps of the reaction without referring to pictures or the formula. Create your own pictures or animation of the reaction.
  • Use your periodic table to find the atomic weight of each atom in the acetic acid and in the sodium hydrogen carbonate. Also add the weights of the atom to find the “molecular weight” of each reactant molecule. You may round the weights to the nearest whole number. You may want to investigate how the atomic weights are determined. Now, think about the model reaction: How many molecules of acetic acid will react completely with a molecule of sodium hydrogen carbonate? (The ratio is 1 molecule of acetic acid for each molecule of sodium hydrogen carbonate.) What is the ratio of weights of molecular weights of the reactants in a complete reaction?
  • (http://periodic.lanl.gov/use.shtml)
  • Think of how you could carry out a procedure with the actual substances to find out how much vinegar (a solution of 5 % acetic acid) it would take to completely react with a measured sample of sodium hydrogen carbonate (say, 1 gram). How will you know the when the reaction is complete? When you reach the point where you think all the vinegar has reacted and all the sodium hydrogen carbonate has reacted, how will you confirm that you have reached the end point? What test would you perform and how would you perform it? When you determine the ratio of vinegar that completely reacts with 1 gram of sodium hydrogen carbonate, how could you compare your result to the predicted ratio using atomic numbers and the model of the reaction?
  • Spend 20 minutes of todays class reviewing your notebook entry for the preparation we did for your WOW trip. Add your reflections on your experience with the river and the various phenomena associated with water flowing on the landscape. Begin writing a piece of creative (scientific) non-fiction or of (scientific) poetry that is built from your experience, reflection, and understanding of water and landscape.
  • Spend 15 minutes looking at your human impact topic. Write your initial thoughts (as a brainstorm) of the topic. Do not look at any references. Write at least 10 substantive sentences that you suspect are important and true about your topic. Rank them in order from most important to least. Make a list of questions that you have. These questions can help guide your investigative research.
  • Spend 5 minutes reviewing your moon observations. What did you notice during WOW? How can you explain: The phases, the connection between the phase and the time of rising and setting, the change of angle made between an earth bound observers arms when one is pointing to the sun and one is pointing to the moon as the moon changes phases.
  • See the photos below:

29 October 2017 Shivpuri, upstream from Rishikesh just before sunset and just after dark.

30 October 2017 at Shivpuri just upstream from Rishikesh just after dark–around the same time as photo above.

31 October (Halloween) at Himalayan Bear Stream Camp on the Huel, a tributary of the Ganges just upstream from Rishikesh and down stream from Shivpuri. Time 8:30 pm or thereabouts.

1 November 2017 at Shivpuri just upstream from Rishikesh. Just after dark.

3 November 2017 at Jarrar, Uttar Pradesh, Mela Kothi, Chambal Safari Lodge 9:30 pm or thereabouts.

4 November 2017 full moon (Kartik Purnima) around 8:00 pm at Jarrar, Uttar Pradesh, Mela Kothi, Chambal Safari Lodge.

Show Dr. F your work from above.

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27 October Science 7–WOW 7 Preparation–a diversity survey

Review last class:   How to use binoculars properly.

A scheme for observing living things–example: The 7 S’s for bird watching.

Review: the_art_of_birding_part__2 or the_art_of_birding_part__2

  • What kind of observational scheme would be useful for trees or spiders?
  • Try do develop a scheme for a group of living things you might encounter on the WOW 7 trip.

How many times have you seen ants in your life? Make an estimate.

How many kinds (species) of ant do you think there are on the AES campus.

On a clean sheet of paper in landscape orientation, sketch what you think an ant looks like. Fill the space.

On the back of the sheet, write your full name and period.

How many kinds of spider do you think can be found in the AES rocks? Why?

How many of each kind? Where can spiders be found? How do various spiders capture prey?

Learn several techniques for capturing specimens of small (usually invertebrate) creatures. Then observe, describe (in writing–think of an observational scheme), sketch, photograph (if you can), video (if you can) (please send me any clearly focused photographs and videos), and release your specimen unharmed. Do your utmost to avoid causing any harm to the creatures in the process of catching and observing.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=3917635422847&l=1097fb07fd

Keep a list and count of each kind of spider you find. (If you find other invertebrates, you may also add them to a different list.) Only small specimens need to be observed with the magiscopes. If you catch a specimen that is too large for the magiscope, you may use the hand lense and your unaided eye.

Spiders from the Middle School Rocks in past years–and more: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10207430262498256.1073741902.1338342884&type=1&l=d15ed4251f

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