17 January Science 7 The Diversity of Life–Partner Trees–Independent Project

Happy New Year!!! I hope you all had the very best break ever. Let’s begin a most exciting semester of science 7.

  • Resolution to keep digital science notebook complete and up-to-date.
  • Science souvenirs (pictures, poems, tales, etc.) from your break that have connections to science from your point of view.
  • One of Dr. F’s science souvenirs:

See the holiday device. Explain how it works.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The following passage is the last paragraph from Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species. The words represent a magnificent accomplishment in science and contain the basic ideas we will explore during 2nd semester of Science 7.

In groups of 4 analyze the passage. Note your questions. Select examples. Share your group’s thinking with the full class. Summarize your ideas, your group’s ideas, and the ideas of the class in a blog post–categorized as Science 7.

  1. It is interesting to contemplate a tangled bank, clothed with many plants of many kinds, with birds singing on the bushes, with various insects flitting about, and with worms crawling through the damp earth, and to reflect that these elaborately constructed forms, so different from each other, and dependent upon each other in so complex a manner, have all been produced by laws acting around us.
  2. These laws, taken in the largest sense, being Growth with reproduction; Inheritance which is almost implied by reproduction; Variability from the indirect and direct action of the conditions of life, and from use and disuse; a Ratio of Increase so high as to lead to a Struggle for Life, and as a consequence to Natural Selection, entailing Divergence of Character and the Extinction of less improved forms.
  3. Thus, from the war of nature, from famine and death, the most exalted object which we are capable of conceiving, namely, the production of the higher animals, directly follows.
  4. There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed by the Creator into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone circling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being evolved.

+ + + + + + + +  + + +

Visit your partner tree. Organize your observations from the first to today’s. See the diagrams below showing what to look for when observing trees. Use these guidelines to enhance your observations.

https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/1wYRIYo1x-6qI82SjYgI4maet-ilg8kV4AfqheIQH09w/edit?usp=sharing

Add important information about your tree species to your records through research from books and reliable websites.

See the two spreadsheets on campus trees completed by science 7 classes in 2015-2016.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Project

 

 

 

 

 

+ + + + + + + + + +

Inquire, build, create, invent, do, serve. (Independent projects)

Some examples–there are so many possibilities:

Sustained creative writing in science by two middle schoolers

  •             Motion is when an object is moving. It doesn’t necessarily have to be going somewhere. When an object in motion hits another object it results in impact. The size of impact depends on the size of the objects colliding. Without motion, the universe wouldn’t be here. Nothing could ever happen without motion.
  •             To measure the motion of an object, I think you need the distance of travel, time of travel, velocity, force/momentum, and a relative point. You need a relative point because if an object is just moving through space, there is no point for it to move closer or farther from. If an object is just moving through nothing (open space), where it ends up later will be exactly where it ends up later will be exactly like where it started. So basically it hasn’t moved at all.
  •             Einstein’s theory of relativity has much to do with motion. Can time stand still if you move away from a clock/time at the speed of light? The way this works is the time travels from the clock to your eyes at the speed of light. So if you move away from the light which carries the time to you…wouldn’t time stand still? If this true, would it be possible to go back in time if you travel faster than the speed of light? The only way to find out is to try it and experiment. I doubt these experiments with time travel will occur very soon. Humans are far from travel even close to the speed of light.
  •             A centerfielder judging a fly ball is my specialty. My favorite sport is baseball and I know pretty well how players judge the ball. Seventy-five percent of judging is seeing the acceleration of the ball off the bat and determining if it is low or high ball. A hard, low ball would reach it’s highest point in about one second. It is quite amazing how fast the ball can accelerate into the air. I think in races, acceleration is a key part to winning. It’s a key part in motion!

A Tennis Ball in Space vs. A Tennis Ball on Earth

I wrote this for our unit on motion and how gravity affects our everyday life. (Note: The first line is a tennis ball in space, the second line is a tennis ball on Earth, the third line is a tennis ball in space, the fourth line is a tennis ball on Earth, etc.)

  • Gliding to be free to drift wherever you please,
  • Gliding in a designated path.
  • Tracing your thoughts,
  • Tracing the thoughts of the arm that directed you.
  • Knowing you will always drift and will never end,
  • Knowing you will eventually hit the ground with a thud ending all movement.
  • With the whole universe to explore,
  • With the whole planet to explore but not by your choices.
  • Sensing the danger of a black hole,
  • Sensing the danger of a playful puppy.
  • Loneliness of being the only tennis ball in space,
  • Loneliness of being the only thing flying.
  • Being able to not feel anything for there is nothing near you,
  • Being able to feel people’s hands and anything that touches you.
  • Many other items that feels as strange as you,
  • Many other tennis balls.
  • Random and spontaneous.
  • Precise and assured.
  • Free.

Inquire, Build, Create, Invent, Do, Serve

Project Based Learning is a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to an authentic, engaging and complex question, problem, or challenge. Essential Project Design Elements include:

  • Key Knowledge, Understanding, and Success Skills – The project is focused on student learning goals, including standards-based content and skills such as critical thinking/problem solving, collaboration, and self-management.
  • Challenging Problem or Question– The project is framed by a meaningful problem to solve or a question to answer, at the appropriate level of challenge.
  • Sustained Inquiry– Students engage in a rigorous, extended process of asking questions, finding resources, and applying information.
  • Authenticity– The project features real-world context, tasks and tools, quality standards, or impact – or speaks to students’ personal concerns, interests, and issues in their lives.
  • Student Voice & Choice– Students make some decisions about the project, including how they work and what they create.
  • Reflection– Students and teachers reflect on learning, the effectiveness of their inquiry and project activities, the quality of student work, obstacles and how to overcome them.
  • Critique & Revision– Students give, receive, and use feedback to improve their process and products.
  • Public Product Students make their project work public by explaining, displaying and/or presenting it to people beyond the classroom.

Criteria / Parameters for Independent Project in Science 7

 Inquire, Build, Create, Invent, Do, Serve

A proposal is made, project is executed, and product is “published.”

The proposal identifies:

  • Key Knowledge, Understanding, and Success Skills 
  • Challenging Problem or Question
  • Sources of personal interest and motivation
  • Clear connections to scientific concepts, ideas, practices

The project involves:

  • Significant, original, first-hand experience. (original/first-hand research, construction, creative efforts, action, service) (The firsthand experiential aspect is essential. Primarily conducting second-hand research does not address the criteria for this project.)
  • Sustained Inquiry (timeline proposed and followed)
  • A Level of commitment that is enacted
  • Communication with parents on the student’s level of commitment and level of engagement and effort
  • Support of parents

The project is:

  • Authentic
  • Based on Student’s Voice & Choice

The project includes:

  • Genuine, Deep, Insightful, Coherent Reflection

Students engage in:

  • Critique & Revision
  • On-going communication with teacher, peers, parents on the progress of the project

The project results in

  • A Public Product to be determined through the proposal and project processes

 7 classes (Day 6) will be devoted to this project (23 January through 13 April). Publication / Presentation will take place after 13 April. Details will be established by students and class. Class time will be devoted to work on the project. This time will include consulation and feedback. A student may opt to use 100% of the alotted time for his/her independent work. He/she may also opt to use 50% of the time. Students may also opt out of completing an independent project. Students will select the amount of the alotted in class time they want to devote to their projects in their initial proposals. These choices will remain in effect for the entire project.

All students are expected to keep up with the work from the specified curriculum. This includes maintaining a complete and up-to-date digital science notebook. Students who opt for 50% or 0% of allotted class time for independent work may use the time to keep their regular assignments complete and up-to-date. It is possible that changes may be made to this plan depending on circumstances. The independent project is included as part of the evaluation of learning habits.



 

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16 January 2017 Science 8: Happy New Year!

Happy New Year!!! I hope you all had the very best break ever. Let’s begin a most exciting semester of science 8.

  • Resolution to keep digital science notebook complete and up-to-date.
  • Science souvenirs (pictures, poems, tales, etc.) from your break that have connections to science from your point of view.
  • One of Dr. F’s science souvenirs:

 

 

 

 

 

5 January 2017 Seattle at local noon

  • Read the Guardian article and write a response on your blog. Be sure to categorize with Science 8.
  • http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/jan/07/human-impact-has-pushed-earth-into-the-anthropocene-scientists-say
  • Start a word list for the semester with at least 10 words you do not know. What do you think the word means just from the context in the article. Look up the words. How do your inferred meanings compare? Be careful to discern which connotation of the word is appropriate to the context.
  • Be prepared to share what you have written.
  • What do you think it means?
  • What parts make sense to you?
  • What concerns you?
  • What is confusing?
  • What questions do you have?
  • What things can people do?
  • What things should people do?
  • In what ways does the article touch on things that relate to our topics for semester 2?
  • Semester 2:
  • Matter and Energy in Organisms and Ecosystems
  • Earth’s Systems
  • Human Impacts on the Environment
  • Keep a list of words that you think are important but which you do not know.

Inquire, build, create, invent, do, serve. (Independent projects)

Some examples–there are so many possibilities:

Sustained creative writing in science by two middle schoolers

  •             Motion is when an object is moving. It doesn’t necessarily have to be going somewhere. When an object in motion hits another object it results in impact. The size of impact depends on the size of the objects colliding. Without motion, the universe wouldn’t be here. Nothing could ever happen without motion.
  •             To measure the motion of an object, I think you need the distance of travel, time of travel, velocity, force/momentum, and a relative point. You need a relative point because if an object is just moving through space, there is no point for it to move closer or farther from. If an object is just moving through nothing (open space), where it ends up later will be exactly where it ends up later will be exactly like where it started. So basically it hasn’t moved at all.
  •             Einstein’s theory of relativity has much to do with motion. Can time stand still if you move away from a clock/time at the speed of light? The way this works is the time travels from the clock to your eyes at the speed of light. So if you move away from the light which carries the time to you…wouldn’t time stand still? If this true, would it be possible to go back in time if you travel faster than the speed of light? The only way to find out is to try it and experiment. I doubt these experiments with time travel will occur very soon. Humans are far from travel even close to the speed of light.
  •             A centerfielder judging a fly ball is my specialty. My favorite sport is baseball and I know pretty well how players judge the ball. Seventy-five percent of judging is seeing the acceleration of the ball off the bat and determining if it is low or high ball. A hard, low ball would reach it’s highest point in about one second. It is quite amazing how fast the ball can accelerate into the air. I think in races, acceleration is a key part to winning. It’s a key part in motion!

A Tennis Ball in Space vs. A Tennis Ball on Earth

I wrote this for our unit on motion and how gravity affects our everyday life. (Note: The first line is a tennis ball in space, the second line is a tennis ball on Earth, the third line is a tennis ball in space, the fourth line is a tennis ball on Earth, etc.)

  • Gliding to be free to drift wherever you please,
  • Gliding in a designated path.
  • Tracing your thoughts,
  • Tracing the thoughts of the arm that directed you.
  • Knowing you will always drift and will never end,
  • Knowing you will eventually hit the ground with a thud ending all movement.
  • With the whole universe to explore,
  • With the whole planet to explore but not by your choices.
  • Sensing the danger of a black hole,
  • Sensing the danger of a playful puppy.
  • Loneliness of being the only tennis ball in space,
  • Loneliness of being the only thing flying.
  • Being able to not feel anything for there is nothing near you,
  • Being able to feel people’s hands and anything that touches you.
  • Many other items that feels as strange as you,
  • Many other tennis balls.
  • Random and spontaneous.
  • Precise and assured.
  • Free.

Inquire, Build, Create, Invent, Do, Serve

Project Based Learning is a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to an authentic, engaging and complex question, problem, or challenge. Essential Project Design Elements include:

  • Key Knowledge, Understanding, and Success Skills – The project is focused on student learning goals, including standards-based content and skills such as critical thinking/problem solving, collaboration, and self-management.
  • Challenging Problem or Question– The project is framed by a meaningful problem to solve or a question to answer, at the appropriate level of challenge.
  • Sustained Inquiry– Students engage in a rigorous, extended process of asking questions, finding resources, and applying information.
  • Authenticity– The project features real-world context, tasks and tools, quality standards, or impact – or speaks to students’ personal concerns, interests, and issues in their lives.
  • Student Voice & Choice– Students make some decisions about the project, including how they work and what they create.
  • Reflection– Students and teachers reflect on learning, the effectiveness of their inquiry and project activities, the quality of student work, obstacles and how to overcome them.
  • Critique & Revision– Students give, receive, and use feedback to improve their process and products.
  • Public Product Students make their project work public by explaining, displaying and/or presenting it to people beyond the classroom.

Criteria / Parameters for Independent Project in Science 8

 Inquire, Build, Create, Invent, Do, Serve

A proposal is made, project is executed, and product is “published.”

The proposal identifies:

  • Key Knowledge, Understanding, and Success Skills 
  • Challenging Problem or Question
  • Sources of personal interest and motivation
  • Clear connections to scientific concepts, ideas, practices

The project involves:

  • Significant, original, first-hand experience. (original/first-hand research, construction, creative efforts, action, service) (The firsthand experiential aspect is essential. Primarily conducting second-hand research does not address the criteria for this project.)
  • Sustained Inquiry (timeline proposed and followed)
  • A Level of commitment that is enacted
  • Communication with parents on the student’s level of commitment and level of engagement and effort
  • Support of parents

The project is:

  • Authentic
  • Based on Student’s Voice & Choice

The project includes:

  • Genuine, Deep, Insightful, Coherent Reflection

Students engage in:

  • Critique & Revision
  • On-going communication with teacher, peers, parents on the progress of the project

The project results in

  • A Public Product to be determined through the proposal and project processes

 7 classes (Day 1) will be devoted to this project (27 January through 18 April). Publication / Presentation will take place after 18 April. Details will be established by students and class. Class time will be devoted to work on the project. This time will include consulation and feedback. A student may opt to use 100% of the alotted time for his/her independent work. He/she may also opt to use 50% of the time. Students may also opt out of completing an independent project. Students will select the amount of the alotted in class time they want to devote to their projects in their initial proposals. These choices will remain in effect for the entire project.

All students are expected to keep up with the work from the specified curriculum. This includes maintaining a complete and up-to-date digital science notebook. Students who opt for 50% or 0% of allotted class time for independent work may use the time to keep their regular assignments complete and up-to-date. It is possible that changes may be made to this plan depending on circumstances. The independent project is included as part of the evaluation of learning habits.

  • Pick out a partner tree. (Ipad, map, picture, description–we will add to your knowledge of your tree as the semester progresses.)
  • How do you think your plant grew? Where did the material come from?
  • Some of the big questions this semester: Where does material come from? Where does it go? How does it move? What happens along the way?

Next class:

Setting more expectations for spring 2016.

Lessons from Thin Air.

What does it mean to understand something? What does it mean to learn something?

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December 21 Science 7 Relating Electricity and Magnetism–other ways to generate electricity

Electricity and magnetism–how are they related?

What happens to the needle of a compass when place near a wire that is carrying an electric current? See the pictures below. Notice the orientations of the battery and the compass. What will happen if these orientations are changed?

What happens if a magnet is moved relative to a wire (a conductor)? The galvanometer is like the compass in the preceding pictures; it can be used to detect an electric current. What are the consequences of this relationship: A current in a wire produced a magnetic field. A magnet that moves near a conducting wire generates an electric current in the wire?

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19 December Science 7 Electricity–a “snack”

Some background:

Static electricity (static–not moving)

Charge (having the property of behaving “electrically”)(do not confuse electric charge with magnetic pole–electricity and magnetism are related but not the same)

Positive and Negative (an interesting story of a theory we no longer believe–invented by the American scientist, diplomat, patriot–Benjamin Franklin)

Defined from history: When a glass rod is rubbed with silk, the glass becomes positively charged.

Defined from history: When a rubber rod is rubbed with wool, the rubber becomes negatively charged.

What would you have to see to conclude there is a third kind of electric charge?

Try the following simulations:

https://phet.colorado.edu/sims/html/balloons-and-static-electricity/latest/balloons-and-static-electricity_en.html

http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Physics-Interactives/Static-Electricity

Historical theories:
https://www.princeton.edu/ssp/joseph-henry-project/galvanometer/explaining-the-phenomenon/ 

*****

Batteries and bulbs

Can you get a bulb to light with only one battery, one bulb, and one wire.

Sketch what you plan to try first.

Try out your sketches.

Record the results.

How many different ways can you arrange the materials?

What “rules” seem to determine which arrangements work and which do not?

What model can you think of to explain electric current?

What is the relationship between static electrical phenomena and current electrical phenomena?

*****

Build the following circuits. First, use identical bulbs. Describe the two circuits. Explain how they are the same and how they are different. Record your observations in your notes. Next, use two different kinds of bulbs. Record your observations in your notes.

In both cases exactly the same material is used. How can you explain the results?Develop a visual model (you may use words and numerals). Make your visual attractive and neat. What ideas can you suggest about what an electric current is/does?

Analogies and Models are important in science. They are used as bridges between the familiar to the new. However, analogies and models can lead to confusion if used unreflectively. Pay attention to the cautions discussed in class. ALWAYS analyze where analogy/model works or fits and where it fails, does not fit, does not work. Trace out the connections between the model/analogy and the target phenomenon or system. Not everything will connect clearly. The non-connections and the “sort of” connections are the points where the analogy / model fails.

Make a list of the terms used by people to discuss electricity, electrical phenomena, and electrical systems. Analyze the meanings of these words and how the meanings might be different in different contexts. Of course, you want to learn the meaning of the words in the scientist’s context.

Here are some links to 2 common analogies for simple circuits (direct current).

Siphon current

Traffic current

Some references if you are interested. They are much more detailed.

http://www.education.leeds.ac.uk/assets/files/research/cssme/ns-tu/explaining_how_electric_circuits_work.pdf

http://www.gilaresources.info/pdfs/Appendix%20A.pdf

http://www.nuffieldfoundation.org/practical-physics/models-electric-circuits

http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/circuits/u9l4b.cfm

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16 December Science 8 Modeling the Moon and Letter from Earth

Modeling the moon.

16dec16at7am

16 December 2016 at 7:00 am New Delhi (Vasant Vihar) looking west

Letter from Earth

Imagine that you have the opportunity to communicate with an extraterrestrial intelligence (whose intentions toward humans are benign and may, in fact, be helpful). What would you tell them about the earth? Why?

First write a “Letter from Earth” in English.

Then, explain why you chose the points you did. How would you make your letter understandable? Would you include pictures? Of what? Why? Would you include music? Which music? Would you include works of art? Scientific ideas? Mathematical ideas? Descriptions of places or habitats? Politics–current-historical-ancient? Movies? Books? Poems? Artifacts from various cultures? Religious ideas? Examples of biodiversity? ect.

The novel Contact: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8WTupkOBpH8

The film Contact: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5gm6_NId6LM

Bad Astronomy website reviews  Movies:  http://www.badastronomy.com/bad/movies/index.html

15 movies about alien contact: http://www.tasteofcinema.com/2015/the-15-best-movies-about-alien-contact/2/

Review of new movie Arrival: http://www.astronomy.com/news/2016/11/arrival-film-review

Find out about Carl Sagan, astronomer who wrote a novel Contact which was made into a film,  and author of popular science series Cosmoshttp://www.carlsagan.com/

Many additional references:

http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2015/12/11/11-dec-and-beyond-moon-earth-sun-model-and-contact/

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15 December Science 7 Assessment review–3 air experiments–magnets

Review of assessment.

  • Measuring the density of air.
  • Heating air–three demonstrations.
  • Phase changes–differential pressure.

Magnets and magnetism:

  1. See the following pictures–and follow the instructions:

photo 1 (3)

Bar magnets should not touch. They should not be dropped or heated. They should be stored in pairs with opposite poles adjacent to each other with a non-magnetic spacer and “keepers.”

photo 2 (3)photo 3 (3)

Set up a bar magnet as pictured above. Let it come to rest. What do you notice? How do you think this might work? Magnetism is an example of a force that “acts at a distance.” What could that mean?

magnetcompasses

What do you notice about the position of the compass needles? This is one way to map the magnetic field around the bar magnet. You and your partner should try this. Record the results. How might this effect be explained? (NOTE: Do not let the compass and magnet touch.)

magnettray

Examine the pictures above and below. A magnet is placed UNDER the plastic tray. A sheet of paper is placed in the tray so that the iron filings will be easier to see. Try this. Lightly sprinkle iron filings in the tray. Gently tap the tray without moving it with respect to the magnet. Observe the patterns. This is another way to map the magnetic field around a magnet. What ideas come to mind when mapping the magnetic fields? How could magnets work? How do they “act at a distance?” Carefully gather and pour the filing back into the container for the next round. Try different arrangements for the magnets–remember not to let them touch. (NOTE: Do not let the filings come into contact with the magnet.)

onemagnet

What does this patterns suggest about the “shape” and “structure” of the magnetic field around the bar magnet?

2magnets

What do you see? How do you think the magnets are arranged? Why?

cropped-2magnets1.jpg

What do you see? How do you think the magnets are arranged? Why?

If there is time, try this experiment: http://sciencenetlinks.com/student-teacher-sheets/how-strong-your-magnet/

What do you learn? What would a graph look like with number of paper clips on the vertical axis and layers of tape on the horizontal axis? Try it.

photo (1)

Which force is stronger–magnetism or gravity? Is this a legitimate question? Why or why not?

What other questions do you have about magnets and magnetism?

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14 December 2016 Science 8 Astronomy continued

  1. Go over assessment
  • Get calendar and count days from fall equinox to spring. And from spring equinox to fall.
  • Explain difference.
  • Draw ellipse.
  • Kepler’s Laws (from Wikipedia):
  • The orbit of a planet is an ellipse with the Sun at one of the two foci.
  • A line segment joining a planet and the Sun sweeps out equal areas during equal intervals of time.
  • The square of the orbital period of a planet is proportional to the cube of the semi-major axis of its orbit.

2. View and discuss videos of scale model of solar system

3. Begin Moon model

Using your observations and other references, construct a room-sized “working” model of the Earth-Moon-Sun system. Make a plan that includes a master sketch and details of the operation of the model :

  • Daily motion of the earth. (What causes day and night?)
  • Apparent daily motion of the moon. (Why does the moon appear to rise in the east, move across the sky, and set in the west?)
  • “Monthly” motion of the moon. (How does the moon orbit the earth–direction, timing, rotation?)
  • Phases of the moon and their relation to rising and setting times of the moon. (When does each phase rise and set, cross the meridian, with respect to the solar day on earth?)
  • The phases when both solar and lunar eclipses occur. (Why-and when-do eclipses occur? Why are the sizes and distances between the earth and moon significant factors in what happens during eclipses?)
  • Explanation for why eclipses do not occur with every lunar cycle.
  • Earth’s yearly motion is not modeled.
  • Model of sun only projects light in a band. Light from real sun goes in all directions.
  • Floor represents plane of earth’s orbit with sun. Seasonal phenomenal is not modeled.

Moon pictures 21,22,23,24,25,26 November. Just before or just after sunrise.

moondawn21novmoon22novmoon23nov

moon24novmoon25novmoon25nov

 

 

 

The following picture shows the moon on the 26th of November. You can see the brightened eastern sky just before sunrise. Note the position and orientation of the moon.

moon26novsunrise*Explain why you think the moon appears as it does. Consult your own moon observations. Describe the daily and “monthly” motion of the moon. Draw two diagrams of the moon and the sun. In one view show the moon’s phases and the moon’s and sun’s positions from your point of view. In another, show the moon’s phases and the moon’s and sun’s positions from outside the sun-earth-moon system, a “god’s eye” view.

10dec201610 December, 2016. What time do you think this moon rose?

13dec2016

Last night’s (13 December) full moon. What time do you think it rose? What does the rising and setting time have to do with the phase? How is the moon positioned in the sky with respect to the sun?

Look at the following pictures. See the rising sun. See the student pointing to the sun and the moon at the same time. See the angle his arms make. See the phase of the moon.

photo 4 photo 3 (2) photo 2 (6) photo 1 (6)

 

http://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~pogge/Ast161/Unit2/phases.html#lunation

http://earthsky.org/moon-phases

Can you follow the logic and the procedure to determine the height of mountains on the moon?

mountains-of-moon

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13 December Science 7 Written assessment energy/hot air balloon

Complete written assessment. Follow directions in class.

When you finish.

  1. Have a good visit with your partner tree. Picture. Observations. Changes since the last time. Prediction of what you will see in January. Record all in your partner tree sub-folder in the GDR (Growth, Development, Reproduction) folder.
  2. Bring DSN up to date.
  3. View links, videos on energy from previous blogposts.
  4. Write down the ideas you have about magnets and magnetism, electricity (static and current), electro-magnetism–the relationship between magnetism and electricity, how energy relates to electricity, magnetism, electro-magnetism.
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12 December Science 8 Written assessment astronomy

Put your name and period on each sheet of paper you use. Follow the instructions.

When you are finished:

Review the moon rising and setting times and phases for the past month: https://www.timeanddate.com/astronomy/india/new-delhi

https://www.timeanddate.com/moon/india/new-delhi

Investigate the SETI website: http://www.seti.org/

Find out about the Golden Record: http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/spacecraft/goldenrec.html

Watch any of the astronomy / history of astronomy videos linked in previous blogs.

 

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8 December Science 8 Finish solar system model and presentation; prepare for written assessment

Finish / polish solar system model and presentation (not only what we know but also how we know)

  • Scaled sizes and distances (how do we know? what techniques have been used to establish distances? Check out Aristarchus: http://astrosun2.astro.cornell.edu/academics/courses/astro201/aristarchus.htm  and Brahe/Kepler: http://galileoandeinstein.physics.virginia.edu/lectures/tycho.htm)
  • Direction of orbits (how do we know?)
  • Direction of spin (how do we know?)
  • Angle of axis of rotation to plane of orbit (orbital plane) (how do we know?)
  • Facts about 8 planets and Pluto (when discovered? how discovered–so small and so far away? what did people notice and what did people look for? how are things like density, atmosphere composition, presence of water, etc. predicted/determined?)
  • Earth’s moon (see questions on phases, times of rising and setting, distance, size, rotation)
  • One moon of Jupiter (see questions on phases, times of rising and setting, distance, size, rotation; who first saw the moons of Jupiter-How?; how are the moons of Jupiter important in navigation?–see video episode on Mapping: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRY2SkMTafc)
  • Think about travel in the solar system. What was your speed if you traveled in your real time in the scaled distance? How does this speed compare to the speed of light?
  • How would you have to travel in your scale to have a realistic speed and time? See:
  • http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/
  • http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/news/factsheet.html

Prepare for written assessment

Answer questions; follow, examine, study links; ask questions from previous blog posts:

Be sure to watch and discuss in writing in your dsn–what is your private universe?:

 

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