18 January Science 7 Flowers and Partner Trees

  1. Mindful moment: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUeEnkjKyDs
  2. Check previous class.
  3. Preview today’s plan.
  4. Prepare DSN.
  5. Questions

Examine these links:

flowersofindia.net

Understanding botanical names: http://flowersofindia.net/misc/bot_names.html

Flower Parts  http://flowersofindia.net/misc/flower_parts.html

Flower Shapes http://flowersofindia.net/flowershapes/

Leaf Types http://flowersofindia.net/leafshapes/

  • * * * *

We will take a flower diversity walk. Get a mask and jacket/sweater if you need them.

  • How many kinds of flower can we see?
  • What trees are blooming?
  • Find as many different types/shapes/forms of flower as you can.
  • Match them to the types in the website above.
  • Use pictures, sketches, and verbal descriptions.
  • Are any fruits visible?
  • Let’s collect some seeds if we can find them.
  • What animals do we see visiting the flowers.

Visit your partner tree (Stay focused. This is an individual activity. When you think you have finished, check with Dr. F and show the results of today’s observations.)

  • Record verbal and visual observations.
  • What kind of leaf does your partner tree have? Observe in detail.
  • How are the leaves arranged? Observe in detail.
  • Estimate the height of your particular specimen.
  • How many specimens of your partner tree species have you noticed on campus?
  • Where are they?
  • What changes have you noticed since your last observation? How much time has passed? How do the conditions today compare to the initial day of observation?
  • Take pictures.
  • Make sketches.
  • Note date, time, conditions, etc.

Class ends at 9:45 Period 3 and 11:10 Period 4. Listen to directions.

Let’s begin watching Sexual Encounters of the Floral Kind

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4b35nYXVNKI&t=77s

Make notes on examples. List your questions.

 

 

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17 January Science 8 Annotations, Origins and chemical reactions, Carbon

  1. Mindful moment. <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUeEnkjKyDs>
  2. Review previous class.
  3. Preview blog
  4. Prepare DSN.
  5. Questions.

*****

Share annotations from Mongabay and Yale E360 articles.

  • * * * *

Read this recent news item from Science magazine:  How an ancient cataclysm may have jump-started life on Earth

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/01/how-ancient-cataclysm-may-have-jump-started-life-earth >

What are the connections among our study of matter, astronomy, and earth cycles? What do you understand of the article? What are your questions?

Follow this method of reading a difficult text. This method focuses on what you DO Understand and not on what you do not understand. Even if you only follow a fraction of the meaning, your understanding will grow. By using your questions, you will direct your mind toward essential ideas. This method works for anyone. But you must read straight through and summarize. While this may seem time-consuming, it is very effective. Your reading and understanding will begin to grow. If you keep it up, the growth will even accelerate.

  1. Read two or three paragraphs at a time straight through. Do not stop to look up words.
  2. After reading the selected section of the article, write a summary without looking at the article. Write major questions that you have.
  3. Reread the section. Look up only words that you think are critical for understanding.
  4. Add to your summary. Do not erase or delete
  5. Share and compare with a partner or trio from your most recent group.
  6. Continue with this process for the rest of the article.

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/01/how-ancient-cataclysm-may-have-jump-started-life-earth

Prepare an annotation.

Discuss with the entire class.

*****

You will be assigned to a group to review and analyze references related to Carbon and the Carbon Cycle (everyone watch this short video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nzImo8kSXiU). Think of the ways that carbon is a building material in nature and in human technology and the ways carbon is a fuel. Be careful about using the term “carbon” to designate any carbon compound. That can lead to confusion. For example, carbon dioxide is a compound of the elements carbon and oxygen. Sometime’s people abbreviate the discussion and use the term carbon without clarifying that they are referring to carbon dioxide. Remember that the properties of elements are not the same as the properties of the compounds (molecules) they make.

Work together to help each other examine, analyze, and try to understand your cluster of references. Identify important concepts–big ideas and significant details. Identify essential terms–discuss what they could mean from the context–rather than look up definitions that may be out of context. Identify questions you have and that your classmates are likely to have. Which parts of your references may prove confusing for your classmates? Why do you think so?

Prepare a 5 minute presentation based on your references that captures the main ideas and significant supporting examples. Find out what you can about the background of the references. (Who, how, what, why, etc.) Discuss how the references relate to what you already know about matter. Present the most important questions that you and your group have. What do you and your group suspect the point of view of the author(s) to be? Why? Identify bridges AND barriers to deeper understanding of the topic.

Group 1

Carbon

Group 2

Group 3

It’s All about Carbon

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16 January Science 7 Tomato questions, Forms of Flowers, Partner Trees

  1. Mindful moments. Take a few minutes to focus on your breathing.
  2. Noticing plants, growing plants can make you happy and healthy: <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-ZXH9FvYLY> and <http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/WI_VegRegrowing.pdf>
  3. Review previous class.
  4. Read today’s blogpost.
  5. Prepare DSN entry for today in GDR / Biodiversity folder.
  6. Questions.

Quiz

Answer on lined paper where you have written your name and period in the upper right-hand corner. Take a photo when the quiz ends and upload into your DSN.

You may use the blog, your DSN, and the articles. You may NOT use wikipedia, domyhomeworkformebecausei’mlazy.com, or other websites. You may use a translator as a last resort if you are learning English. Try, however, to make your best inferences from what you do know and from the context.

During the last class, you observed cherry tomato plants growing on the balcony. You were also directed to the following article and instructions.

An interesting article about: The Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L., Solanaceae) and Its Botanical Relatives

Read/browse/look at the heading and figures/check the introduction and the conclusion–what do you already know about tomatoes? what do you learn from looking at the article? what questions do you have? Discuss in the next class. (Quiz?)

https://www.springer.com/cda/content/document/cda_downloaddocument/9783662533871-c2.pdf?SGWID=0-0-45-1595649-p180239983

Another article: The Inca Road: Why Is This Wild, Pea-Sized Tomato So Important?
<https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/why-wild-tiny-pimp-tomato-so-important-180955911/>

Quiz:

  1. What did you know about the tomato before looking at the article(s)? Describe your experience with tomatoes.
  2. What did you learn from examining the article(s)? What parts did you look at? What parts did you read? How much time did you spend with the article(s)?
  3. What questions arose as you examined the article(s)?
  4. How do you think you can investigate the questions you have raised?
  5. What do you think a scientific name is? What is the history of scientists making names for living things?
  6. What do you think a botanical relative is? What characteristics are used to decide how closely related plants are to one another? How do you think plants are classified into groups?
  7. What do you think the word species means? Genus?
  8. How many times do the words diverse and diversity appear in the article(s)? What do these words refer to?
  9. How do you think scientists explain the facts of biodiversity–the fact that there are many kinds of living thing and that living things vary in the degrees to which they are similar and different?
  10. What plants are members of the plant family Solanaceae? (Sometimes this plant family goes by the English name “Nightshade.” Which of these plants are familiar to you?
  • * * * *

Examine these links:

flowersofindia.net

Understanding botanical names: http://flowersofindia.net/misc/bot_names.html

Flower Parts  http://flowersofindia.net/misc/flower_parts.html

Flower Shapes http://flowersofindia.net/flowershapes/

Leaf Types http://flowersofindia.net/leafshapes/

  • * * * *

Depending on time,

Visit your partner tree and make observations verbal and visual, take pictures, make sketches, noting date, time, conditions, etc.

Along the way, see if you can find any other trees in flower.

Along the way, find as many different types/shapes/forms of flower as you can. Match them to the types in the website above. Use pictures, sketches, and verbal descriptions.

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15 January 2019 Science 8 Earth Cycles and Human Impact on the Environment

  1. Mindful moment.
  2. Preview today’s blogpost.
  3. Prepare DSN entry for today. (Anticipatory statements).
  4. DSN folders you need to have = Matter; Astronomy; Earth Cycles; Human Impact.
  5. DSN documents you need to have besides class entries: List of partners, projects, dates, reflections. List of new words and terms. Annotated reference list for this semester.
  6. Questions.
  7. Stories from the break.
  • * * * *

To help us with the Carbon Cycle and the key process of Photosynthesis:

  • Bring in any seeds you can find and we will plant them.
  • From uncooked/unprocessed ripe fruits and vegetables.
  • From plants growing in gardens, parks, wild. These could be from trees, weeds, any that you find.
  • Be sure to identify, photograph, describe the source.
  • * * * *

10 minutes as individuals:

Do not use the internet–only use your own mind and memory. Make a list of environmental issues you have heard about. Describe what you know about each issue. List the questions you have. In your list of issues, what concerns you the most? Why?

20 minutes in small groups:

Share your list of issues among the group. Compare. Make a list with the top ten from the group. List in order of interest and/or importance. Include what you (as a group) know or think you know. Include your questions. Be prepared to present your thoughts to the rest of the class.

20 minutes as whole class:

Summarize both the small group and large group discussions in your entry for the DSN in the Human Impact folder. Consider putting a copy of the entry in the Earth Cycle folder as well. (How are human caused environmental problems related to earth cycles?)

  • * * * *

Whole class list of issues

Period 5

<https://docs.google.com/document/d/1V0ZmDyIUQpwPJfG5-FbeYPYuQccos_cYM0Pjjjxunig/edit?usp=sharing>

Period 7

<https://docs.google.com/document/d/1J7LEkK7XpvXOD98m5z83gtbCaxOZF6QUHAjAzvQRQf0/edit?usp=sharing>

Period 8

<https://docs.google.com/document/d/1PlNFirDvkbCWjm7ttRdqyhHrbYI82fVqMTpOzLxIrpk/edit?usp=sharing>

In one of the classes, someone mentioned war. Just saw this article:

Saving snow leopards in a war zone:  Conflict and conservation became unlikely bedfellows in Afghanistan

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-00125-w

20 minutes

Investigate these two environmental websites and sign-up for email updates from both:

Mongabay

https://news.mongabay.com/

https://mongabay.us14.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=80161fe385606408293ae0e51&id=940652e1f4

Yale Environment 360

https://e360.yale.edu/

https://e360.yale.edu/newsletter

Search both websites for any articles related to environmental problems identified today–in your own mind, in your small group, and/or in the class / large group.

Create a document called References for Earth Cycles and Human Impact on the Environment.

Record the articles (1 from each site) and make an annotation for each.

A couple of other websites of interest (you can also subscribe):

Yale Climate Connections  <https://www.yaleclimateconnections.org/>

Because so much of the news about our environment is depressing and scary, this website offers some hope:  The New Climate–Uplifting stories for uncertain times  <https://thenewclimate.com/>

Annotation format:

  • Bibliographic information in MLA or APA citation style. Complete and consistent.
  • Description of resource (context, type, etc.);
  • Summary of main ideas and important details;
  • Assessment of quality, validity, reliability, point of view, etc.;
  • Your reaction–what it makes you think of, what questions you have, how you feel about the implications of the ideas, facts, argument.

* * * *

Next class:

Share annotations from Mongabay and Yale E360 articles.

  • * * * *

Read this recent news item from Science magazine:  How an ancient cataclysm may have jump-started life on Earth

What are the connections among our study of matter, astronomy, and earth cycles? What do you understand of the article? What are your questions?

Follow this method of reading a difficult text. This method focuses on what you DO Understand and not on what you do not understand. Even if you only follow a fraction of the meaning, your understanding will grow. By using your questions, you will direct your mind toward essential ideas. This method works for anyone. But you must read straight through and summarize. While this may seem time-consuming, it is very effective. Your reading and understanding will begin to grow. If you keep it up, the growth will even accelerate.

  1. Read two or three paragraphs at a time straight through. Do not stop to look up words.
  2. After reading the selected section of the article, write a summary without looking at the article. Write major questions that you have.
  3. Reread the section. Look up only words that you think are critical for understanding.
  4. Add to your summary.
  5. Continue with this process for the rest of the article.

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/01/how-ancient-cataclysm-may-have-jump-started-life-earth

We will discuss in the next class. Be sure you have your summaries, questions, and critical/essential new words. (Quiz?)

****

 

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14 January 2019 Science 7 Begin Growth, Development, Reproduction and Personal Inquiry Project

  1. Mindful moment.
  2. Preview today’s blogpost.
  3. Prepare DSN entry for today. (Anticipatory statements).
  4. DSN folders you need to have = Motion; Energy; Biodiversity or GDR; Natural Selection or Evolution; Partner Tree; PIP.
  5. DSN documents you need to have besides class entries: List of partners, projects, dates, reflections. List of new words and terms.
  6. Questions.
  7. Stories from the break.

*****

  • Bring in any seeds you can find and we will plant them.
  • From uncooked/unprocessed ripe fruits and vegetables.
  • From plants growing in gardens, parks, wild. These could be from trees, weeds, any that you find.
  • Be sure to identify, photograph, describe the source.

*****

Step out onto the balcony and observe the cherry tomato plants. Describe, sketch, photograph the flowers and fruits. This plant is from seeds from plants grown last year which were grown from plants the year before and so on.

An interesting article about: The Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L., Solanaceae) and Its Botanical Relatives

Read/browse/look at the heading and figures/check the introduction and the conclusion–what do you already know about tomatoes? what do you learn from looking at the article? what questions do you have? Discuss in the next class. (Quiz?)

https://www.springer.com/cda/content/document/cda_downloaddocument/9783662533871-c2.pdf?SGWID=0-0-45-1595649-p180239983

Another article: The Inca Road: Why Is This Wild, Pea-Sized Tomato So Important?
<https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/why-wild-tiny-pimp-tomato-so-important-180955911/>

*****

Personal Inquiry Project (PIP) 

See below for details:

Today, write a proposal for your personal inquiry project (pip) is made that identifies–need a digital copy of the proposal and a paper copy. Must be finished by the end of class:

  • Something you are interested in that is related to  scientific concepts, ideas, practices from our Science 7 curriculum
  • Challenging Problem or Question
  • Key Knowledge, Understanding, and Skills needed for success
  • Sources of personal interest and motivation
  • The methods, techniques, procedures, etc. that you imagine you will use during your inquiry
  • The kind of product you are considering
  • A timeframe
  • Indications/criteria for success

Personal Inquiry Project (PIP)

During the coming semester, you will need to conduct a Personal Inquiry Project.

There are only a few requirements:

  • The project should be something that interests you and motivates you very much.
  • The project should be related to some idea(s) and/or some practice(s) that are part of Science 7
  • (Motion; Energy; Growth-Development-Reproduction / Biodiversity; Natural Selection-Adaptation / Evolution).
  • You should be able to provide rationale for the connection of your PIP to the Science 7 curriculum.
  • The PIP should involve significant firsthand experience and original thought/work.
  • The PIP will be presented to the school community (including parents) at the end of the year. Thus, it will need certain components. The details of the presentation / publication of projects will be determined through collaborative discussion with each student. The expectation is that the quality of the presentation / publication will be high.
  • A written description/explanation of the project will be required.
  • A written reflection including specified points will be required.
  • Students need to keep a record/log of relevant activity (time spent—sequence and course of research/investigation)
  • Students need to conduct analysis of both the data AND the research/creative experience.
  • Students need to create an annotated reference list.
  • The presentation/publication can take various forms: Report, Poster/Presentation (paper and/or digital), Portfolio-Exhibit.
  • For the showcase student need to create a display (model/artifacts/collection, etc.)
  • There is the possibility that the PIP will be included in Power School (especially regarding scientific practices as well as cross-cutting concepts and disciplinary core ideas).
  • Although some time will be provided during class, most of the time for the research and composition will come outside of class. There will be checkpoints along the way.

There are a multitude of possibilities (each would need to be documented in a thorough and appropriate way):

  • An original experimental research project.
  • An original naturalistic field study research project.
  • Original creative non-fiction based on firsthand observations and experiences.
  • Original creative fiction based on firsthand observations and experiences.
  • Original poetic writing based on firsthand observations and experiences.
  • Original art based on firsthand observations and experiences.
  • Original photography/videography based on firsthand observations and experiences (also micro-,time-lapse, slow-motion).
  • An original collection / display / exhibit like something curated for a museum.
  • A service project (there are many possibilities here from working with children to enhancing the environment to advocacy for some action). There are opportunities with “Science Corps.”
  • An original invention, construction, or engineering investigation.
  • An original project that investigates cultural aspects of a science related topic (ethnobotany / ethnobiology possibilities are rich in India; traditional motion toys collected, built, performance investigated).
  • An original project that investigates practices that people might not immediately associate with science (food and cooking, for example).
  • An idea that you propose and for which you provide a convincing rationale.

Some examples–there are so many possibilities:

  • Year-long creative writing in science by two 7th graders
  • todrift
  • Art-Science projects in Science 7 at AES
  • scienceart
  • Service project for the environment and the visually impaired by Singapore American School students
  • legacyfrazier

Sustained creative writing in science by two middle schoolers

  •             Motion is when an object is moving. It doesn’t necessarily have to be going somewhere. When an object in motion hits another object it results in impact. The size of impact depends on the size of the objects colliding. Without motion, the universe wouldn’t be here. Nothing could ever happen without motion.
  •             To measure the motion of an object, I think you need the distance of travel, time of travel, velocity, force/momentum, and a relative point. You need a relative point because if an object is just moving through space, there is no point for it to move closer or farther from. If an object is just moving through nothing (open space), where it ends up later will be exactly where it ends up later will be exactly like where it started. So basically it hasn’t moved at all.
  •             Einstein’s theory of relativity has much to do with motion. Can time stand still if you move away from a clock/time at the speed of light? The way this works is the time travels from the clock to your eyes at the speed of light. So if you move away from the light which carries the time to you…wouldn’t time stand still? If this true, would it be possible to go back in time if you travel faster than the speed of light? The only way to find out is to try it and experiment. I doubt these experiments with time travel will occur very soon. Humans are far from travel even close to the speed of light.
  •             A centerfielder judging a fly ball is my specialty. My favorite sport is baseball and I know pretty well how players judge the ball. Seventy-five percent of judging is seeing the acceleration of the ball off the bat and determining if it is low or high ball. A hard, low ball would reach it’s highest point in about one second. It is quite amazing how fast the ball can accelerate into the air. I think in races, acceleration is a key part to winning. It’s a key part in motion!

A Tennis Ball in Space vs. A Tennis Ball on Earth

I wrote this for our unit on motion and how gravity affects our everyday life. (Note: The first line is a tennis ball in space, the second line is a tennis ball on Earth, the third line is a tennis ball in space, the fourth line is a tennis ball on Earth, etc.)

  • Gliding to be free to drift wherever you please,
  • Gliding in a designated path.
  • Tracing your thoughts,
  • Tracing the thoughts of the arm that directed you.
  • Knowing you will always drift and will never end,
  • Knowing you will eventually hit the ground with a thud ending all movement.
  • With the whole universe to explore,
  • With the whole planet to explore but not by your choices.
  • Sensing the danger of a black hole,
  • Sensing the danger of a playful puppy.
  • Loneliness of being the only tennis ball in space,
  • Loneliness of being the only thing flying.
  • Being able to not feel anything for there is nothing near you,
  • Being able to feel people’s hands and anything that touches you.
  • Many other items that feels as strange as you,
  • Many other tennis balls.
  • Random and spontaneous.
  • Precise and assured.
  • Free.

The Personal Inquiry Project: Inquire, Build, Create, Invent, Do, Serve

Project Based Learning is a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to an authentic, engaging and complex question, problem, or challenge. Essential Project Design Elements include:

  • Key Knowledge, Understanding, and Success Skills – The project is focused on student learning goals, including standards-based content and skills such as critical thinking/problem solving, collaboration, and self-management.
  • Challenging Problem or Question– The project is framed by a meaningful problem to solve or a question to answer, at the appropriate level of challenge.
  • Sustained Inquiry– Students engage in a rigorous, extended process of asking questions, finding resources, and applying information.
  • Authenticity– The project features real-world context, tasks and tools, quality standards, or impact – or speaks to students’ personal concerns, interests, and issues in their lives.
  • Student Voice & Choice– Students make some decisions about the project, including how they work and what they create.
  • Reflection– Students and teachers reflect on learning, the effectiveness of their inquiry and project activities, the quality of student work, obstacles and how to overcome them.
  • Critique & Revision– Students give, receive, and use feedback to improve their process and products.
  • Public Product Students make their project work public by explaining, displaying and/or presenting it to people beyond the classroom.

The project involves:

  • Significant, original, first-hand experience. (original/first-hand research, construction, creative efforts, action, service) (The firsthand experiential aspect is essential. Primarily conducting second-hand research does not address the criteria for this project.)
  • Sustained Inquiry (timeline proposed and followed)
  • A Level of commitment that is enacted
  • Communication with parents on the student’s level of commitment and level of engagement and effort
  • Support of parents

The project is:

  • Authentic
  • Based on Student’s Voice & Choice

The project includes:

  • Genuine, Deep, Insightful, Coherent Reflection

Students engage in:

  • Critique & Revision
  • On-going communication with teacher, peers, parents on the progress of the project

The project results in

  • A Public Product to be determined through the proposal and project processes

ArtScience (see this link: artscience1415)

You should be able to explain clearly what your creation has to do with our study of motion (position, time, speed, velocity, acceleration, force, Newton’s Laws of Motion, inertia, etc.). (A POOR connection would be to say something like, “We made a painting and it has to do with motion because we had to move the paintbrush.”)

Consider this question as a way to relate originality/creativity in art and discovering/inventing in science: How does your work show both you AND the viewer something that is not already known?

See this article: scienceart

Video, pictures, and reflection on one project from the past:

http://18srajesh.18blogs.aes.ac.in/grade-7/science/portfolio/swining-art-motion-project/and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tZQ4014SFgM

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Check out this science-art picture from the AES website: https://www.facebook.com/AmericanEmbassySchoolNewDelhi/photos/a.384454041722974.1073741828.337997143035331/397055197129525/?type=1 

Walking camel

walkingcamel

Clacker

clacker

Young inventors

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19 December Science 7 Campus Trees; Partner Tree selection

  • Mindful moment
  • Reflect on study of motion and energy–what questions remain?
  • See today’s blogpost
  • Prepare DSN to go into the partner tree folder in your biodiversity folder (anticipatory statements–you will need to make sketches and take pictures and write descriptions)
  • Questions

* * * * *

Select partner trees.

Visit partner trees.

Make and record observations of partner trees on Day 0.

Begin list of the kinds of information you want to gather from firsthand observation and from consulting other references. Do the preliminary thinking you will need to be organized. Plan for systematic and periodic observation of your partner tree. Today will be Day 0 of your observations. Note date, time, conditions, etc. Make sure you can find your partner tree again. Distinguish between the particular tree, which we will call specimen, and the kind of tree, which we will call species.

http://flowersofindia.net

http://flowersofindia.net/leafshapes/

http://flowersofindia.net/flowershapes/

Regarding the names of plants, find some time to watch “A Confusion of Names” from Botany: A Blooming History <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cVDpdmlpZKw>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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18 December Science 8–Are we alone? Science in popular culture? A scientist writes fiction?

Mindful moment–review and reflect on previous DSN entry and blogpost–Letter from the Earth. What is special about our “pale blue dot?” (See Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan):

  • Take 5 minutes to do this:
  • Remember to upload material (excerpts from your writing, photos and sketches with captions/explanations, video links (accessible by everyone)) to this folder for parent newsletter #2. Need pictures of students in action–chemical reactions project, scale model solar system, sun earth moon model. Start with Chemical reaction summative through Astronomy scale model, Sun Earth Moon Model, extraterrestrial intelligence. You need to be represented in the newsletter: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1eUDDiBpks6wN0IWB5iu0gAHAVbL-4Qlr?usp=sharing

See other references to the work of Carl Sagan in the previous blog.

  • * * * *

Messages sent into space

* * * * *

The movie Contact (based on the Novel Contact by Carl Sagan)

List your questions.

* * * * *

References posted in previous blogpost:

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17 December Science 7 Showing the energy transformation systems, devices, sculptures

  • Mindful moment.
  • Review previous class and notes.
  • Preview today’s blogs.
  • Prepare today’s DSN. Anticipatory statements. NEED TO FINISH DSN for each class.
  • Send photos, sketches, and excerpts about energy–and especially about recent project.
  • *  * * * *

Set up your system, device, sculpture (30 minutes)

Demonstrate and explain (5 minutes per group)

Put away materials

Listen to the following Podcasts. Make a list of new ideas and your questions.

The Sun: Our Star

https://drive.google.com/file/d/16nfPtqmOvmSsZbzrf3MU9l7xN6m5aoTR/view?usp=sharing

The Sun: Our Star-Energy

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1BngP3_Z5yNvbOLuBaPTD2SrOXIQowU_q/view?usp=sharing

 

 

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14 December Science 8–Letter from the earth to an intelligent alien

  • Mindful moment.
  • Previous class–questions?
  • Preview today’s blog.
  • Prepare DSN entry. Copy and paste url for today’s blogpost. Write anticipatory statements for each item in the DSN entry for today.
  • Questions (from the Sun-Moon-Earth system; from today’s plan)
  • Share and read anticipatory statements.
  • * * * *

Spend some quiet moments thinking. What do you find special about the earth? What do you think your parents found special? Your grandparents? Your great grandparents? And so on? What do you think your children (or your nieces and nephews or your friends’ children) will find special? Their children?

Now assume it is your privilege and responsibility to craft a letter from earth that will be sent to an “extraterrestrial intelligence.” What would you say? What would you include? Take 10 minutes to brainstorm by yourself and 20 minutes to compose your letter. Assume that it can be translated into a “language” that would be understood by the ET Intelligent being. You may indicate additional information you would like to include but let us limit it to 1 gigabyte. <https://lowdown.carphonewarehouse.com/how-to/data-test-how-much-is-1gb/29283/>.

Upload your letter into your DSN entry for today. AND upload to:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1s2w7Nxh25uqSvqXWBUsLOOIObTB59tJw?usp=sharing

This activity will serve as a bridge into our big topics for spring semester:

Earth Systems/Earth Cycles and Human Impact on the Earth

  • * * * *

Themes for today and next week:

  • What is special about the Earth?
  • Science and Astronomy in popular culture
  • The question of extra-terrestrial life and extra-terrestrial intelligence
  • 1st contact in science fiction and in history
  • Science and Society
  • * * * * *

Remember to upload material (excerpts from your writing, photos and sketches with captions/explanations, video links (accessible by everyone)) to this folder for parent newsletter #2. Start with Chemical reaction summative through Astronomy scale model, Sun Earth Moon Model, extraterrestrial intelligence. You need to be represented in the newsletter: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1eUDDiBpks6wN0IWB5iu0gAHAVbL-4Qlr?usp=sharing

Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence

https://www.seti.org/

The Golden Record

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aR6oV8kJKf4

https://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/golden-record/

https://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/golden-record/whats-on-the-record/music/

https://www.space.com/42686-voyager-2-in-interstellar-space-whats-next.html

Music:

Chris Hadfield (astronaut) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Hadfield

Major Tom by Peter Schilling https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Schilling

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KaOC9danxNo

Kim Boekbinder https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kim_Boekbinder

The Sky Is Calling  https://kimboekbinder.bandcamp.com/album/the-sky-is-calling-2

The Drake Equation https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake_equation

Frank Drake first contact: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmfC51FstIg

Listen to Boekbinder’s Stellar Alchemy and relate to the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (Stellar Evolution)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hertzsprung%E2%80%93Russell_diagram

Carl Sagan

https://www.space.com/15994-carl-sagan.html

Cosmos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gfCc7ZJjHiM&list=PLKSi40WEKtMxykDBP8_vrC6bKXotys8KJ

Contact—audio book

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eMudkxogI8E

Contact explained

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yqtmkqzmlBo

https://io9.gizmodo.com/5931333/read-carl-sagans-letter-politely-telling-warner-bros-their-script-sucked

First contact movies

https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2016/12/is-arrival-the-best-first-contact-film-ever-made/510782/

Neil deGrasse Tyson

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmos:_A_Spacetime_Odyssey

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TgA2y-Bgi3c

 

 

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13 December Science 7–Energy transfer and transformation systems, devices, sculptures; parent newsletter material

Mindful Moment

Review past DSN entry

Preview Blog Post

Prepare DSN entry

Copy and paste the url for today’s post into your DSN entry

Write anticipatory statements for each of the 7 items for an entry

Questions

(Read your anticipatory sentences)

  • * * * *

Do this first:

Pick out sketches, photos, excerpts from written DSN entries that you have related to the comeback can, the rocket, the swing experiment, the energy demonstrations, the Rube Goldberg energy transformation project. Make sure your name and period are attached to each item. Sketches and photos need captions/explanations. Send to:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1cL7Q3edI1gmsbIAXnN50yIqUi8LhAWpC?usp=sharing

  • * * * *

Next:

Work on your system, device, sculpture.

Present and explain next class.

Take a look at these links:

https://www.exploratorium.edu/tinkering/blog/2015/08/27/homemade-switches

https://www.exploratorium.edu/tinkering/blog/2015/08/31/facilitating-switches

https://www.exploratorium.edu/tinkering/blog/2015/06/12/audio-storytelling-what-makes-a-switch-

https://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-don-t-perpetual-motion-machines-ever-work-netta-schramm

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