22 August Science 7 Analyzing the popcorn data; completing the report

In groups finalize the sections of the report.

Background

Question and Expectation

Procedure

Results

We will put these first parts together and conduct a group discussion focused on completeness, accuracy, style.

All students are expected to attend to the discussion and to participate in the group process.

We will look at two graphs–a histogram (frequency bar graph) of the number of popped kernels plotted against the distance from the pan–and a temperature versus time graph of the pan as it heated up.

We will consider other graphs that could be made from our data. We will also think about date we could have acquired that would yield other graphs.

We will look for patterns in the data.

We will then work in groups on a discussion/analysis section and a conclusion.

Once all the sections are satisfactory to the members of the class, we will put the report together and share with everyone. This will give each student a model of a scientific report based on common experience.

In the next part of our course we will learn scientific ideas about investigating motion. These include how to measure and analyze motion.

 

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21 August Science 8 What is a flame? 5 Elements and their haikus and evidence for the existence of atoms

Watch the eclipse online:

“Live video streams of the August 21 total solar eclipse, from NASA Television and locations across the country, will be available on this page”: https://www.nasa.gov/eclipselive-info

12 p.m. EDT (9:30 pm Indian Standard Time)- Eclipse Preview Show, hosted from Charleston, South Carolina.
1 p.m. EDT (10:30 pm Indian Standard Time)- Solar Eclipse: Through the Eyes of NASA. From Portland, OR: “The Comfort Suites in Corvallis normally costs about $128 for the night, however, during the weekend of the eclipse, rooms are going for as much as $1,300.” http://koin.com/2017/08/16/hotel-prices-soar-as-solar-eclipse-approaches/

More on the eclipse: https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/solar/2017-august-21

Stay with most recent partners for the lab activity during the second part of class.

What is a flame?

In class answer the following questions on lined paper. Include your name and period. When you are finished take a picture of what you have written and upload in your digital science notebook for the class. You may use your notes–you may access your DSN, but do not visit any other online site. Do not consult with other students.

  1. Compare your observations of the candle flame with the explanation offered in the video.
  2. What is your explanation for relighting the candle without touching it with a flame?
  3. Why do you think a candle will light and burn right side up but not upside down?
  4. Use sketches and words to offer an explanation for why the candle eventually burns out when enclosed by a jar or flask
  5. Use sketches and words to offer an explanation for why water rises in the inverted jar that is placed over a burning candle that has been placed in a basin of water.
  6. What is your best idea for why Michael Faraday compared the burning of a candle to the living process of respiration / metabolism (breathing and using food for energy)?
  7. In the Lego activity, what is analogous with a kind of atom?
  8. In the Lego activity, what is analogous with a kind of molecule?
  9. Each element is comprised of one kind of atom. Why do you think there are only a limited number of elements (just over 100)?
  10. What did you find out about 5 elements of your choosing?
  11. How did you interpret the haiku associated with your chosen elements.
  12. Why do you think scientists developed the idea of atoms and molecules to explain the behavior and properties of matter?

Periodic Table of Elements in Haiku http://vis.sciencemag.org/chemhaiku/

See this periodic table of videos (about elements) http://www.periodicvideos.com/

These references are important and useful. Make sure you examine them. Ask questions about whatever you do not understand. It is essential that you understand what evidence scientists have used to develop the explanation called: The Atomic Theory of Matter (also called the Kinetic-Molecular Theory of Matter).

See the directions below to begin to address the question:

If matter is based on discrete particles (atoms and molecules), how small must a particle be?

Just how big might a particle of matter be? Cutting matter down to size.

potpermang

  • Work with your candle partner.
  • Find the mass of the small plastic dish. Take one crystal of potassium permanganate and place in the dish and find the mass. (Remember that the mass of the crystal and dish – the mass of the (empty) dish = the mass of the crystal. Record your procedure and results (always).
  • Next put the crystal and dish under the microscope (Magiscope). (Be sure you know how to use the scope properly.) Record your observations. Make a sketch. Take photos with your Ipad.
  • Use a ruler to estimate the volume of the crystal.
  • Put the crystal of potassium permanganate in a test tube. Add 1 cm of water. Dissolve the crystal completely by shaking vigorously with your thumb over the end of the test tube. Then add water to a total volume of 10 cm. This is a ‘10 times’ dilution. Pour this 10 cmof purple solution into a 100 cmbeaker and then fill up the beaker with water. This is now ‘100 times’ dilution. Fill the 10 cmtest tube with this solution and throw the rest away. Dilute this again in the beaker to 100 cm. It is now a ‘1000 times’ dilution.
  • Save samples of your dilutions. Arrange them in a row and take a picture. See this: 
  • How many times can the solution be diluted by a factor of 10 before the color is so pale that it is just visible?
  •  *The final dilution factor indicates that if matter is made of small particles, that these particles must be very small.
  • FYI–Potassium permanganate has the chemical formula: KMnO4–this means there is one atom of potassium (K), one atom of Manganese (Mn), and 4 atoms of Oxygen (O) in one molecule.

Points of reflection:

  • How do you imagine that light interacts with matter? What makes the crystal and solutions purple?
  • How do you think light interacts with your eye?
  • What do you think happens when something dissolves?
  • Why would more of one substance dissolve in a certain amount of water than another substance? Why would there be differences in solubility?
  • What differences do you think there are between dissolving and melting?
  • What are your own questions and ideas?
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18 August Science 7 Introduction to motion continued

Period 1

Refer to previous blog post: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2017/08/15/16-august-science-7-continuing-an-introduction-to-the-scientific-study-of-motion/

Spend 20 minutes on composing the group report on the popcorn experiment. Make sure everyone has access to the parts of the composition. We will complete the experiment and report in the next class.

Complete your section of the popcorn report. You should collaborate to compose your assigned section.

Group 1: Background: Tomas, Boris, Dowoo, Heejun

Group 2: Question and Expecation(s): Chihaya, Bailey, JaeHun

Group 3: Procedure:Anton, YeonWoo, Yaroslav, Pauline

Group 4: Results: Avanka, Denzel, Michal

Background: Explain what you know about popcorn and the process of popping corn. What are your ideas about motion and energy? What are your ideas about heat? What do you want to know and what do you think you need to know?

Question: We already stated the question.

Expectations: What did you expect to happen before we did it? What were the reasons for the expectations?

Procedure: What did we do in order to address the question? Explain everything in an organized fashion. (What have not yet analyzed the results, so we don’t yet have procedures for that part). Write in past tense and first / third person.

Results:

Match the times and temperatures.

Make a table for the popped kernels: Left in the pan; On the target from 0-20; 20-40; 40-60; 60-80;80-100; 100-120; over 120.

Make a table for the unpopped kernels.

List any other quantitative data you have.

Spend 30-40 minutes: As a whole class watch the video straight through: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PhVy1WG_lKQ

In groups discuss the worksheet. You may review the video. Keep the volume low and do not disturb the other groups. Frames-of-Reference-Worksheet

As a group, begin reading: Moving Relatively or Relatively Moving? from The Story of Science by Joy Hakim.

Note new ideas, new words, your questions.

If you finish, examine the following document: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/files/2013/01/Car-scenarios-3.pdf

Period 3

Refer to previous blogpost: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2017/08/15/16-august-science-7-continuing-an-introduction-to-the-scientific-study-of-motion/

We will conduct the popcorn experiment, gather the data, and begin the analysis and the writing of the report.

Additionally, you should watch the video Frames of Reference. This may be done as homework: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PhVy1WG_lKQ

You might find this worksheet helpful: Frames-of-Reference-Worksheet

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14 and 17 August Science 8 Breathing and Burning–what do you think? (Lego Analogy and Periodic Table)

We will form pairs arbitrarily today. (Groups will be formed throughout the year by different methods). No matter what group you are in, it is expected that you will do your best, that you will contribute positively, and that you will work with good will to have a successful collaboration. How well you participate in group work directly relates to the Respect and Collaboration learning habits.

Start keeping a list of the people you work with. Include name, date, activity, contact information.

Read this short piece on breathing. The ideas relate to ideas we will examine throughout the year. Think about what you know and what you think you know about oxygen, for example. The author of the piece wants the reader to be more mindful about some fundamental ideas, like, “oxygen has to come from somewhere,” and to realize the significance of these ideas and other details because breathing is something we all must do to stay alive.

Use this strategy for reading (even text that you find difficult): Read an entire passage through without stopping to look up words or to translate. You could do a paragraph, a page, or the whole piece. Then write a summary of what you have read. Compare this initial understanding with a partner and/or with your group. This technique emphasizes what you do understand rather than what you do not. This positive approach will help your reading develop much more than stopping for every word you do not know. Then you should go back over the passage and look up / translate ONLY words that you think are critical to the meaning. In all efforts to comprehend, you will want to identify the BIG IDEAS and the SIGNIFICANT DETAILS. Check your understanding through discussion with others. Sometimes you may miss something; other times you may have found a new perspective.

Begin keeping a vocabulary list for words and phrases used in the class that are new to you. Practice using the words in your discussions and writings. Keep this list in your digital science notebook.

http://ocean.si.edu/ocean-news/every-breath-you-take-thank-ocean

Here is another short article published this past June. It is about water–and especially water in India. Again, the author wants the reader to realize that an important substance, one that you must have to stay alive, responds to human activity in certain ways, and those ways of behaving depend on the properties of the substance. This year we want to examine what the properties of important substances like water are and what the consequences of these properties are for determining the behavior in the environment.

https://e360.yale.edu/features/running-dry-seeking-solutions-to-south-asias-looming-water-crisis

Last week, we ate some watermelon, drank some water, and breathed some air as a part of an introduction to the study of matter. Today we want to carry on with our investigation by examining a fairly common experience, observing a burning candle flame. The great English scientist, Michael Faraday, claimed that whole of chemistry could be treated just by carefully considering all aspects of a candle. (Faraday–Chemical History of a Candle: See this website with videos, free text, commentary, activities, etc. <http://engineerguy.com/faraday/>.The co-author, Dr. Don DeCoste, and I shared an office at the University of Illinois in 1994-95. We were both completing our Ph.D.’s . We also had some of the same graduate mentors on our respective committees.)

Things to do today–finish as much as you can–be sure to create a complete entry for your digital science notebook:

  1. Listen to and note all the safety guidelines. You will be using flame. You must be careful. (Those with long hair must pull it back. Everyone must wear eye protection. All must use materials properly, carefully, respectfully. No joking around. The flame is hot. The melted wax is hot. Do not burn yourself or others)
  2. Review the use of the triple beam balance. Zero the balance. Check your ability to read the scales.
  3. Find the mass of the candle. Record it.
  4. Set the candle in the container provided. You may need to light it first and let a little wax drip onto the container and then rest the end of the candle in the puddle while it re-solidifies.
  5. Light the candle. Keep track of the total time the candle is lit.
  6. Carefully observe the flame. Record
  7. Sketch the flame indicating any “structure” you notice. Label your sketch.
  8. Note the shape of the flame.
  9. Note the shape of the area where the wick meets the wax.
  10. Note the colors of the flame and the regions.
  11. We will turn off the lights.
  12. With a flashlight and a notecard screen, try to view and both sketch and photograph the shadow of the flame.
  13. Also try to the a photo of the flame with as much detail as you can. You can try with the lights on and with them off.
  14. Compare your sketches of the flame and its shadow.
  15. Compare the photos of the flame and its shadow.
  16. Be sure that you are writing down thoughts and questions you have about your observations. Discuss your ideas and questions with your partner? What are some possible explanations for what you see?
  17. While the candle is lit, carefully turn it upside down. What happens? Why do you think that might be?
  18. Take an unlit candle and hold it upside down. Light it. What happens?
  19. Weigh the candle and any of the melted wax after the candle has been burning? How does the mass compare before burning and after burning? How long did the candle burn between these two weighings? How would you explain the result?
  20. Light a second candle and hold the flame 2-4 cm from the flame of the first candle. Gently blow out the first candle flame and then move the other flame in to the smoke from the first flame. Do you have to touch the wick in order to get the candle to relight? Write your observations below. What does this tell you about the part of the candle that is burning?
  21. Place approximately 150 ml of ice water in a 250 ml beaker. Dry the outside of the beaker. Hold the beaker about 4-5 cm above the flame. Look for the formation of a new compound on the bottom of the beaker. Note: you may see the formation of black soot on the bottom of the beaker. That is not the compound that we are looking for. If you see soot, you are probably holding the candle too close to the flame. Record your observations.
  22. Pour water in to the pan that the candle is in to a depth of 1cm. Quickly lower the mouth of the Erlenmeyer flask over the candle so that the mouth of the candle is below the surface of the water. Hold the flask in place and carefully observe the system and record your observations.
  23. Without taking the mouth of the flask out of the water, slip your hand to cover the flask or fit a stopper into the mouth of the flask. Turn the flask right side up and examine the result. How might you explain the result?
  24. How could you test your ideas? Be prepared to share your thoughts.
  25. If there is time, and if there are no safety hazards, carry out some of your test. Check with Dr. F first.
  26. Be sure that you have a written account of what you have done, what you have seen, what you have talked about with your partner, and what you have thought and wondered.
  27. Make a sketch of your possible explanations for the things you have observed.
  28. Faraday claims at the end of his lectures on the Chemical History of a Candle that the burning of a candle is essentially the same thing as respiration. What do you think he could possibly have meant?

Watch some or all of the lectures recreated by Professor Bill Hammack http://engineerguy.com/faraday/

Find out more about Faraday: https://www.famousscientists.org/michael-faraday/

See Dr. F’s pictures below–you can probably do much better:

 

A Lego Analogy–how can all the different kinds of materials be composed of only a limited number of building blocks?

  1. Work with your current partner.
  2. You will get a set of legos.
  3. Describe the different pieces that you have. Determine the “properties” or “characteristics” of lego pieces. Make an organized chart. (Lego pieces should not be mixed between groups of students.)
  4. Record your ideas, questions, observations, etc. in your notebooks.
  5. Predict how many different objects you think you can make. Give reasons for your prediction.
  6. Begin constructing new objects with various combinations of the lego pieces. Observe and describe each new object. Develop a systematic way of recording your creations.
  7. After some time, stop and  compare across groups how many different objects students have made. Record and share your comments and questions.
  8. End with a discussion about atoms and molecules; elements and compounds.
  9. Find out what you can about the periodic table. See what free apps you can find for your ipads. Explore appropriate apps and websites.
  10. See this Periodic Table done in Haiku. < http://science.sciencemag.org/content/357/6350/461> Here’s an interactive table: <http://vis.sciencemag.org/chemhaiku>.
  11. Pick out 5 elements. Examine their properties on the standards table and then look at them on the Haiku table. Interpret the haikus.
  12. What is the main idea with the lego analogy to the atomic theory of matter?
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16 August Science 7 Continuing an introduction to the scientific study of motion

Today we want to investigate an event that vividly links energy and motion. We will try to clarify concepts in the study of motion and energy that might apply to what we see.

There are several purposes for using the event and investigation as an introduction to our study of motion.

  • We want to engage in the practices of scientific investigation. One of the three dimensions of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) is called Science and Engineering Practices. We will try to identify various practices as we conduct the investigation, gather and analyze results, and write and present the findings.
  • We want to use science to look for patterns in apparent chaos. The dimension in the NGSS of Cross Cutting Concepts identify some of the characteristics of the ways scientists think. One is finding patterns. The target event looks like a mess in the first view. However, it is possible with scientific techniques to find patterns in the seeming chaos.
  • One of the practices and tools for thinking is graphing. Graphing is one of the main analytical tools you will learn and use this year. It is important to become fluent with making and interpreting graphs.
  • In any genuine scientific inquiry new questions arise as soon as answers to the original questions are sought. This generative nature of scientific work means that it is always productive. If you develop a scientific mindset, your life will seldom be boring.
  • By learning to write the report, which we will do collaboratively, you will have a clear example of how a scientific report is composed and what value this customary genre has for building scientific knowledge.
  • We will want to keep the event and investigation in view when we launch rockets and hot air balloons later in the semester. (KIV = keep in view) Concepts in science are inter-connected.

The format for a scientific report can help you organize your thoughts as well as the ways you carry out an investigation. The format reminds you of what you need to pay attention to and what you need to include.

  • Question: What happens when popcorn is popped in a pan without a lid?
  • (See the list of questions taped to the cabinets on the south wall of M313. These are progressive examples of questions to consider as you carry out investigations in Science 7. Think of the practice of science as activity that is driven by questions and the endeavor to develop answers to questions.)
  • Background: What is your knowledge of and experience with popcorn? What do you know about the process of popping corn? What do you know or think you know about heat? What do you know or think you know about motion?
  • (Always evaluate the state of your knowledge about any phenomenon under scrutiny. What are your concepts? What are your theories? What do you know or think you know? What are your questions about the phenomenon? What are the limits of your knowledge? What do you need/want to find out?)
  • Expectations: What to you expect “to happen?” Why do you expect this?
  • (Always outline what you expect the answer to the proposed question to be. Explain as best you can what you base your expectation on. The expectation and reason is a less formal way of making a prediction and proposing a suspected or possible explanation–sometimes the called an hypothesis. Many students have heard the word hypothesis before they have really understood. Some students confuse prediction with hypothesis. Some students think a particular sentence frame guarantees a hypothesis–like “if, then” or “if, then, because.” Many authentic scientific papers state the hypothesis and prediction without the “if, then” or “if, then, because” form. At this stage of your science education, it is fine to think in terms of expectation and reasons for the expectation. As your skill and experience with scientific investigation grow, we will introduce and develop the proper use and understanding of reasoning involving hypotheses, predictions, experiment, evidence, and deductive and inductive reasoning. You do not need to use the word hypothesis prematurely.)
  • Procedure: What did we do in order to address the question?
  • (Always write in past tense and first or third person. We will write some of this together in class. The test of a complete and clear procedure is when a person of equivalent experience and knowledge can read the account and could reproduce it if he or she chose. This does not mean that the procedure should be written like a recipe of commands. No real scientist ever writes procedures they have carried out as a set of commands. Avoid writing commands when you describe procedures you have carried out.)
  • Results: What happened?
  • (This is the section in which the results are revealed. Both quantitative and qualitative data can be included. In science relevant quantitative data is highly valued. All presentations of date should be well-labelled and organized. Both tables and graphs are important. If data can be graphed in ways that shed like on possible answers to the question, graphs must be created and included. We will develop an essential set of guidelines for graphing. We will also look at different kinds of graphs. An important skill to develop is knowing which kind of graph is appropriate for the question and the data. Well-labeled and well-organized mages and anecdotal observations may also be important and should be included. No discussion of the results takes place in this section–only presentation.
  • Analysis or Discussion: What do the results suggest about answer(s) to the question?
  • (This is a most important section of a scientific report. This needs to be thorough and thoughtful. We will work on developing an analysis section collaboratively as a class.)
  • Conclusion: How can the question, procedure, and results be summarized briefly? What are the implications of the findings? What are some changes in the procedure? What are new questions and expectations that arise from the investigation.

beginningwithoutaconclusion (An article about this activity by a much younger Dr. F)

The video below is not about our investigation, per se, but it does relate to the biological history of corn and the process of popping it. We will look closely at this example during second semester when we examine the growth, development, and reproduction of living things along with biodiversity, natural (and artificial) selection, and evolution.

 

 

 

 

 

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9 and 11 August Science 7 DSN and Riding a bike

fietspad

 

 

Part I.

  • Create a new folder in google drive
  • Name it
  • First initial family name DSN7 1718 (rfrazier DSN7 1718)
  • Share with Dr. Frazier (editing)
  • Share with Parents (viewing)
  • Inside DSN7 create a folder
  • Name it
  • First initial family name Motion (rfrazier motion)
  • Inside DSN7 create a folder
  • First initial family name Energy (rfrazier energy)
  • Create a new document in the motion folder
  • Name it
  • First initial family name 8 Aug ridebike (rfrazier 8 Aug ridebike)
  • This is the first entry in your digital science notebook. Follow the guidelines. Create a new entry (doc) for every class. This is standing classwork (and if you do not finish, homework).
  • 3 ways to create entry.
  1. Use an app of your choice and upload entry into your google folder / DSN
  2. Handwrite in your paper notebook. Clearly, neatly, darkly. Take a well-focused, well-oriented, properly exposed pictures with your ipad. And upload (following the naming guidelines for files)
  3. Handwrite in your paper notebook. Review what you have written and create a digital entry using the app of your choice and uploading to your DSN/google folder as described.

Part II.

  1. Return writing on about learning to ride a bicycle to students (collect all at the end of class).
  2. Put students in pairs (try to mix up the groups).
  3. Have students interview each other about what they have written.
  4. Encourage students to ask questions of each other about what they have written.
  5. Have each student then introduce their partner, giving some background information in addition to comments about the experience they remember, their knowledge of motion, how they remember learning, what mode of learning they recommend.
  6. During the introductions, have students begin taking notes in their notebook. Entries should be dated and titled. Today’s title can be, “Beginning our study of motion.”
  7. Notes should include each person’s name in the class and a comment about them with respect to their memories and ideas about learning to ride a bike.
  8. After all the introductions, ask the class to write a response in their notebooks to this question: What do you think about using the example of learning to ride a bike as a way to begin our study of motion?

Part III.

A scientist explores learning to ride a bike:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MFzDaBzBlL0

  • Watch the video all the way through once.
  • Write a summary of what you do understand.
  • Write any questions you have as a result of watching the video.

Then watch again and pause after the scientist/engineer makes various points and introduces interesting vocabulary. Discuss each video segment.

  • What, for example, do you think he means by saying “knowledge is not understanding.”
  • For example, what do you think the he means by “neuroplasticity?”
  • What about “cognitive bias?”
  • What other terms, phrases, and concepts does the scientist/engineer use that seem to be related to motion and to learning? What do you think are the most important points? Why?
  • What is the sequence and structure of the scientist/engineer’s investigation?
  • What experiences from your own life (in or out of school) are you reminded of after watching the video?
  • Do you think there are different kinds of understanding? What for example is the difference between “learning how (to do something)” and “learning that (something is the case)?”

An experiment to introduce motion and energy!!! Everybody helps. Look at the sequence of questions on the cabinets on the south wall.

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10 August Science 8 Beginning our study of matter

Read this document. Keep it for continual reference during our study of matter.

Fundamental-questions-about-matter

Questions from previous class.

Name cards

Paper Notebooks

Digital science notebooks

  • Create a new folder in google drive
  • Name it
  • First initial family name DSN8 1718 (rfrazier DSN8 1718)
  • Share with Dr. Frazier (editing)
  • Share with Parents viewing
  • Inside DSN8 create a folder
  • Name it
  • First initial family name Matter (rfrazier matter)
  • Inside DSN8 create a folder
  • First initial family name Astronomy (rfrazier astronomy)
  • Create a new document in the matter folder
  • Name it
  • For 10 August create an entry/doc named (rfrazier 10 Aug Food and matter)
  • This is the first entry in your digital science notebook. Follow the guidelines. Create a new entry (doc) for every class. This is standing classwork (and if you do not finish, homework)

3 ways to create entry.

  1. Use an app of your choice and upload entry into your google folder / DSN
  2. Handwrite in your paper notebook. Clearly, neatly, darkly. Take a well-focused, well-oriented, properly exposed pictures with your ipad. And upload (following the naming guidelines for files)
  3. Handwrite in your paper notebook. Review what you have written and create a digital entry using the app of your choice and uploading to your DSN/google folder as described.

Guidelines for the digital science notebook.

Digital Science Notebook Science 8

Favorite meal

  1. Return writing on favorite meal to students (collected at end of previous class).
  2. Put students in pairs.
  3. Have students interview each other about what they have written.
  4. Encourage students to ask questions of each other about what they have written.
  5. Have each student then introduce their partner, giving some background information in addition to comments about food and the favorite meal.
  6. Today’s work needs to be documented in your digital science notebook.
  7. Notes should include each person’s name in the class and a comment about them with respect to their favorite meal.
  8. After all the introductions, ask the class to write a response in their notebooks to this question:
  9. What do you think about using food to begin our study of matter?

Part III.

  1. Pass out paper towels to each student.
  2. Display watermelon.
  3. Ask students to examine the fruit. Ask, “How do think it was made? What do you think it is made of?”
  4. Cut the watermelon. Allow students to observe, sketch, photograph.
  5. Have students write responses in their notebooks and then discuss briefly during the rest of part III.
  6. Distribute pieces of watermelon and have them taste.
  7. Ask, “What makes the melon sweet? What makes it wet? Where do you think the sweetness comes from? Where do you think the water comes from? How do you think the sweetness and the water get into the watermelon? What do you think is the smallest piece that would still give the taste? What do you think is the smallest piece that could still be considered water?”
  8. Tell the students to slowly and mindfully eat the rest and to savor the tastes. Ask, “What do you think you are tasting? How do you think taste works? Think of the long interwoven story of how all the parts of the watermelon came together to result in what you are eating.”
  9. Say to the students, “Imagine the watermelon breaking into smaller and smaller pieces. What is the smallest piece you can imagine? What do you think happens to those pieces once they are in your body? What is the difference do you think between food used for fuel and food used for building material? What about the water—what happens to the water once it is in your body?”
  10. Next, pour every student a small cup of water.
  • Have students close their eyes and then take a sip of water and hold it in their mouths for a moment before swallowing.
  1. Ask, “What do you think happens to the water that goes into your body? How does the drinking water compare to that from the melon? Where do you think the water has come from? Where do you think it will go? What do you think water is made of? How do you think you could take water apart?” (Students should be writing. Brief discussion can address these questions.).
  2. Next have students close their eyes again. Dim the lights. Ask students to get comfortable and to begin breathing slowly and easily. They can count silently 1, 2, 3, 4 for an in breath 5, 6, 7, 8 for an out breath.
  3. After a few moments of breathing, ask students what they think is in the breath they take? What is in the out breath? What do they think happens to the air that enters their bodies? What do they think makes up the atmosphere? How do they think the atmosphere got to be like it is?
  • Allow the students some time to write and reflect on Matter—what I know, understand, and wonder about food, water, and air.
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8 August 2017 Science 8 Welcome

A warm welcome to the 8th grade scientists in periods 5,6, and 8 with Dr. Frazier. So very nice to see familiar faces and it is extra special to meet new students. I wish the very best learning experiences in science this year. cropped-silver4.jpg

 

(photograph of silver crystals through microscope by AES 8th grade science students)crystal2a

(photograph of sodium acetate crystals by AES 8th grade science students)

There are several stories to be told, created, and investigated in science 8.

 

Some geological artifacts–forms of matter

What are things made of, where do they come from, where do they go? what happens along the way?

We start the year with the very small, expand out into the solar system and beyond, and return to the only earth we’ve got.

We want to do much exploring this year with our minds and our hands. For a first piece of writing in 2017-2018, please respond on lined paper to the following:

  • Name
  • Period
  • Time in India and time at AES
  • Family—what brings your family to India? What do your parents do? Brothers and sisters? Other family?
  • Where do you call home? What is your passport country? What countries have you lived in?
  • Write about the best meal you had during the summer.
  • What were the foods?
  • How were they prepared?
  • What were the ingredients and where did they come from in your particular meal and in history?
  • What is the story on how the various ingredients became food? 
  • What happened to the food after you ate it?
  • What made it the best meal?

Turn in your paper with your name and period written on it. You will be asked to share.

Let’s make name “plates” next. Please fold an index card longways. Then on an outer facing side with the fold on top, print your name clearly. Make it dark and as large as possible. See picture.

IMG_0050

Next take the notebook you are given and write your name on the first page along with your period and Science 8. Also label the front of the notebook with masking tape (see picture below). Bring the notebook to EVERY class. We will discuss how to keep your notebook up-to-date later this week. (btw, you will also be keeping a digital science notebook.)

IMG_0051

Notebook entry 1.

First day Science 8. 8 August 2017

Review the guidelines for the digital science notebook: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/science-8-2/digital-science-notebook-science-8/

  1. Include notes on any important information. Class blog: < rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in >. Syllabus. Classroom procedures. Notebook.
  2. What we did?
  3. What we saw?
  4. What we talked about?
  5. What you think and wonder?
  6. A sketch to help you remember and think.
  7. A photo to help you remember and think.
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8 August 2017 Science 7 Welcome

A very warm welcome to this year’s period 1 and 3 Science 7 classes with Dr. Frazier. It is so exciting to meet you. I wish you the very best learning experience in science this year.

wesspinningbikewheel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(11 month old learning about wheels on the scooter bike)learningtoride

 

(pre-school children–one boy is riding a bike with training wheels; the other is riding a bike with no pedals.)

I’d like to find out more about you and also encourage you to start thinking about our first topic of motion as well as the general issue of thinking about how people learn. Please respond to the following on lined paper with your name, period, and some introductory information included.

  • Name
  • Period
  • Time in India and time at AES
  • Family—what brings your family to India? What do your parents do? Brothers and sisters? Other family?
  • Where do you call home? What is your passport country? What countries have you lived in?
  • Describe how you learned to ride a bike. What have you learned about motion from riding a bike? How, for example, do you think a bicycle stays upright while moving? What have you learned about learning? If you do not know how to ride a bike, what do you think is necessary for you to learn?
  • (See photo above) Which is a better first step, do you think, for learning to ride a bike: training wheels or a pedal-less bike (see picture in the heading)? Why do you think so?

Turn your paper in. You will be asked to share.

Let’s make name “plates” next. Please fold an index card longways. Then on an outer facing side with the fold on top, print your name clearly. Make it dark and as large as possible. See picture.

IMG_0050

 

 

Next take the notebook you are given and write your name on the first page along with your period and Science 7. Also label the front of the notebook with masking tape (see picture below). Bring the notebook to EVERY class. We will discuss how to keep your notebook up-to-date later this week. (btw, you will also be keeping a digital science notebook using google drive.)

IMG_0052

Notebook entry 1.

First day Science 7. 8 August 2017

Review the guidelines for the digital science notebook: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/science-7/digital-science-notebook-science-7/

  1. Include notes on any important information. Class blog: < rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in >. Syllabus. Classroom procedures. Notebook.
  2. What we did?
  3. What we saw?
  4. What we talked about?
  5. What you think and wonder?
  6. A sketch to help you remember and think.
  7. A photo to help you remember and think.
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26 May Science 8 Summer, next year, Premier episode Years of Living Dangerously

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