18 October Science 8 Getting ready for WOW–Water and Rivers

  1. Mindful moment. “We Wash Our Bowls” by Gary Snyder–

Water Watersheds Rafting Rivers Mountains Life

Water and Rivers

We Wash Our Bowls in this Water  by Gary Snyder

Click on the link below. Then click on poems. Then click on We Wash Our Bowls in this Water.

Gary Snyder

2. Check previous DSN. Make sure your data is entered on previous spreadsheets. Make sure you have reviewed and reflected on all experiments and all data. (Look at 1718 data, too)

We will have an interruption in our study of chemical reactions, so it is very important that you KEEP IN VIEW the ideas we have been discussing and exploring.

3. See today’s blogpost and plan.

4. Create DSN entry in a new folder called Earth Cycles. Put all your notes and writing from today in this folder.

5. Questions.

  • * * * * *

Write a reflective response to the poem. It is about Water (of course) and has references and vocabulary related to rafting intertwined. It also has references to Asia and Asian landscapes. What does the poet suggest about the relation of water to landscape? What are the different ways the poet alludes to the significance of water?

What is your experience with rivers? Describe the different rivers you have known?

What do you anticipate about rafting on the Ganges during WOW 8? Do you know where you will be rafting? sleeping? eating? hanging out?

What are the properties of water–at many scales? How do these properties determine the behavior and interaction of water with us? with the physical earth? with the living earth? with the entire earth system?

What do you think the opening epigraph means: “The 1.5 billion cubic kilometers of water on the earth are split by photosynthesis and reconstituted once every two million years or so.” ?

Explore these maps and aerial photographs:

AES

Questions: What part of Delhi is AES in? What part of India is AES in?

Our train

Question: How does it compare to other trains you’ve taken?

New Delhi Railway Station

Question: Can you find the likely route from AES to the New Delhi Railway Station?

The route

Questions:

How long in kilometers do you estimate the train ride to be? In which stations/cities/towns do you think the train will stop?

At one point on the trip the train changes directions—if you were facing forward you will now face backwards and vice versa. Can you find the place where you think this will happen?

Zoom along the route—farmland

Photo from the train

Questions:

What crops can you identify? What do you see people doing in the fields? What farm products do you see being transported on the roads? Do you have any connection with these products? You might be very fond of the crop being harvested in the picture. Any guesses?

What wild and or domesticated animals do you expect to see along the way?

From Haridwar to Rishikesh

Notice the terrain changes from Haridwar into the foothills. What do you think the different colors on the map mean? What do you think the lines mean? <http://s.hswstatic.com/gif/how-to-read-topographic-map-2.jpg>. The high Himalaya are not shown on this section of map. How much higher do you think they get? Look at the segment of the Ganges shown. What direction is it flowing (of course it is flowing downhill), but what compass direction does it flow from point to point along the portion that is shown? Why do you think that happens? 8th graders will raft much of the section of river that you see in the map. Find out about the term: Watershed.

 

 

 

Look at the aerial photo and try to trace the river down stream. Rapids are named on some of the areas when you zoom to a certain scale.

http://wikimapia.org/#lang=en&lat=30.145721&lon=78.598080&z=14&m=b&search=alaknanda%20river

This link is to a very nice booklet on river dynamics for rafting:

http://faculty.frostburg.edu/rpm/rkauffman/pdf_files/River%20Dynamics-Raft.pdf

The booklet also appears at this link but is not so convenient as the pdf version:

https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/view/31888300/river-dynamics-rafting-frostburg/34

Ecological and strategic importance of Tibetan Plateau: http://www.meltdownintibet.com/

At the moment the three episodes of a BBC documentary are available on dailymotion

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x1e1mkw

https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x40rs0v

https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x40rnfr

Killing the Ganges with Justin Rowlatt (AES parent)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hF1dUbSPuUA

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17 October Science 7 WOW preparation–River Walk–Binoculars Birds and Trees

  • Mindful moment.
  • Past DSN entry.
  • Today’s plan Blogpost
  • Create today’s DSN entry in Biodiversity folder.
  • Questions.

* * * * *

Using binoculars:

  • Always hung around neck.
  • Do not touch glass on lenses.
  • Keep dry and clean.
  • Do not drop.
  • Focus left eye first with main focusing knob. Then focus right eye with fine focus.
  • Open binoculars to fit distance between eyes. You should see one circular field of view.
  • Locate object of interest with eyes (no binoculars). Then raise binoculars to eyes while maintaining view of object. Learn how to do this to bring object into magnified view. It takes a little practice. (Do not try to search/scan with binoculars).
  • Practice following a bird, butterfly, dragonfly and keeping it in view while using the binoculars.
  • Practice keeping something in view while removing and raising binoculars.
  • Always return binoculars in good condition at the end of an activity.

How do you know what to look for when observing living things?

  • Observation schemes.
  • Always make note of time, date, location, conditions (weather, etc.)
  • 7 S’s of Bird-watching
  • Size, Silhouette, Shade, Sweep, Sound, Sign (including behavior), Surroundings

Tree-watching (specimen vs. species)

  • GBH
  • Leaf shape, size, structure, arrangement
  • Branching pattern
  • Habit
  • Flowers shape, size, structure, arrangement
  • Fruits shape, size, structure, arrangement
  • Bark

Plans for WOW 7 Science

  1. River walk–Along the Ganga (now paired with Zipline)
  2. Stream survey (Life in the stream)
  3. Riparian corridor (Life along the stream)
  4. Village walk (Human life in the valley)
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16 October Science 8 Chemical Reactions–Steel wool reactions–conservation of mass–properties of gases–crystal observations–matter observation and theory chart

  1. Mindful moment.
  2. Review previous DSN entry.
  3. Preview today’s blogpost.
  4. Create today’s DSN entry in the Matter folder.
  5. Questions.
  • * * * *

See the video on Brownian motion captured by Aadi and Sumair: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1HJYssXeGZsQ3GL4pjRneAh3ZlHMlP4mL/view?usp=sharing

Why is Brownian motion such important evidence in support of the idea that matter is composed of particles (atoms and molecules) that have certain properties and behaviors?

In his 1905 article: “Investigations on the theory of the Brownian Movement,” Einstein used other areas of science (like Newton’s Laws of Motion and associated concepts) to describe, explain and predict phenomena involving Brownian motion.

http://users.physik.fu-berlin.de/~kleinert/files/eins_brownian.pdf

https://briankoberlein.com/2015/05/05/shake-rattle-and-roll/

  • “What Einstein showed was that the diffusion of an object undergoing Brownian motion will diffuse at a particular rate (known as the mean squared displacement), and that this rate depended upon the number of atoms or molecules in a mole of the fluid in which the object is suspended (Avogadro’s number). From this one could determine the size of molecules or atoms. For the first time, a measurable quantity allowed us to probe the atomic realm. It wasn’t just the idea, but rather the precision of Einstein’s results that many scientists found so convincing.
  • Einstein’s work settled a dispute that had raged for nearly a century, and it placed kinetic theory on an experimental foundation. From this work, Newtonian physics, chemistry, and thermodynamics were connected.”

Do not open your steel wool experiment bottles. Observe them. What do you notice about the appearance of the bottles and the contents? How might you explain what has happened?

Find the mass of the two bottles with the steel wool experiments. Add your data to the spreadsheets.

Enter your data: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1rrd1tHdwl83TcklHU6S69Y0vZFU4qgvQ5qrY-VYF2ng/edit?usp=sharing

1718 Class spreadsheet: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/14FwGAKLDQq807T-ntdtD4Rp2dzveqX8HuAk3eunY2ws/edit?usp=sharing

Enter your data: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1tgEamXHYw64OTPBVGCRu3U9CtvMZCk5lz0oIpvgRqgQ/edit?usp=sharing

1718 Class spreadsheet: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/1_UM-F_4LSQtvW3e4PaJiFknqv0wamDnNJbtHj6x2e3c/edit?usp=sharing

Now we will test the gases in the two bottles. Ask questions if you do not understand any part of the procedures or the results.

  • Extracting the gas.
  • Flaming splint.
  • Glowing splint.
  • Density with respect to air.
  • Amount of gas produced or consumed?

View your crystals. Take photos and make sketches. Why is the phenomenon of crystalline substances having characteristic regular forms evidence for the Atomic Theory of Matter?

Work on your matter chart.

Send 1 sketch, 1 photo, 1 reflection from 3 different days to the editors of the current parent newsletter. This is required. Comply if you are asked for an interview.

A scene from the train for WOW8. We will be examining the carbon cycle starting in January. When you look out the train window on the trip to Haridwar, you will see some crops dominating the landscape. There are poplar trees (whose botanical origin is North America) and sugar cane from Asia-Pacific. These plants make important molecules that humans use intensively: cellulose and sucrose. What for–do you think? How do the plants do this–do you think? What are the myriad pathways by which a tree makes cellulose and a giant grass makes sucrose? Science encourages you to see a world full of action, movement, and change at all scales. Science encourages a mindful view of things.

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15 October Science 7 WOW 7 preparation–catching, observing, describing, releasing

  1. Mindful moment.
  2. Review past DSN entry.
  3. Preview blogpost for day.
  4. Create DSN entry for today. Today’s entry will go in the biodiversity folder.
  5. Questions.
  • * * * *

Today is preparation for examining life in the stream during WOW7. Many of these organisms that you will find are the larval stages of certain insects, like dragonflies. <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Js8ywgh48G0>

See this 2-part powerpoint about WOW 7 in 2012:

http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/files/2012/09/wowLife-in-the-streampt1a.pdf

http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/files/2012/09/wowLife-in-the-streampart2.pdf

How many times have you seen ants in your life? Make an estimate.

How many kinds (species) of ant do you think there are on the AES campus.

On a clean sheet of paper in landscape orientation, sketch what you think an ant looks like. Fill the space.

On the back of the sheet, write your full name and period.

How many kinds of spider do you think can be found in the AES rocks? Why?

How many of each kind? Where can spiders be found? How do various spiders capture prey?

Learn several techniques for capturing specimens of small (usually invertebrate) creatures. Then observe, describe (in writing–think of an observational scheme), sketch, photograph (if you can), video (if you can) (please send me any clearly focused photographs and videos), and release your specimen unharmed. Do your utmost to avoid causing any harm to the creatures in the process of catching and observing.

Keep a list and count of each kind of spider you find. (If you find other invertebrates, you may also add them to a different list.) Only small specimens need to be observed with the magiscopes. If you catch a specimen that is too large for the magiscope, you may use the hand lens and your unaided eye.

Some living this you might see on WOW7:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=3917635422847&l=1097fb07fd

Spiders from the Middle School Rocks in past years–and more: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10207430262498256.1073741902.1338342884&type=1&l=d15ed4251f

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12 October Science 8 Chemical reactions–Organizing our observations and connecting them/explaining them with the Atomic Theory of Matter

  1. Mindful moment.
  2. Previous DSN entry. Be sure you are keeping up.
  3. Preview plan for today on blogpost. Pay close attention to experiments and procedures.
  4. Create entry in your DSN for today in the matter folder.
  5. Questions.
  • * * * * *

A.With your partner, get a microscope, slide, and small piece of copper. Place the copper on the slide and bring it into focus on the lowest power. Try to take a picture with your ipad. When you are ready, we will put a drop of silver nitrate solution on the copper piece on the slide. Continue to observe carefully. Take pictures as you can. What do you see happening.

Timelapse by Denzel C. period 8 Science 8 10 October, 2018: <https://drive.google.com/file/d/1FAY6QMXNpnwFwAf62qLE-mIpTG9nptEr/view?usp=sharing>

Here is a depiction of the reaction. S means solid. Aq means aqueous–in water–a solution:

copper + silver nitrate → copper(II) nitrate + silver
Cu(s) + 2AgNO3(aq) → Cu(NO3)2(aq) + 2Ag(s)

The numbers give the ratio of atoms that combine. Notice that the same number and kind of atoms appear on each side of the reaction. This is why this expression is called an equation.

Try a similar observation with a piece of zinc. Here is the reaction equation:

Zn(s) + 2AgNO3(aq)Zn(NO3 )2 (aq) + 2Ag(s)

B.Let’s try to observe Brownian motion.

We will examine Brownian motion of fat globules in milk. See what you can find out about Brownian motion. The technique will be described in class.

See the videos showing Brownian motion of fat globules in milk. Apologies for the camera motion. The videos would have been better with a fixed camera. Nevertheless, it is possible to see the random movement of the fat globules. How is this movement interpreted in light of the atomic/molecular theory of matter? (Note: a microscopic fat globule is composed of a truly enormous number of too-small-to-see molecules–according to the theory.)

Video https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4DPwlouN3dIRHQ0NUw5RWtpNzg/view?usp=sharing

Video by Aadi and Sumair period 8:

For C and D below you will need two plastic bottles. Remove the label. Rinse them with water. Dry the outside thoroughly. You do not have to dry the inside. Put a piece of masking tape on the outside to serve as a label (name, period, data and time, which experimental condition)

C. Place a bit of the steel wool (that has had the coating of oil removed by soaking in vinegar) into a plastic drink bottle with a few drops of water. Close the lid tightly. Dry the outside of the bottle completely. Write your names, period, date, time, and steel wool in moist air on a piece of masking tape and place on the outside of the bottle. Find and record the mass of the bottle. We will examine you bottle next week. Be sure to include your expectations in your DSN entry for today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enter your data: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1rrd1tHdwl83TcklHU6S69Y0vZFU4qgvQ5qrY-VYF2ng/edit?usp=sharing

1718 Class spreadsheet: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/14FwGAKLDQq807T-ntdtD4Rp2dzveqX8HuAk3eunY2ws/edit?usp=sharing

D. Place a bit of steel wool into a bottle. Ask Dr. F how much. Cover the steel wool with vinegar. Tighten the lid. Dry the outside of the bottle. Label with tape–names, period, date, time, and steel wool immersed in vinegar. Find and record the mass of the bottle. We will examine your bottle next week. Be sure to include you expectations in your DSN entry for today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enter your data: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1tgEamXHYw64OTPBVGCRu3U9CtvMZCk5lz0oIpvgRqgQ/edit?usp=sharing

1718 Class spreadsheet: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/1_UM-F_4LSQtvW3e4PaJiFknqv0wamDnNJbtHj6x2e3c/edit?usp=sharing

E. Examine the crystal growth. Have any formed in your dishes? What do you notice about their shapes? Can you see an underlying pattern? Take pictures and make sketches. If you have not already watched this, do so before our next class:

What do crystals suggest about atoms? See this short video:

Mathematical Impressions: Attesting to Atoms

https://www.simonsfoundation.org/2013/02/01/mathematical-impressions-attesting-to-atoms/

Create and complete this chart with our class investigations to date (SEE TODAY’S BOARD):

Consider these big questions (KEEP IN VIEW-KIV QUESTIONS AND IDEAS):

  • What can we observe about the structure and behavior of matter?
  • How can we explain what we observe (at the scale of our senses) by structures, entities, and behaviors at a scale we cannot see?
  • How can such explanations be tested?
  • How can we tell if the atomic theory of matter is a workable/reasonable theory?
MATTER
LARGE SCALE OBSERVATIONS
LINKING EVIDENCE
ATOMIC-MOLECULAR SCALE STRUCTURES AND BEHAVIORS
DATA
ARGUMENT
THEORY

List all the activities and investigations

we have carried out with matter.

How can these be explained in terms of

the behavior and properties of atoms?

A few examples of large scale observations:

  • Water changing state. Temperature plateaus.
  • Salt water evaporating more rapidly than fresh water.
  • Conservation of mass–mass of ice  equals mass of melted water.
  • Crystal form of Sodium Chloride.
  • Solutions of magnesium sulphate and sodium carbonate reacting.
  • Vinger and baking soda reacting.
  • ETC.
  • The video recommended earlier in the year demonstrates how to take an observation of matter in the large scale and explain it in terms of what happens on the atomic scale. You should watch it if you have not already AND it is good to watch again: From The Ring of Truth by Philip Morrison. Atoms: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQ3mjb9BSaU

 

 

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11 Oct. Science 7 Pulling a cart with a constant force

A. Mindful moment.

B. Review previous DSN entries.

For example, have you completed the task outlined on 5 October. This will be a powerschool formative assessment!!!

http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2018/10/05/5-october-science-7-changing-speeds-and-more/

***All students: Reply to today’s blogpost. Describe how you think the pullback car works. What  do you think makes the car change its speed from 0 m/s to the other speeds you observe during a trip? What is the mechanism do you think? Make a sketch of your imagined mechanism and add link to blog–with sharing so that anyone with the link can view. Be sure the response that you submit on the blog is also copied into your DSN entry for the day.

Reply to another student’s comment. Ask a clarifying question about their sketch and the mechanism they have proposed. 

C. Preview today’s plan in the blogpost.

D. Create DSN entry for today in the motion folder.

E. Questions.

  • * * * *

Virtual day comments.

A. What will the motion of a cart look like when a constant force is applied in a horizontal direction? Make a sketch graph. Explain your thoughts in words. Be sure this is recorded in your DSN entry from our last class.

B. Large group discussion. In your notes today, record the expectations that your classmates have. Compare those expectations to your own. Be able to express an expectation and reason that are different from your own.

C. Let’s try to find out. We’ll need to arrange a measurement in a similar manner to what we have done before.

 

D. Let’s graph the motion.

Period 3 results:

Period 4 results:

What is your interpretation?

E. Inertia.

F. Force.

G. If time:

http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/files/2012/09/wowLife-in-the-streampt1a.pdf

http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/files/2012/09/wowLife-in-the-streampart2.pdf

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10 October Science 8 Crystals, chemical reactions, evidence for atoms and molecules

  1. Mindful moment. Think of the science journey in a chemical reaction. Think of the river you will ride on WOW 8.
  2. Review previous DSN. You now have investigated a bit from two chemical reactions.
  3. Preview today’s plan on the current blogpost.
  4. Create your DSN entry for today in the Matter folder.
  5. Questions.
  • * * * * *

Do you think this works? Try it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • * * * * *

A. Make a (super-) saturated solution using hot water. We will bring you 50 ml of hot water. Dissolve as much substance as you can in a beaker. Start with one spoonful. Pour only the liquid in a labeled petri dish; do not pour any solid material into the dish. Set the dish on the back country in a tray. Be careful not to spill any solution. Work neatly. Do not contaminate supplies. Clean spoons, glassware thoroughly before trying a different substance. Choose 2 different substances from this list. Be sure to label your petri dish with names, period, date, substance. (Remember that you have already observed Sodium Chloride crystals.)

Substances (Only use what you need. Do not inhale. Avoid contact.) :

  • Copper Sulphate                              CuSO4
  • Zinc Sulphate                                   ZnSO4
  • Aluminum Potassium Sulphate   KAl(SO4)2
  • Magnesium Sulfate                         MgSO4
  • Cobalt Sulphate                                CoSO4

B. With your partner, get a microscope, slide, and small piece of copper. Place the copper on the slide and bring it into focus on the lowest power. Try to take a picture with your ipad. When you are ready, we will put a drop of silver nitrate solution on the copper piece on the slide. Continue to observe carefully. Take pictures as you can. What do you see happening.

Timelapse by Denzel C. period 8 Science 8 10 October, 2018: <https://drive.google.com/file/d/1FAY6QMXNpnwFwAf62qLE-mIpTG9nptEr/view?usp=sharing>

Here is a depiction of the reaction. S means solid. Aq means aqueous–in water–a solution:

copper + silver nitrate → copper(II) nitrate + silver
Cu(s) + 2AgNO3(aq) → Cu(NO3)2(aq) + 2Ag(s)

The numbers give the ratio of atoms that combine. Notice that the same number and kind of atoms appear on each side of the reaction. This is why this expression is called an equation.

Try a similar observation with a piece of zinc. Here is the reaction equation:

Zn(s) + 2AgNO3(aq)Zn(NO3 )2 (aq) + 2Ag(s)

C. If time, we will try to observe Brownian motion. If no time, next class.

We will examine Brownian motion of fat globules in milk. See what you can find out about Brownian motion. The technique will be described in class.

See the videos showing Brownian motion of fat globules in milk. Apologies for the camera motion. The videos would have been better with a fixed camera. Nevertheless, it is possible to see the random movement of the fat globules. How is this movement interpreted in light of the atomic/molecular theory of matter? (Note: a microscopic fat globule is composed of a truly enormous number of too-small-to-see molecules–according to the theory.)

Video https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4DPwlouN3dIRHQ0NUw5RWtpNzg/view?usp=sharing

D. Create and complete this chart with our class investigations to date:

Consider these big questions (KEEP IN VIEW-KIV QUESTIONS AND IDEAS):

  • What can we observe about the structure and behavior of matter?
  • How can we explain what we observe (at the scale of our senses) by structures, entities, and behaviors at a scale we cannot see?
  • How can such explanations be tested?
MATTER
LARGE SCALE OBSERVATIONS
LINKING EVIDENCE
ATOMIC-MOLECULAR SCALE STRUCTURES AND BEHAVIORS
DATA
ARGUMENT
THEORY

List all the activities and investigations

we have carried out with matter.

How can these be explained in terms of

the behavior and properties of atoms?

A few examples of large scale observations:

  • Water changing state. Temperature plateaus.
  • Salt water evaporating more rapidly than fresh water.
  • Conservation of mass–mass of ice  equals mass of melted water.
  • Crystal form of Sodium Chloride.
  • Solutions of magnesium sulphate and sodium carbonate reacting.
  • Vinger and baking soda reacting.
  • ETC.

E. The video recommended earlier in the year demonstrates how to take an observation of matter in the large scale and explain it in terms of what happens on the atomic scale. You should watch it if you have not already AND it is good to watch again: From The Ring of Truth by Philip Morrison. Atoms: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQ3mjb9BSaU

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9 October Science 7–Virtual Day Plan–living things in our local environment

Happy Virtual Day in Science 7.

You can contact me at rfrazier@aes.ac.in

If you want to speak live, try facetime.

I will be watching email most of the day. I will be online for sure from 8:30-9:30 am, 2:30-3:30 pm and 10:00 to 11:00 am.

A. Start with a mindful moment on your own. Disconnect. Sit comfortably with good posture. Close your eyes. Breathe. Clear your mind for the day. Think of how amazing it is to be alive. What does it mean to be a living thing?

B. Review your previous DSN entry. Remember that you should have predicted what you think the result will be if a constant force is applied to a cart. This prediction should appear as a distance vs. time sketch graph AND as a written explanation of your thinking. We will carry out this experiment on Thursday.

C. Browse today’s blogpost. In it you will find the activity for our Virtual Day.

D. Create a new folder in your DSN called Biodiversity. You can move your partner tree folder into this new folder. Create todays DSN entry in the Biodiversity Folder. You only need to complete the activities described below. You do NOT need a separate entry for your DSN. The work you do today is the DSN entry for today.

E. Questions– email, reply to today’s blogpost, or even facetime if you have questions.

  • * * * * *

See the plan below. The link goes to the same information.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1es7aa8DH9aLCQG6ocaSHWu__I-R_6v44FB0JO6xexJE/edit?usp=sharing

Virtual Day Plan

October 9, 2018 – Day 3

A survey of your neighborhood.

In preparation for WOW and the science we will do there, we need to take the time to begin noticing and observing the natural world around us. What plants and animals can be found in the area near where you live? How many different types are there and can you see any relationships between them?

Procedure:

  1. Decide on the area around your home that you will observe. This could be the garden, a park a quiet street or anywhere else that you can safely make observations over time.
  2. Use google or another mapping program to generate an aerial map of this location. The map should be big enough to show the surrounding area, but small enough to see where you are with good accuracy.
  3. Observe this area for a minimum of 45 minutes. This could be in one single block or in two or three smaller ones. Your observations could be made during the day or in the evening.
  4. Record the time, date and weather conditions. You may also want to note what else is around the area (a construction site, a row of shops, a pond or pool, a highway, etc.).
  5. You can choose to survey any or all of the following:
    1. Trees
    2. Flowers
    3. Birds
    4. Other mammals, reptiles or insects
  6. Choose to observe things that are suitable to the area you are working in (For example – if you are 20 stories up in a highrise don’t try to observe cats on the ground).
  7. As you observe, take pictures and make sketches of the different organisms. You may use your ipad or another camera, but make sure the plant or animal is in focus and identifiable. Be sure to include captions for your photos and sketches. How many different kinds of things do you see within an individual category?
  8. How did you decide they are different?
  9. Describe the organisms you see – Use the resources below to aid your descriptions.

Product:

Create a new Google Doc. It needs to include your map, pictures or sketches and and observations (including date, time and weather). Write in complete sentences. If you used resources to help you identify what you observed list those as well.

This must be completed and submitted by 9:00pm on October 9, 2018. Submit this in your DSN entry in a folder called Biodiversity.

Observing living things:

How do we know what to look for?

Why is biodiversity important?

Biodiversity Survey Gorongosa Park in Mozambique–This is a really good video. Please watch.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjE6itdJuLc

Resources

Tree diagrams

Plants of India

Common Trees of Delhi

http://www.delhi.gov.in/wps/wcm/connect/90483a004f0347aca5f4af0f51fa40e8/DELHI+TREESSS.pdf?MOD=AJPERES&lmod=-1626515819&CACHEID=90483a004f0347aca5f4af0f51fa40e8

Most suitable trees for Delhi

http://www.thedelhiwalla.com/2016/05/31/city-list-pradip-krishens-most-suitable-trees-for-delhi/

http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/files/2017/03/suitabletreesdelhi.pdf

The Seven S’s of Birding

http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/files/2012/03/the_art_of_birding_part__2.pdf

  1. Shade 2. Size 3. Silhouette 4. Signs 5. Songs 6. Sweep 7. Surroundings

Some pictures of living things from this past weekend–east of Delhi 100+ km–near the Ganga. I have many pictures of living things from walking and biking around neighborhoods, the schoolyard, parks, nature areas in Delhi. It is amazing what you can see when you look and notice.

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8 October Science 8 Chemical reactions and evidence for existence of particles (atoms and molecules)

A. Mindful moment. Think of science journey questions: Where does it come from? Where does it go? What happens along the way? (From chemical reactions to earth cycles to the lives of stars)

B. Review previous DSN entry. Look at the results from 1718 and 1819.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1aIQhfCKNl8FY2tXlVlmV0e9TLiBK1QDfIe3k0bpgmn0/edit?usp=sharing

See the results from Sci 8 1718:

https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/1V5y4RdyVXmki565eVOHY-iOgfw_zY0L9tA1sFFcxzqQ/edit?usp=sharing

Here is a description of the reaction in words:

sodium carbonate + magnesium sulfate  —-> magnesium carbonate + sodium sulfate

NaCO3 + MgSO4 –> MgCO3 + NaSO4

How would you construct a histogram to show the pattern of mass change before and after this reaction using all the trials from the two years of grade 8?

Tomorrow is the new moon. It rises when the sun does. The moon is not visible on earth during this phase. Can you figure out why? (Hint: what do you know about light, reflection, shadows? Can you make a sketch of where the new moon is in relation to the earth and the sun? Why do we see–not see–what we do?)

C. Preview today’s blog.

D. Create today’s DSN entry in the matter folder.

E. Questions.

  • * * * * *
  1. Two-week window for revising and resubmitting summative project report on Mixing Ethanol and Water begins today. See Powerschool.
  2. Arrangement for issue 1 parent newsletter. Editors discuss plan.
  3. Carryout the following reaction:

Reaction 2.

Put 5 grams of sodium hydrogen carbonate (baking soda) in a small flask. Put 100 grams of vinegar (5% acetic acid) in a beaker. Find the mass of the flask and baking soda, the beaker and vinegar, AND a dropper as pictured. Next add drops of vinegar to the flask. Observe what happens. Describe in words. Take pictures. Continue adding until the baking soda has disappeared and no more reaction is apparent. Be very careful no to spill any material. Add the vinegar slowly so no material bubbles or splashes out of the flask. Find the mass at the end of the reaction. Use clean and dry plastic cups to bring materials to your table.

 

Enter your results in the class spreadsheet:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1fNRCJWAFWl0LFuMmzQpXmJzsLV9KB-6XMlpesCubcJ8/edit?usp=sharing

See the results from Science 8 1718:

https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/1FPUcINAnYp8lzIQGBFd4dMElVeuZnXBipljpH9gRzgA/edit?usp=sharing

A description of the reaction:

Sodium hydrogen carbonate + acetic acid —>Sodium acetate + water + carbon dioxide

NaHCO3+CH3COOHCH3COONa(in solution)+H2O(liquid)+CO2(gas)

Be sure to record your observations, thoughts, discussion points with partner, and questions. Make a rich and thorough DSN entry for this experiment–especially as compared to reaction before.

3. Crystals and crystallization:

Make saturated solutions of other substances provided. Pour a little of your saturated solution in a petri dish labeled with your names, period, substance, date and time. Set it on the counter top at the back of the room. You can set up one petri dish  / substance.

Take pictures.

What do crystals suggest about atoms? See this short video:

Mathematical Impressions: Attesting to Atoms

https://www.simonsfoundation.org/2013/02/01/mathematical-impressions-attesting-to-atoms/

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5 October Science 7 Changing speeds and more

A. Mindful moment. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mopikvt114

B. Review previous DSN entry.

C. Preview blogpost for the day.

D. Create new DSN entry for the day. (Motion folder)

E. Questions.

  • * * * * *

“As a boy, I was fascinated by speed, by the wild range of speeds in the world around me. People moved at different speeds; animals so much more so. The wings of insects moved too fast to see, though one could just their frequency by the tone they emitted–a hateful noise, a high E, with mosquitoes, or a lovely bass hum with the bumblebees that flew around the hollyhocks each summer. Our pet tortoise, which could take an entire day to cross the lawn, seemed to live in a different time frame altogether. But what then of the movement of plants? I would come down to the garden in the morning and find the hollyhock a little higher, the roses more entwined around their trellis, but, however patient I was, I never could catch them moving.”

Oliver Sacks in “Speed,” an essay from The River of Consciousness (2017). Picador.

  • * * * * *

Finish investigation of pullback car from previous class.

A. Make a new group of 3. These should be students you have not worked with before (or have worked with the fewest number of times). Update your collaboration chart / document. Names, topics, activities, dates, links (relevant blogposts, DSN entries, group documents and data)

You will receive a pullback car. Explore its operation. Do not overstretch the spring, but do find the point that gives maximum acceleration and distance. Do a trial run without measuring. Each student separately make a sketch graph (distance vs. time) of how you think the motion would look. Discuss with your group your ideas using your sketch graph to illustrate your point. Make sure you have a rich entry for the section “what we talked about” in your DSN entry.

Design a track (frame of reference) to evaluate how the speed changes. This will be very similar to your tumble buggy procedure. Find the times to reach various distances. Make a distance vs. time graph to display your results. Calculate the average speed for zero meters to the maximum distance you measure. Can you find average speeds for other segments, like from 0-1, 1-2, and 2-3 meters?

Compare a graph that shows average speeds from 0-1, 0-2, and 0-3 meters with a graph that shows average speeds for 0-1, 1-2, and 2-3 meters.

What happens to the graph if average speeds are found for smaller and smaller segments of distance and time?

Be prepared to share your findings with the rest of the class.

***All students: Reply to today’s blogpost. Describe how you think the pullback car works. What  do you think makes the car change its speed from 0 m/s to the other speeds you observe during a trip? What is the mechanism do you think? Make a sketch of your imagined mechanism and add link to blog–with sharing so that anyone with the link can view. Be sure the response that you submit on the blog is also copied into your DSN entry for the day.

Reply to another student’s comment. Ask a clarifying question about their sketch and the mechanism they have proposed. 

B. Thought problem. Answer with a sketch graph (distance vs. time) and description. If a cart is pulled with a constant force, what motion do you think will result?

C. We shall watch and discuss in detail the motion examples presented in: Frames of Reference < https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bJMYoj4hHqU >. What is your understanding of the statement, “All motion is relative?” If we do not have time to watch this as a class, watch on your own. Have your questions ready. Be prepared for a quiz in an upcoming class.

This is good. Take a look: https://www.arborsci.com/cool/newtons-laws-revisited/?utm_source=Coolstuff+Newsletter&utm_campaign=e6f82091c1-Newton%27s+Laws+Revisited&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c5b08a4766-e6f82091c1-229626089&mc_cid=e6f82091c1&mc_eid=08e9d4773a

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