18 April Science 8 Preparing/Practicing for the Human Impact Project sessions

Take a mindful moment. Think of the earth. See these big cats who live in India. Imagine how they resist extinction caused by human activity. What does it take to survive as an individual? As a species? As an ecosystem? Could this poem by John Donne be extended to all living things?

No man is an island,
Entire of itself.
Each is a piece of the continent,
A part of the main.
If a clod be washed away by the sea,
Europe is the less.
As well as if a promontory were.
As well as if a manor of thine own
Or of thine friend’s were.
Each man’s death diminishes me,
For I am involved in mankind.
Therefore, send not to know
For whom the bell tolls,
It tolls for thee.

 

Plan how you will spend this period.

Look at the guidelines from the past  classes:

http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2019/04/10/10-april-science-8-continued-planning-for-human-impact-project-session/

http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2019/04/08/8-april-science-8-planning-for-your-human-impact-session/

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1IqgoKngBjNjikNrScutHrBwOCSnRmY_G_KoFjX1fz78/edit?usp=sharing

Make sure the following are uploaded and clearly labeled in your DSN–even if they are in progress. Show these today:

  • Annotated bibliography (correctly following the format)
  • Presentation
  • Activity plan (check with Ms. Kaur if you need any materials–must be safe)
  • Discussion plan
  • Accurate statement of your progress as of 12 April.

 

  • If you feel you are finished with plans, practice/rehearse the activity, the discussion, and the presentation.
  • Check your times.
  • Make sure your activity works as you have planned–you need to troubleshoot and adjust.
  • Practice the discussion with a small group of classmates.
  • Reciprocate the favor when they need you.
  • Time your presentation.
  • Carefully consider questions and prompts.
  • Interview classmates and other 8th graders as part of your planning to get a sense of what questions and ideas which are most thought-provoking.

Stay on task. Stay focused. Be excited and enthusiastic about sharing your topic. Make good progress. Pay attention to the schedule. Ask whenever you have questions.

Period 5

  • 23/2 Yu Min        Ada
  • 25/4 Reem           HyunJin
  • 29/6 Sophie         Myra 
  • 1/8 Santino          Anagha
  • 3/2 Reyha             SeungHyeon 
  • 7/4 Lewis              Rotem
  • 9/6 SeungMin     Eva 
  • 13/8 Sulaimaan  Eliade
  • 15/2 Shaked         Dowoo

Period 7

  • 29/6 Caden                    Joshua
  • 1/8 Iris                           Marin
  • 3/2 Min-ha                   Faris
  • 7/4 Jeh                          Afreen
  • 9/6 Felix .                       Chihaya
  • 13/8 Willem
  • 15/2 Alanound               HanGyeol

Period 8

  • 1/8 Sumair            Rahul
  • 3/2 Aadi                 Mira
  • 7/4 Varun             Michal
  • 9/6 Isabella          Jigme
  • 13/8 Armaan       Yash
  • 15/2 Liam              Shiv

Review this with regard to reliability of your sources: https://www.ted.com/talks/julie_scelfo_how_do_humans_make_true_meaning_apr_2019

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17 April Science 7 Can simulations and games help us understand evolution/natural selection?

Mindful moment: “Endless forms most beautiful”

*****

Read today’s blog carefully. Have your questions ready.

Be sure that all these are properly uploaded, labelled, and shared in your DSN.

Biodiversity folder:

  • Your Tree Diversity Summative.
  • Your Focused Field Study Summative conducted in the schoolyard (45 minute minimum observation)

Natural Selection / Evolution folder:

  • Your creative response to the Friday field trip to see Monkeys and Dog.
  • Your group work on the concluding paragraph to Darwin’s Origin of Species.
  • Class DSN entries since the Friday field trip. (Notes on the Mysterious Origin of Corn). Did you remember the article we read early in the semester on the origin of the tomato? Go back and review your notes from that article. How does it relate to the story of corn?

*****

Look at some of the links and resources from last year’s class: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2018/04/24/24-april-science-7-simulations-and-natural-selectionevolution/

Note: Our final summative project is based on a simulation–see below–AND–see the references on simulation on the link above.

*****

Because the weather is nice today, we will go outside to investigate aspects of evolution / natural selection through simulations / games.

Oh Deer! (looks at population dynamics and resources)–be sure to record the questions we ask as we play the game/conduct the simulation.

Bat-Moth (looks at predator-prey relationships)–be sure to record the questions we ask as we play the game/conduct the simulation.

We will keep data for you to analyze and reflect upon.

What is an analogy? What is a model? What is a simulation? What is a game? (metaphors and similes are closed related to analogies.) It is very interesting that simulations and games have played a role in the way scientists have investigated evolution by natural selection (as well as other types of selection). How do you think that works? Think of the source in an analogy and the target. Analogies can enlighten, but they can also confuse. How do analogies succeed? When do they fail? What is important in using analogies, models, simulations, and games in order to investigate real phenomena?

Always go back to the concluding paragraph of Origin of Species to test your understanding of natural selection.

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15 April Science 7 The Origin of Species–Natural Selection and Artificial Selection/Domestication

Mindful moment: What first comes to your mind when you think of the phrase “living thing?” Spend a few moments examining your thought. What do you notice? What interests you? What are you curious about?

  • * * * *

Now that we have spent some time considering and examining the diversity of certain groups of living things (like campus trees) and the way living things exist and behave in the environment, let’s turn our attention to the explanations that scientists have developed to account for the diversity of forms and behaviors exhibited by all the living things in the world. Two important scientists who proposed foundational ideas in the grand scientific explanation are Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace. Below you will see a beautifully written summation by Darwin that captures his essential argument.

What do you see in the picture below?

In groups:

  • (Period 3)
  • A. Gisele, Caelan, Hyun Joon
  • B. Jake, YeJi, MinJun
  • C. Natasha, Aditya, SeungYi
  • D. Kyra, Seojin, Jaein
  • (Period 4)
  • Arjun, Soraia, Alexander
  • Amina, Kunal, Elena
  • Helena, Adyant, Taiki
  • Max, Rina, Samika
  • Yunji, Theresa, Chanmin

Analyze the following passage. Note your questions. Select examples. Summarize your ideas and your group’s ideas. Compose a group essay summarizing your interpretation, your thoughts, and your questions. Make sure there is a copy of this essay in each group member’s DSN. Share your group’s thinking with the full class.

(The passage is from the 1st edition of Origin of Species: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/1228/1228-h/1228-h.htm )

1. It is interesting to contemplate an entangled bank, clothed with many plants of many kinds, with birds singing on the bushes, with various insects flitting about, and with worms crawling through the damp earth, and to reflect that these elaborately constructed forms, so different from each other, and dependent on each other in so complex a manner, have all been produced by laws acting around us.

2. These laws, taken in the largest sense, being Growth with Reproduction; Inheritance which is almost implied by reproduction; Variability from the indirect and direct action of the external conditions of life, and from use and disuse; a Ratio of Increase so high as to lead to a Struggle for Life, and as a consequence to Natural Selection, entailing Divergence of Character and the Extinction of less-improved forms.

3. Thus, from the war of nature, from famine and death, the most exalted object which we are capable of conceiving, namely, the production of the higher animals, directly follows.

4. There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2000/oct/22/booksnews.peopleinscience

As time permits, watch the following video: Popped Secret: The Mysterious Origin of Corn

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=3&v=mBuYUb_mFXA

Take notes and answer the following in your DSN:

What is the mystery? What explanations did scientists consider and test? What evidence was gathered and what role does each piece of evidence play in explaining the origin of corn? How might domestication compare to evolution by natural selection?

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12 & 16 April Science 8 Make progress on your human impact plans

Take a mindful moment.

Plan how you will spend this period.

Look at the guidelines from the past two classes:

http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2019/04/10/10-april-science-8-continued-planning-for-human-impact-project-session/

http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/2019/04/08/8-april-science-8-planning-for-your-human-impact-session/

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1IqgoKngBjNjikNrScutHrBwOCSnRmY_G_KoFjX1fz78/edit?usp=sharing

Make sure the following are uploaded and clearly labeled in your DSN–even if they are in progress:

  • Annotated bibliography (correctly following the format)
  • Presentation
  • Activity plan (check with Ms. Kaur if you need any materials–must be safe)
  • Discussion plan
  • Accurate statement of your progress as of 12 April.
  • Show the substitute that you have these items clearly labeled in your DSN.
  • If you feel you are finished with plans, practice/rehearse the activity, the discussion, and the presentation. Check your times. Make sure your activity works as you have planned–you need to troubleshoot and adjust. Practice the discussion with a small group of classmates. Reciprocate the favor when they need you. Time your presentation. Carefully consider questions and prompts. Interview classmates and other 8th graders as part of your planning to get a sense of what questions and ideas which are most thought-provoking.

Stay on task. Stay focused. Be excited and enthusiastic about sharing your topic. Make good progress. Pay attention to the schedule. Send any questions you have to < rfrazier@aes.ac.in >. I may not have internet for a few days, but I will get back to you when I do.

Period 5

  • 23/2 Yu Min        Ada
  • 25/4 Reem           HyunJin
  • 29/6 Sophie         Myra 
  • 1/8 Santino          Anagha
  • 3/2 Reyha             SeungHyeon 
  • 7/4 Lewis              Rotem
  • 9/6 SeungMin     Eva 
  • 13/8 Sulaimaan  Eliade
  • 15/2 Shaked         Dowoo

Period 7

  • 29/6 Caden                    Joshua
  • 1/8 Iris                           Marin
  • 3/2 Min-ha                   Faris
  • 7/4 Jeh                          Afreen
  • 9/6 Felix .                       Chihaya
  • 13/8 Willem
  • 15/2 Alanound               HanGyeol

Period 8

  • 1/8 Sumair            Rahul
  • 3/2 Aadi                 Mira
  • 7/4 Varun             Michal
  • 9/6 Isabella          Jigme
  • 13/8 Armaan       Yash
  • 15/2 Liam              Shiv

 

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11 April Science 7 Creative Response to our Monkey, Dog, Bird, etc. field trip

Mindful moment:

When we visited Bhagwan Mahavir Vanasthali park, we had a reading of “Macaques in the Sky”

You can find the poem toward the end of the transcript from this interview: https://billmoyers.com/content/here-in-the-mind-daisy-zamora-and-gary-snyder/

I have been taking an online course: Poetry in America: Earth, Sky, Sea. Many examples connect poetry and science. See the website: https://www.poetryinamerica.org/

Here is an episode that includes E.O. Wilson who coined the term Biodiversity. https://www.poetryinamerica.org/episode/the-gray-heron/

For today:

Chose your own way to respond creatively to your observations, thoughts, reflections, questions from our experience in the park.

A few pictures from the field trip: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1X3gghkqZVUMcEqat8G5N0kWeSiTL9d8o?usp=sharing

Write a poem or a richly described piece of creative non-fiction; Write a song if you are musical with melody, harmony, and lyrics; Make a black and white line drawing on good paper; Make a painting; Make a drawing with color; Write a play; Choreograph a dance; Create a sculpture; Propose some other medium.

While you think about your response, watch this video about Macaques in Sri Lanka https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VY4BwGiMPdc&t=151s 

The scientist featured has one of the longest-running research projects on monkeys. Read about him here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolf_Dittus

Disney pictures made a feature length movie about these monkeys: Monkey Kingdom https://nature.disney.com/monkey-kingdom

Have you seen it?

There was even play written about these monkeys: https://www.webpages.uidaho.edu/jgw/serendib.htm

A review (some of the reviews were positive; some not): http://newtheatercorps.blogspot.com/2007/03/serendib.html

Explore primates in art: http://pin.primate.wisc.edu/av/art/index.html

And this: https://www.interaliamag.org/articles/entangling-art-biology-knot-three-nonhuman-kingdoms-making-art-primates-microbes/

What about music? http://musiccognition.blogspot.com/2013/12/differences-in-rhythm-perception.html

and https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/02/140216-sea-lion-parrot-music-animal-behavior-science/

and https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/do-animals-have-rhythm-180951865/

Music and birdsong: https://www.theguardian.com/music/2003/apr/11/classicalmusicandopera.artsfeatures

Find out about composers who were inspired by birdsong–take Messiaen for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9QdgUJss9BU

Ramayana (with Monkey god) in Cambodia https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwhh_jFm9LU

Finish, share, display your creative work. Have fun!!!

 

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10 April Science 8 Continued planning for Human Impact project / session

Mindful moment.

Continue building annotated bibliography. Ask if you have questions.

Finish advertisement and put up on bulletin board.

Plan and compose presentation.

  • Essential concepts and facts.
  • Clear statement of the issues/problems/dilemmas.
  • Relation to the idea that we are now in the Anthropocene.
  • Significance with regard to environmental health. Global? Local?
  • History.
  • Solutions that have been tried.
  • Proposed solutions.

Plan and draft written version for activity.

Materials? Instructions? Arrangement of space? Grouping? Objectives? Management concerns? Expected responses from participants and your follow-up responses.

Plan and draft written version for discussion.

Initial instructions / prompts / directives? Expected response(s) and follow-ups? Methods for distributing and facilitating participation? Methods for listening and responding and redirecting? Expected flow of discussion–second level prompts and questions? Methods for clarifying, containing, and moving discussion to next point? Methods for balancing a strict direction for the discussion and one that flows from participants’ ideas? Methods for summarizing, drawing conclusions, reflecting?

New references:

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9 April Science 7 Work on Report for Focused Field Study–Nature in the Schoolyard

Mindful moment. Bring up an image from the field trip on Friday. Consider that image in your private thoughts for a moment.

  • Next write down a description.
  • Then make a sketch.
  • Let’s share.

Today–work on the report for your focused field study–when you observed nature in the schoolyard Monday of last week.

Follow this format — use the headings in your report. Be sure to include your name and period. This is due at the beginning of the next class. Uploaded to your DSN AND a paper copy. No printing during class. :

Introduction.

Explain what you chose to observe. Explain your choice. What did you think you might see? Why? What did you already know about your object(s) of study.

Background research information.

Gather some information from reliable sources related to what you chose to observe. Be sure to cite your sources in a reference list at the end of your report.

Methods.

How did you go about making your observations. Explain what you did.

Results.

What did you observe? Organize your results and present them with labels and explanations where needed.

Analysis.

What did you notice from your observations? What things did you see that you have not ever seen before? What are some explanations you think might account for what you have seen. What questions have come to mind? If you had more time, how would you go about investigating your questions? What do you think you would find? Explain your reasoning.

Conclusion

Write a concise summary of what you found and what questions related to your study that you think need to be addressed next.

Reference list:

Include full bibliographic information.

Comment/Reflection

Comment on your experience, new things that you have noticed, new thoughts about the world of living things.

If you finish your report during today’s (Tuesday’s) class, you should show it to me. Then you may print it and turn it in.

******

Prepare for Thursday.

You will be asked to respond in a creative way in class to your observations and experience watching the monkeys. Think about the poem you heard “Macaques in the Sky” by Gary Snyder.

A few pictures from the field trip: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1X3gghkqZVUMcEqat8G5N0kWeSiTL9d8o?usp=sharing

Can you figure out where we were on the field trip? You can toggle between aerial photo and map and you can zoom in and out. Find AES. Look at the extent of the Central Ridge Forest. Notice as much as you can about the environment:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Bhagwan+Mahavir+Vanasthali+Park,+Central+Ridge+Reserve+Forest,+New+Delhi,+Delhi+110021/@28.6028036,77.17737,372m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x390d1d440560305f:0x7d6ebe666d2d0f03!8m2!3d28.6027233!4d77.1776331

Review the materials about Monkeys and Dogs.

Ethology, Ecology, Evolution of Monkeys and Dogs at the park

On Friday we will take a field trip during class to a park near the school. The park is carved out of the Central Ridge Forest.  (See this old pamphlet: https://archive.org/details/DelhiRidge)

Increase your knowledge of dog and monkey behavior.

  1. Practice observation of behaviors with the various video clips. Develop “search images” through careful observation. The value of video is that you can “rewind and replay.”
  2. Consider how an organism’s behavior enables it to live and reproduce in an environment–the environment for both of our animals of study include physical, biological, and social aspects.
  3. Think about how an organism’s behavior, body, and environment (at all scales) interact and how this interaction affects how successfully the organism reproduces and how successfully the offspring reproduce.

It is fun to look at scientific papers about things we study in Science 7. See this:  http://www.ipublishing.co.in/ijesarticles/thirteen/articles/volthree/EIJES31128.pdf

and this: https://www.nature.com/articles/srep32014

See if you can find other articles about monkeys and stray/street dogs in India.

See this list of Macaque behaviors: https://nc3rs.org.uk/macaques/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Ethogram-for-general-behavioural-monitoring-Caralyn-Kemp.pdf

See this list of Canid (dog family) behaviors: http://rfrazier.msblogs.aes.ac.in/files/2017/04/pred_etho_canid1.pdf

Practice your observation skills with the following video clips. (You may use headphones for the videos.)

Monkeys: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ay-7LNMab40

Dogs: https://www.youtube.com/user/PatriciaMcConnell/videos

Watch during class and as homework before Friday’s trip:

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8 April Science 8 Planning for your human impact session

Take a mindful moment. Breathe. Reflect. Think about nothing. Choose what you would like to do in a quiet moment. Just be with yourself.

Questions.

*****

Today:

Finish/place on bulletin board the advertisement of your growing expertise.

Show Dr. F your progress as you are called.

As this planning stage of the project gives you and your classmates time to work individually, PLEASE do not distract others. Change seats if you cannot resist the temptation to use your time in chit chat rather than reading, thinking, planning. Use your time well. ASK if you have questions. ASK if you need help. You may certainly get up and stretch, change which part of the project you are working on, leave the room for the bathroom or a drink according to the procedure we have used all year.

Document all your  research and planning in your DSN–your annotated bibliography should be in your DSN.

Be sure to gain more and more expertise as you research your topic. Document that research in your annotated bibliography. You want 15 sources. Majority should be scientific and reliable. Some can come from newspapers and other media. Be wary of blogs that are not written by knowledgable people. You can also cite interviews with experts.

Plan your presentation (no more than 5 minutes):

  • What are the main points–big ideas?
  • What are some defining examples / cases?
  • What are the challenges and issues in addressing the problems associated with your topic?
  • What are the things that might be difficult to understand?
  • What is the science related to your topic?
  • What solutions and actions are being considered?

Plan your discussion (this plan should be written):

  • How will you initiate the discussion?
  • What prompts will you use?
  • What questions will you pose?
  • How will you follow-up on a participant’s response to a question you pose?
  • How will you keep the discussion going?
  • How will you make sure there is wide participation?
  • How will you seek clarification of responses?
  • How will you redirect questions and comments from one participant to another?
  • How will you keep track of the ideas raised during the discussion so that you can summarize the discussion at the end of your time?
  • How will you avoid putting yourself in the position of trying to answer questions you do not know the answer to?
  • How will you keep the discussion on track while encouraging participants to express their ideas and pose their questions?

Plan your activity:

  • How is your activity related to the topic and the scientific aspects of the topic?
  • Describe the expected experience, thoughts, and questions your participant might have as a result of engaging in your activity?
  • How do you want your activity to fit into your session? What purpose do you see it having with respect to your entire session?
  • What materials will you need?
  • How much set-up time will you need? (Important: Do not take more than 1 minute of your 30 minutes for set-up. This means have everything ready to go before your session begins.)
  • How long will your activity take? (You will need to practice in order to assess accurately the time you will need.) (You will need to troubleshoot your activities to reveal any potential difficulties.)
  • What instructions will you give?
  • What feedback do you anticipate giving?
  • How will you summarize the results of the activity?
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5 April Science 7

Field trip to park to see monkeys. Pictures to come.

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4 April Science 8 Human Impact Project work

Mindful moment.

Questions.

  • * ** * *

Start your advertisement poster (see board).

Complete your annotated bibliography 15 sources.

Start planning your session.

Progress check–see schedule.

You have 30 minutes. No more than 5 minutes should be based on your giving information or directions.

The goal is to recruit your classmates into the topic you have investigated through activity and discussion. Your role is to bring your peers into the conversation about your topic. You will need to think carefully about what the basic ideas and questions are, what will be challenging for your peers to comprehend, and what will generate interest, curiosity, concern and what will lead to participation.

ACTIVITY Planning

  1. What activity should you try (only 10-15 minutes so it cannot be too involved)
  2. How can it include interaction with real phenomena relevant to your topic?
  3. You do not need to try to encompass the entire topic through a single, short activity.
  4. The activity could be a starting point, a conclusion, and perhaps even a transition.
  5. The activity should be directly concerned with scientific ideas associated with your topic.
  6. Other.

DISCUSSION Planning

  1. How will you encourage participation?
  2. Are there some ways to initiate the discussion that will get your peers talking that are likely to work better than other ways?
  3. What are the essential question?
  4. What are the questions / prompts that will most likely elicit concern and caring from your peers?
  5. What patterns of discourse seem to encourage wider discussion than others?
  6. How will you follow up on comments? How will you manage the discussion? How will you ensure widespread participation?
  7. One of your roles will be to summarize the discussion at the end, what is the best way for you to do that.
  8. Other.

PRESENTATION planning

  1. What is essential, thought-provoking, inviting?
  2. What information will help initiate and sustain the group discussion during your session?
  3. What will pique interest and curiosity and concern?
  4. What are the difficult concepts–can they be presented in an understandable and accurate way?
  5. Where in your session is the best place for you to make the expository part of the presentation?
  6. Other.

We will begin review of your work 20 minutes into the class. We will go by the schedule. Will mark your progress under Human Impact Check 1 in power school.

Period 5

  • 23/2 Yu Min        Ada
  • 25/4 Reem           HyunJin
  • 29/6 Sophie         Myra 
  • 1/8 Santino          Anagha
  • 3/2 Reyha             SeungHyeon 
  • 7/4 Lewis              Rotem
  • 9/6 SeungMin     Eva 
  • 13/8 Sulaimaan  Eliade
  • 15/2 Shaked         Dowoo

Period 7

  • 29/6 Caden                    Joshua
  • 1/8 Iris                           Marin
  • 3/2 Min-ha                   Faris
  • 7/4 Jeh                          Afreen
  • 9/6 Felix .                       Chihaya
  • 13/8 Willem
  • 15/2 Alanound               HanGyeol

Period 8

  • 1/8 Sumair            Rahul
  • 3/2 Aadi                 Mira
  • 7/4 Varun             Michal
  • 9/6 Isabella          Jigme
  • 13/8 Armaan       Yash
  • 15/2 Liam              Shiv

More Human Impact resources:

Restoring natural forests is the best way to remove atmospheric carbon

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01026-8

Climate change and agriculture

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/mar/05/italy-may-depend-on-olive-imports-from-april-scientist-says

While this article may seem pretty “scientific,” it does illustrate the idea that everything is connected. Human impact often goes further than we even imagine.
 
Amphibian fungal panzootic causes catastrophic and ongoing loss of biodiversity

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/363/6434/1459

Elephants and habitat loss

ttps://thewire.in/environment/asian-elephants-may-lose-up-to-half-their-habitats-by-the-centurys-end

Mosquito-borne diseases and climate change

If you run into an article which requires payment, ask Mrs. Hoiseth if you can access through school’s journal databases.

Rewilding

https://www.hindustantimes.com/delhi-news/plans-to-introduce-wildlife-in-tilpath/story-p2Z4toVykAKMaSXLU32PxN.html?fbclid=IwAR3TV_O-lVr_CXHtjWDtF5Prypgl27rzohzaYlurqGyd2J5gLqm4eNSagu0

Toxic air will shorten children’s lives by 20 months

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/apr/03/toxic-air-will-shorten-childrens-lives-by-20-months-study-reveals

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