19 April Science 8 Human Impact Project research, planning, preparation

Complete your activity and discussion plan by the end of class on Thursday. It should be uploaded in your DSN.

Describe how you will introduce your topic and how you hope to sequence the discussion and activity. Work out a schedule/timeframe. What questions will you use to prompt? What responses do you expect? How will you respond and follow up? How will you encourage discussion between students? How will you restate, summarize, move to the next point?

You need a materials list for your activity. In that list, indicate what materials you need from our science supply. If we have it (and it is safe), you may use it. If we do not have it, you will need to consider alternatives.

Create a BRIEF google slide presentation to help you with the structure of your discussion/activity.

What you should have started:

  1. A document in your DSN with the annotated bibliography on your topic.
  2. A document in your DSN where you are outlining, writing your ideas, questions, and reflections about your topic. How is
  3. A document where you plan your discussion. (Consultation with Dr.F)
  4. BRIEF slide presentation with main points, questions, etc. to help you lead the discussion.
  5. A document with the plan for the activity you will lead. (Consultation with Dr. F) This plan will include how the activity is connected to your topic and discussion. The projected time frame and details of procedure. Materials and plan for distributing. Expected outcomes.
  1. Conduct research, annotate sources, and compile an annotated bibliography: Well-respected, credible, reliable, valid, accurate websites, journals, in the news (BBC, NYT, NPR, TOI—other sources with approval), books, videos; Interviews and firsthand observations. Dr. F will post resources and links to resources. Be on the lookout!

You should look at 3-4 sources each day provided for research. The bibliography is arranged in alphabetical order by author’s last name. Include a minimum of 9 sources–reliable scientists, reliable information, reasoned (backed up with evidence) arguments, critiques, and policy recommendations. No references without author attribution (no Wikipedia, for example). Be very, very careful with blogposts and opinion sites. Be able to justify the sources you include.

Annotation format:

  • Bibliographic information in MLA or APA citation style. Complete and consistent.
  • Description of resource (context, type, etc.);
  • Summary of main ideas and important details;
  • Assessment of quality, validity, reliability, point of view, etc.;
  • Your reaction–what it makes you think of, what questions you have, how you feel about the implications of the ideas, facts, argument.
  1. Lead a class activity that is preferably interactive, hands-on/experiential, inquiry-oriented, thought-provoking. The activity should be clearly linked to the topic. Because the time is short you should focus on some aspect of the topic rather than try to encompass the entire topic.
  2. Create Presentation and lead a discussion that is directed toward understanding the science and the issues—Brainstorming Solutions—Present existing proposals for solutions. Class members should do most of the talking. The discussion leader asks questions, clarifies, keeps the discussion on track. This may be a new experience.
  3. You need to prepare for 25 minutes for both #2 and #3 above. Discuss with Dr. F how you might organize your 25 minutes.

Reporting standards:

  • SEP
  • Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
  • Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information
  • CCC
  • Systems and System Models
  • DCI
  • Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience
  • Human Impacts on Earth Systems

Tentative schedule:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/19pC9XXhM1UdcTXYIK-L8mVLhhweSaxLFMAXmwQCP3uY/edit?usp=sharing

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18 April Science 7 Preparing for observation of Rhesus macaques and park dogs

Ethology, Ecology, Evolution of Monkeys and Dogs at the park

On Friday we will take a field trip during class to a park near the school. The park is carved out of the Central Ridge Forest.  (See this old pamphlet: https://archive.org/details/DelhiRidge)

Please use the time today to prepare for the field trip.

  1. Increase your knowledge of dog and monkey behavior.
  2. Practice observation of behaviors with the various video clips. Develop “search images” through careful observation. The value of video is that you can “rewind and replay.”
  3. Consider how an organism’s behavior enables it to live and reproduce in an environment–the environment for both of our animals of study include physical, biological, and social aspects.
  4. Think about how an organism’s behavior, body, and environment (at all scales) interact and how this interaction affects how successfully the organism reproduces and how successfully the offspring reproduce.

Review previous blogposts for information on primates and canids.

It is fun to look at scientific papers about things we study in Science 7. See this:  http://www.ipublishing.co.in/ijesarticles/thirteen/articles/volthree/EIJES31128.pdf

and this: https://www.nature.com/articles/srep32014

See if you can find other articles about monkeys and stray/street dogs in India.

See this list of Macaque behaviors: https://nc3rs.org.uk/macaques/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Ethogram-for-general-behavioural-monitoring-Caralyn-Kemp.pdf

See this list of Canid (dog family) behaviors: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/files/2017/04/pred_etho_canid1.pdf

Practice your observation skills with the following video clips. (You may use headphones for the videos.)

Monkeys: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ay-7LNMab40

Dogs: https://www.youtube.com/user/PatriciaMcConnell/videos

Watch during class and as homework before Friday’s trip:

 

 

 

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17 April Science 8 Human Impact Project

Today–please rate your learning habits with respect to the following 5 items.

Continue preparation.

Complete your activity and discussion plan by the end of class on Thursday. It should be uploaded in your DSN.

Describe how you will introduce your topic and how you hope to sequence the discussion and activity. Work out a schedule/timeframe. What questions will you use to prompt? What responses do you expect? How will you respond and follow up? How will you encourage discussion between students? How will you restate, summarize, move to the next point?

You need a materials list for your activity. In that list, indicate what materials you need from our science supply. If we have it (and it is safe), you may use it. If we do not have it, you will need to consider alternatives.

Create a BRIEF google slide presentation to help you with the structure of your discussion/activity.

What you should have started:

  1. A document in your DSN with the annotated bibliography on your topic.
  2. A document in your DSN where you are outlining, writing your ideas, questions, and reflections about your topic. How is
  3. A document where you plan your discussion. (Consultation with Dr.F)
  4. BRIEF slide presentation with main points, questions, etc. to help you lead the discussion.
  5. A document with the plan for the activity you will lead. (Consultation with Dr. F) This plan will include how the activity is connected to your topic and discussion. The projected time frame and details of procedure. Materials and plan for distributing. Expected outcomes.
  1. Conduct research, annotate sources, and compile an annotated bibliography: Well-respected, credible, reliable, valid, accurate websites, journals, in the news (BBC, NYT, NPR, TOI—other sources with approval), books, videos; Interviews and firsthand observations. Dr. F will post resources and links to resources. Be on the lookout!

You should look at 3-4 sources each day provided for research. The bibliography is arranged in alphabetical order by author’s last name. Include a minimum of 9 sources–reliable scientists, reliable information, reasoned (backed up with evidence) arguments, critiques, and policy recommendations. No references without author attribution (no Wikipedia, for example). Be very, very careful with blogposts and opinion sites. Be able to justify the sources you include.

Annotation format:

  • Bibliographic information in MLA or APA citation style. Complete and consistent.
  • Description of resource (context, type, etc.);
  • Summary of main ideas and important details;
  • Assessment of quality, validity, reliability, point of view, etc.;
  • Your reaction–what it makes you think of, what questions you have, how you feel about the implications of the ideas, facts, argument.
  1. Lead a class activity that is preferably interactive, hands-on/experiential, inquiry-oriented, thought-provoking. The activity should be clearly linked to the topic. Because the time is short you should focus on some aspect of the topic rather than try to encompass the entire topic.
  2. Create Presentation and lead a discussion that is directed toward understanding the science and the issues—Brainstorming Solutions—Present existing proposals for solutions. Class members should do most of the talking. The discussion leader asks questions, clarifies, keeps the discussion on track. This may be a new experience.
  3. You need to prepare for 25 minutes for both #2 and #3 above. Discuss with Dr. F how you might organize your 25 minutes.

Reporting standards:

  • SEP
  • Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
  • Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information
  • CCC
  • Systems and System Models
  • DCI
  • Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience
  • Human Impacts on Earth Systems

Tentative schedule:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/19pC9XXhM1UdcTXYIK-L8mVLhhweSaxLFMAXmwQCP3uY/edit?usp=sharing

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16 April Science 7 Finish posters/arguments for Teosinte, Anole, Pocket Mouse evolution; Primates

Finish posters/arguments for Teosinte, Anole, Pocket Mouse evolution; Primates

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yjr0R0jgct4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PMFuvP4nSrM

BBC Monkeys Revealed http://www.bbcearth.com/shows/monkeys-revealed/

https://www.facebook.com/bbcearth/videos/1375758662457686/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ND92YNQv0TU

https://www.ted.com/talks/laurie_santos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9ZjOsLrFS4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ASc-RFofxgM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xmBB57q2tYA

Interesting references for the next few meetings–please look at all the dog and primate references

Check this out: https://vimeo.com/132064789

Social intelligence: http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/06/ravens-remember-people-who-suckered-them-unfair-deal

https://evolution.berkeley.edu/evolibrary/news/171214_birdsbeaks

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/gallery/2017/dec/06/mapping-how-animals-interact-with-cities

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-42103058

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/05/humans-are-still-evolving-and-we-can-watch-it-happen

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/07/science/wolves-dogs-cooperation.html

https://www.nytimes.com/video/science/100000005162472/wolves-puppies-become-dogs.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/07/science/wolves-dogs-cooperation.html

Dog ethograms: CanineMSHS        pred_etho_canid1

Video practice: https://www.youtube.com/user/PatriciaMcConnell/videos

Dogs Decoded: http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/dogs-decoded/

A dog_s day with humans 2

The Origin of Human: http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/great-transitions-origin-humans

http://eol.org/pages/1228387/overview

http://eol.org/pages/327960/overview

http://itp.suzkirkpatrick.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Snow-Monkeys_Observation-Sheet1.pdf

http://nc3rs.org.uk/macaques/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Ethogram-for-general-behavioural-monitoring-Caralyn-Kemp.pdf

https://lbmp.anthro.ucla.edu/ethogram-behavioral-videos/

https://vimeo.com/45906210

Japanese macaques https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1eN43h0JNQY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n51bZRzNeoA

Macaques Thailand https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WezzTYtfMxc

Rhesus macaques http://natgeotv.com/in/monkey-thieves/videos/monkey-thieves

http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/macaque_mayhem

Gray langurs Jodhpur http://www.express.co.uk/news/nature/741837/planet-earth-2-monkey-rooftop-jumping-chase-video-best-ever-filmed-bbc

Designing an ethogram https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kWeXRL0JZvM

Animal behavior sampling https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ay-7LNMab40

Dogs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BITAJnpo88I

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17WBkCYjtFI&index=2&list=PLjNS6VD_LojNIb4ab4S9BKitmVymvpSf_

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngcxkiol0y0&index=9&list=PLjNS6VD_LojNIb4ab4S9BKitmVymvpSf_

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RtOoGbhIBps

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xSFMBEE9rU4

live wolves https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUCHs1TG3aM

 

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13 April Science 8 Research, Plan, Prepare, Practice

What you should have:

  1. A document in your DSN with the annotated bibliography on your topic.
  2. A document in your DSN where you are outlining, writing your ideas, questions, and reflections about your topic. How is
  3. A document where you plan your discussion. (Consultation with Dr.F)
  4. A BRIEF slide presentation with main points, questions, etc. to help you lead the discussion.
  5. A document with the plan for the activity you will lead. (Consultation with Dr. F) This plan will include how the activity is connected to your topic and discussion. The projected time frame and details of procedure. Materials and plan for distributing. Expected outcomes.
  1. Conduct research, annotate sources, and compile an annotated bibliography: Well-respected, credible, reliable, valid, accurate websites, journals, in the news (BBC, NYT, NPR, TOI—other sources with approval), books, videos; Interviews and firsthand observations. Dr. F will post resources and links to resources. Be on the lookout!

You should look at 3-4 sources each day provided for research. The bibliography is arranged in alphabetical order by author’s last name. Include a minimum of 9 sources–reliable scientists, reliable information, reasoned (backed up with evidence) arguments, critiques, and policy recommendations. No references without author attribution (no Wikipedia, for example). Be very, very careful with blogposts and opinion sites. Be able to justify the sources you include.

Annotation format:

  • Bibliographic information in MLA or APA citation style. Complete and consistent.
  • Description of resource (context, type, etc.);
  • Summary of main ideas and important details;
  • Assessment of quality, validity, reliability, point of view, etc.;
  • Your reaction–what it makes you think of, what questions you have, how you feel about the implications of the ideas, facts, argument.
  1. Lead a class activity that is preferably interactive, hands-on/experiential, inquiry-oriented, thought-provoking. The activity should be clearly linked to the topic. Because the time is short you should focus on some aspect of the topic rather than try to encompass the entire topic.
  2. Create Presentation and lead a discussion that is directed toward understanding the science and the issues—Brainstorming Solutions—Present existing proposals for solutions. Class members should do most of the talking. The discussion leader asks questions, clarifies, keeps the discussion on track. This may be a new experience.
  3. You need to prepare for 25 minutes for both #2 and #3 above. Discuss with Dr. F how you might organize your 25 minutes.

Reporting standards:

  • SEP
  • Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
  • Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information
  • CCC
  • Systems and System Models
  • DCI
  • Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience
  • Human Impacts on Earth Systems

Tentative schedule:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/19pC9XXhM1UdcTXYIK-L8mVLhhweSaxLFMAXmwQCP3uY/edit?usp=sharing

Research and Preparation–you need to practice all aspects of your activity

  1. Conduct research, annotate sources, and compile an annotated bibliography: Well-respected, credible, reliable, valid, accurate websites, journals, in the news (BBC, NYT, NPR, TOI—other sources with approval), books, videos; Interviews and firsthand observations. Dr. F will post resources and links to resources. Be on the lookout!

You should look at 3-4 sources each day provided for research. The bibliography is arranged in alphabetical order by author’s last name. Include a minimum of 9 sources–reliable scientists, reliable information, reasoned (backed up with evidence) arguments, critiques, and policy recommendations. No references without author attribution (no Wikipedia, for example). Be very, very careful with blogposts and opinion sites. Be able to justify the sources you include.

Annotation format:

  • Bibliographic information in MLA or APA citation style. Complete and consistent.
  • Description of resource (context, type, etc.);
  • Summary of main ideas and important details;
  • Assessment of quality, validity, reliability, point of view, etc.;
  • Your reaction–what it makes you think of, what questions you have, how you feel about the implications of the ideas, facts, argument.
  1. Lead a class activity that is preferably interactive, hands-on/experiential, inquiry-oriented, thought-provoking. The activity should be clearly linked to the topic. Because the time is short you should focus on some aspect of the topic rather than try to encompass the entire topic.
  2. Create Presentation and lead a discussion that is directed toward understanding the science and the issues—Brainstorming Solutions—Present existing proposals for solutions. Class members should do most of the talking. The discussion leader asks questions, clarifies, keeps the discussion on track. This may be a new experience.
  3. You need to prepare for 25 minutes for both #2 and #3 above. Discuss with Dr. F how you might organize your 25 minutes.

Reporting standards:

  • SEP
  • Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
  • Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information
  • CCC
  • Systems and System Models
  • DCI
  • Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience
  • Human Impacts on Earth Systems

Tentative schedule:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/19pC9XXhM1UdcTXYIK-L8mVLhhweSaxLFMAXmwQCP3uY/edit?usp=sharing

Research and Preparation–you need to practice all aspects of your activity

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12 April Science 7 Evolution continued

Turn in your permission slip for field trip 20 April. Meet at Gate 2. Bring water, hat, sunscreen, insect repellent, ipad/notebook.

mahavirpermissionApril2018

The Making of the Fittest–Pocket Mouse Film (with quiz)

http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/pocket-mouse-film-quiz

The Making of the Fittest

http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/making-fittest-natural-selection-and-adaptation

3 groups:

Teosinte

pd 3 JaeJun, Merrick, Max, YuBin, Sophie, Ananya

pd1 Tomas, Anton, Dowoo, Avanka, Yeon Woo

Anole

pd 3 JaeHa, Liam, Marvin, YuMin, Gabriella, Alanoud

pd1 Boris, Chihaya, HeeJun, Michal, Yaroslav

Pocket Mouse

pd 3David, Han Gyeol, Halen, JiWoo, Reyha, Suleimaan

pd1 Denzel, JaeHun, Bailey, Pauline

Create a poster/infographic telling the story of the claims, evidence, reasoning-argument.

Outline the basic question, the claim (the suspected answer/explanation), the various pieces of evidence, and the reasoning that links the evidence to the claim. You should use images and words. Make a draft of your poster / infographic first.

Interesting references for the next few meetings–please look at all the dog and primate references

Check this out: https://vimeo.com/132064789

Social intelligence: http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/06/ravens-remember-people-who-suckered-them-unfair-deal

https://evolution.berkeley.edu/evolibrary/news/171214_birdsbeaks

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/gallery/2017/dec/06/mapping-how-animals-interact-with-cities

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-42103058

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/05/humans-are-still-evolving-and-we-can-watch-it-happen

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/07/science/wolves-dogs-cooperation.html

https://www.nytimes.com/video/science/100000005162472/wolves-puppies-become-dogs.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/07/science/wolves-dogs-cooperation.html

Dog ethograms: CanineMSHS        pred_etho_canid1

Video practice: https://www.youtube.com/user/PatriciaMcConnell/videos

Dogs Decoded: http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/dogs-decoded/

A dog_s day with humans 2

The Origin of Human: http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/great-transitions-origin-humans

http://eol.org/pages/1228387/overview

http://eol.org/pages/327960/overview

http://itp.suzkirkpatrick.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Snow-Monkeys_Observation-Sheet1.pdf

http://nc3rs.org.uk/macaques/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Ethogram-for-general-behavioural-monitoring-Caralyn-Kemp.pdf

https://lbmp.anthro.ucla.edu/ethogram-behavioral-videos/

https://vimeo.com/45906210

Japanese macaques https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1eN43h0JNQY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n51bZRzNeoA

Macaques Thailand https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WezzTYtfMxc

Rhesus macaques http://natgeotv.com/in/monkey-thieves/videos/monkey-thieves

http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/macaque_mayhem

Gray langurs Jodhpur http://www.express.co.uk/news/nature/741837/planet-earth-2-monkey-rooftop-jumping-chase-video-best-ever-filmed-bbc

Designing an ethogram https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kWeXRL0JZvM

Animal behavior sampling https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ay-7LNMab40

Dogs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BITAJnpo88I

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17WBkCYjtFI&index=2&list=PLjNS6VD_LojNIb4ab4S9BKitmVymvpSf_

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngcxkiol0y0&index=9&list=PLjNS6VD_LojNIb4ab4S9BKitmVymvpSf_

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RtOoGbhIBps

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xSFMBEE9rU4

live wolves https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUCHs1TG3aM

 

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11 April Science 8 Research Human Impact Topic

Get 3 more annotations done today. Show your bibliography to Dr. F.

Write a paragraph summarizing your understanding of your topic. What are the main issues? What are the connections to earth cycles–that is, what earth cycles have been skewed because of human activity?

You may use headphones. Please do not distract other students. Today is a short period with early release. Make the most of the time. Ask for help if you need it.

What is this important India author saying in his recent book?

“In a substantially altered world, when sea-level rise has swallowed the Sundarbans and made cities like Kolkata, New York and Bangkok uninhabitable, when readers and museum goers turn to the art and literature of our time, will they not look first, and most urgently, for traces and portents of the altered world of their inheritance? And when they fail to find them, what should they—what can they—do other than to conclude that ours was a time when most forms of art and literature were drawn into the modes of concealment that prevented people from recognizing the realities of their plight? Quite possibly then, this era, which so congratulates itself on its self-awareness, will come to be known as the time of the Great Derangement.” In The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable by Amitav Ghosh

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10 April Science 7 Sprouting Seeds, Examples of Selection: Teocinte to Maize; Rock Pocket Mouse; Anole Lizards

Interest in field trip–field observations of mammals–monkeys and dogs in a local park?

Dinosaurs–

Examine the corn/maize kernels (seeds) you placed in the moist paper towel.

What happened? Descriptions, Sketches, Photos. Look at the seeds from others in the class.

Use the magiscope / microscope to examine the sprouts.

How do you imagine the growth to take place?

What is your idea of cells?

Three examples of selection (artificial and natural)

Popped Secret (Take the Quiz)

http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/popped-secret-film-quiz

http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/popped-secret-the-mysterious-origin-of-corn

The Making of the Fittest–Pocket Mouse Film (with quiz)

http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/pocket-mouse-film-quiz

The Making of the Fittest

http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/making-fittest-natural-selection-and-adaptation

The Origin of Species: Lizards in a Tree

http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/the-origin-of-species-lizards-in-an-evolutionary-tree

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9 April Science 8 The Human Impact Project (full time for the rest of the year)

Dead sea water (write your expectations:

Volunteer to find the density.

Observe changes when the temperature is lowered.

Examine the difference in refraction–can you tell which beaker holds the water from the Dead Sea?:

 

What will be left when water evaporates:

Will the Jordan River keep on flowing? https://e360.yale.edu/features/will_the_jordan_river_keep_on_flowing

The Dead Sea is Dying: Can a Controversial Plan Save It?https://e360.yale.edu/features/the_dead_sea_is_dying_can__a_controversial_plan_save_it

For today, you should have read:

What do you learn from these two articles?

What is the anthropocene?

How do you think your human impact topic relates to the ideas and information in the articles?

Add the ideas and information from this article to your thinking:

https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/03/ipbes-biodiversity-report-conservation-climate-change-spd

Now take a look at this interactive website.

Explain how the interactive works.

What do you add or change to your thinking?

What questions do you have?

  1. Conduct research, annotate sources, and compile an annotated bibliography: Well-respected, credible, reliable, valid, accurate websites, journals, in the news (BBC, NYT, NPR, TOI—other sources with approval), books, videos; Interviews and firsthand observations. Dr. F will post resources and links to resources. Be on the lookout!

You should look at 3-4 sources each day provided for research. The bibliography is arranged in alphabetical order by author’s last name. Include a minimum of 9 sources–reliable scientists, reliable information, reasoned (backed up with evidence) arguments, critiques, and policy recommendations. No references without author attribution (no Wikipedia, for example). Be very, very careful with blogposts and opinion sites. Be able to justify the sources you include.

Annotation format:

  • Bibliographic information in MLA or APA citation style. Complete and consistent.
  • Description of resource (context, type, etc.);
  • Summary of main ideas and important details;
  • Assessment of quality, validity, reliability, point of view, etc.;
  • Your reaction–what it makes you think of, what questions you have, how you feel about the implications of the ideas, facts, argument.
  1. Lead a class activity that is preferably interactive, hands-on/experiential, inquiry-oriented, thought-provoking. The activity should be clearly linked to the topic. Because the time is short you should focus on some aspect of the topic rather than try to encompass the entire topic.
  2. Create Presentation and lead a discussion that is directed toward understanding the science and the issues—Brainstorming Solutions—Present existing proposals for solutions. Class members should do most of the talking. The discussion leader asks questions, clarifies, keeps the discussion on track. This may be a new experience.
  3. You need to prepare for 25 minutes for both #2 and #3 above. Discuss with Dr. F how you might organize your 25 minutes.

Reporting standards:

  • SEP
  • Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
  • Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information
  • CCC
  • Systems and System Models
  • DCI
  • Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience
  • Human Impacts on Earth Systems

Tentative schedule:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/19pC9XXhM1UdcTXYIK-L8mVLhhweSaxLFMAXmwQCP3uY/edit?usp=sharing

Research and Preparation–you need to practice all aspects of your activity

9 April-27 April–this time is for research, for planning, for practicing and preparing.

Discussions and Activities (We will draw the order by lottery.) If you know that you will be absent on a particular day, and you draw that day, you will choose a new date. You may make one change with an agreeable classmate ONLY on the day of the main lottery. If someone is absent, the next person on the roster will take that slot. That means everyone needs to be ready on 2 May!!!) If you do not take your turn as discussion and activity leader, you must make arrangements with me in order to compensate for an incomplete project.

  • 2 May (2 DA’s)
  • 4 May (3 DA’s)
  • 8 May (3 DA’s)
  • 10 May (3 DA’s)
  • 14 May (3 DA’s)
  • 16 May (2 DA’s)
  • 18 May (3 DA’s)
  • 22 May (3 DA’s)

24 grades due

What points of information do you need to record when you consult each source? What criteria will you use to decide on the reliability, validity, credibility of a source? Why?

See this from Cornell on the annotated bibliography:

http://guides.library.cornell.edu/annotatedbibliography

Very useful source: http://e360.yale.edu/

http://e360.yale.edu/features/with-climate-change-deniers-in-charge-time-for-scientists-to-step-up-trenberth-trump

Raising Kids in Delhi’s Worsening Air . https://www.newyorker.com/culture/personal-history/raising-kids-in-delhis-worsening-air

Biodiversity is Life’s Safety Net https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/01/biodiversity-life-safety-net/550979/

The Problem with Being Young in India https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/podcasts/the-problem-with-being-young-in-india

East Kolkata Wetlands lock down over 60 percent carbon from sewage: Study https://india.mongabay.com/2018/04/06/east-kolkata-wetlands-lock-down-over-60-percent-carbon-from-sewage-study/

Topics

( < https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/1SXx0Zvtkx8C3SixY99dE-F5_GNS0XYM0yjkp3oNGqsg/edit?usp=sharing >)

  1. (Global) CO2–greenhouse effect–global warming–global climate change—shifting of carbon cycle
  2. India(Invasive species in India—loss of native habitat and biodiversity)
  3. (India) Endangered species. Habitat loss. Trade in endangered species. Animal human conflict. Conservation efforts in India.
  4. (Global)Elements in an Ipad-Laptop-Cell phone–Rare earths and conflict minerals—environmental costs of technology
  5. (India)Air quality in Delhi–air pollution
  6. (Global)The Anthropocene and the 6th great extinction
  7. (India)Mining-industrial, economic development, urban sprawl and conservation of nature / habitat / biodiversity in India
  8. (India)Agriculture-pesticides-fertilizer-nutrition and health in India
  9. (Global with local examples) The concept of ecosystem services—re-evaluating economic policy and theory in light of the environment—other ways to assess the value of the environment—international examples—Indian example.
  10. (India) The degradation and altering watersheds—River linking, dams.
  11. (India-Delhi) Access to clean water—sewage—pollution—irrigation—shortage of water.
  12. (Global) New Diseases. Zoonotic diseases. 
  13. (Global) Food security. Genetic engineering. Reduction in genetic diversity of food crops. Selection of herbicide resistant weeds. Loss of pollinator populations and diversity (pesticides and bees, for example).
  14. (Global and local) Deforestation–India, Tropics, Worldwide
  15. (Global and local) Climate denial, science denial, removal of environmental protections
  16. (Global and local) Current state of “green energy.” Renewable energy. Non-carbon based energy technologies
  17. (Global and local) Habitat restoration. “ Rewilding.”E.O. Wilson’s Half-Earth proposal.
  18. (Global and India) Promising environmentally sustainable practices and technologies (other than green energy examples from #16).
  19. (local)AES efforts to implement environmentally friendly practices. Areas for improvement. Suggestions.
  20. You choose—must be distinct from other options.
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6 April Science 7 Explaining Diversity through GDR and Natural Selection

We have finished 2 field studies in which you have had the opportunity to observe living things in the environment. One major emphasis in these studies has been the fact of biodiversity–that there are many kinds of living thing. We have related biodiversity to geography, the fact that there are patterns in the distribution of kinds of living thing in the world. We have also talked about the fact that more offspring are produced than survive. This fact sets the stage for differential survival (and consequently, reproduction) with respect to environmental conditions. The organisms that survive and reproduce pass their genetic characteristics to the next generation. In this manner, populations of organisms can change over time. One important question to consider is how variation arises. Sexual reproduction is one way that genetic material is mixed in offspring so that variation is  built into the process of reproduction. The various means by which genetic information is translated into the material bodies of organisms and even into patterns and potentials of behavior is important for a comprehensive and coherent explanation of how populations of organism change over time.

There are many places to become confused as we try to understand the grand scientific arguments of how the evolution of species takes place. The “dilemma of detail” is ever present in addressing questions of how genes work and how species evolve.

Be sure to ask and record your questions. Be sure to examine pre-existing ideas you might already have. Be sure to keep an open mind. It is possible you may need to revise, reject, develop more completely ideas you already have. Certainly you will encounter new ideas.

Let’s begin by writing down what you already know or think you know about seeds.

What questions do you have about seeds?

Examine the kernels of corn (popcorn / field corn / etc. depending on what we have). What do you notice?

Let’s prepare the corn for germination (what does that mean?) in a couple of ways. Record your procedure and your expectations. Wash your hands well after handling the soil.

Together we will view a segment of episode 3 Hidden World from Botany: A Blooming History. You should watch the entire episode on your own.

Segment on Nikolay Vavilov: https://vimeo.com/26072111

Entire episode of Hidden World (Sound is absent for a short part at the beginning, be patient. Use captions!): http://www.justgamingvideo.com/video/75b6DzNIU9A

Let’s discuss some of the ideas connected with the story of Vavilov and his work.

Next let’s sample some popcorn. What do you know about popcorn?

Popped Secret: The Mysterious Origin of Corn is a very important example in our quest to find out how scientists investigate and explain how species change. We will refer to it again and again. Be sure to ask questions.

https://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/popped-secret-the-mysterious-origin-of-corn

Be sure to have a complete and thoughtful DSN entry for today.

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