22 Feb. Science 8 Transpiration; Blocking sunlight and starch; Interpreting results

Meet at study site to collect leaves/data. Return to lab. Follow safety guidelines.

Today we will go and gather the results from the leaf experiments set up during last class.

First, carefully remove the plastic bag that was covering the leaf. Do not spill any water. Very carefully measure the water in ml. (Read the cylinder carefully. You might want to empty the bag into a beaker and then pour the water from the beaker into the cylinder. If your bag did not collect any water, the most likely reason is that the bag was not sufficiently closed. Transpiration involves evaporation at the leaf surface. You might imagine it is a complicated process for water to move into the roots and up the plant into the leaves. Some of the water is used for photosynthesis. The water in the plant also gives it turgor and dissolves various molecules that are transported in the plant. There is no pump for this circulation (like a heart in animals) but rather a complex interaction of physical processes “managed” by the plant. To get a “taste” of the coordination of processes, browse the article/link below:

Lay the leaf that was in the bag flat on some 1 cm x 1 cm graph paper. Trace the outline. Estimate the surface area. (Both partners estimate and then compare. You should be close to each other.)

Enter the data in this spreadsheet. Let me know when you want to enter the data and I will add you to the list of those who can edit. When all data has been entered, you will be notified. You should then make a scatter plot with volume of transpired water on the vertical (y-) axis and surface area of leaf on the horizontal (x-) axis. Be sure to title graph, label axis with variable and unit, choose convenient, consistent scales that includes all the data and covers 1/2 the graph paper.

https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/1TML3i5R6CyoSmAgsjB4w7yeEwUdyL7prE-CqF6KGraw/edit?usp=sharing

Next remove the leaves that were covered with black paper. We will return to the room and de-color the leaves.

Use eye protection. Take care with the hot ethanol and hot water. Avoid inhaling the fumes (we will have the exhaust fans on.) Avoid contact with skin. No flame. Pour the used ethanol in the designated container.

Procedure explained and demonstrated in class.

  • Collect covered leaves. Remember which leaf was cover with which design.
  • Remove paper cover on leaves.
  • Place leaves in hot water for 5 minutes.
  • Place boiled leaf in a container of ethanol and place the container in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes.

 

 

 

 

 

  • Place a de-colored leaf in a container and add iodine as a starch indicator.
  • How do you interpret the results?
  • Describe and take pictures of your leaf. Do this very soon after adding the iodine as the leaves will eventually dry out and curl and you may not get a clear picture.
  • See these notebook entries from former Science 8 students:
  • 20kbardos.5.Feb.StarchExperiment
  • 20mkataoka.Starch.Feb5
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21 Feb. Finish tree survey. Summative (Field study #1) announced with due date.

Sci 7 17-18  Biodiversity Survey—Assessment Project (due beginning of class  5 March in print copy AND correctly labeled and uploaded in your DSN).

Criteria and standards

  1. Biodiversity Survey
  2. Students design and carry out a biodiversity survey in the schoolyard or in the neighborhood.
  3. Data is collected and analyzed.
  4. Analysis is made and conclusions drawn with respect to structures, behaviors, successful reproduction and /or population.
  5. Presentation of survey and analysis in standard or alternative report format decided by individual students in consultation with teacher.
  6. Standards
  • SEP
  • Planning and carrying out investigations
  • Analyzing and interpreting data
  • CC
  • Structure and function
  • DCI
  • Growth, development, and reproduction of organisms
  • Natural selection and adaptations

Tree Biodiversity Summative (Field Study #1) 2018

Due: March 5 & 6 at the start of class.

The summative will have two parts:

Part 1 – Partner Tree book page

Design a page for a book on the trees of the campus(8.5”x11” paper), that could be printed, on your partner tree. Font = Calibri 12. No other unusual formatting. It should include:

  • Scientific, common and local names of the tree
  • Location of your tree on campus
  • Location of other individuals of your species on campus
  • Total number of individuals on campus
  • Description of key features of your partner tree (height/diameter, leaf shape/size, bark, fruit, flowers etc.)
  • Pictures of your tree, its flowers, fruits, bark and leaves over the course of the year and examples of other trees
  • What the tree is used for. Is it eaten by people? Animals? Used as a medicine or for houses? Do animals nest in it? Is it poisonous?
  • Is it native or introduced?
  • References must be cited

Here is an example:

Partner Tree page mockup

Submit your book page as a Google doc in your DSN and in paper copy. Font = Calibri 11. Include name, period, date, tree names on a separate title page. This part will be a 2 page document.

Part 2 – Tree Biodiversity Analysis

Dr. Frazier’s 2017-2018 school year Tree Survey–Periods 1 and 3:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1LPvZ8c3A_Fv15uiloutgkazEqC3xjctsdLhT95rcKzk/edit?usp=sharing

You may check the following surveys for comparison to yours:

Using the database generated by your class and those generated by the other classes, complete the following in complete sentences:

  1. How many species of trees are on campus? What is the total number of individual trees on campus? What is the diversity index (#species/#trees) for the campus? For each area of the campus?
  2. How many plant families are represented by the trees on campus? What is the most abundant plant family? What is most widely distributed species? Which genus is most abundant? Which species is most abundant? Which species are represented by a single specimen? Of the single specimens which would be considered the rarest (need to consult reference for this question)?
  3. What is the predominant botanical origin of campus trees? (Native? Asian? Tropical America?) What is the proportion of campus trees that are native (to Aravalli, India, Asia)? How many species would be considered invasive? Which trees appear to have been established naturally (not planted on purpose by humans)? Just using native trees (to India), what is the diversity index for the school and for each area. Just using foreign or exotic species, what is the diversity index for the school and for each area? What related implications for the campus environment do you see? Be sure to consider “environment” from a wide point of view (natural, social, aesthetic, educational, etc.).
  4. Which 5 trees are the largest (girth @ 1.5m)? Are they from the same species or the same family? Are they in the same zone of the campus or different zones?
  5. Comment on the (scientific) confidence you have in the survey results? What variation do you see across the different

Pick one of the following three questions to answer. Use complete sentences.

  • A. Which trees are currently flowering/fruiting (February 24 -March 9)? Describe the trees, their flowers / fruits? How many other specimens of the same species are also flowering/fruiting? What patterns, if any, do you notice or suspect? Take time for any flowering trees to note insects or birds visiting the flowers. Which animal species visits which tree species? Try to decide if the animal is a pollinator.
  • B. Which trees attract the greatest number of birds? Feeding? Nesting? Roosting?
  • C. Which trees have cultural importance? Which trees have legends, myths, stories in which they have a major role or just even appear? Explain your answers. Find out how 10 species got their names (scientific, common English, local—where possible).

Submit the analysis as a Google doc uploaded and labeled correctly in your DSN AND in print. Be sure your name, period, and date appear on the document.

Preventing Plant Blindness (from Wandersee and Schussler):

Definition of Plant Blindness

  • (a) the inability to see or notice the plants in one’s environment;
  • (b) the inability to recognize the importance of plants in the biosphere and in human affairs;
  • (c) the inability to appreciate the aesthetic and unique biological features of the life forms that belong to the Plant Kingdom; and
  • (d) the misguided anthropocentric ranking of plants as inferior to animals and thus, as unworthy of consideration

Symptoms of Plant Blindness

  • (a) thinking that plants are merely the backdrop for animal life;
  • (b) failing to see, notice or focus attention on plants in one’s daily life;
  • (c) misunderstanding what plants need to stay alive;
  • (d) overlooking the importance of plants to one’s daily affairs;
  • (e) failing to distinguish the differing time scales of plant and animal activity;
  • (f) lacking hands-on experiences in growing, observing and identifying plants in one’s own geographic region;
  • (g) failing to explain the basic plant science underlying nearby plant communities- including plant growth, nutrition, reproduction, and relevant ecological considerations;
  • (h) lacking awareness that plants are central to a key bio- chemical cycle-the carbon cycle;
  • (i) being insensitive to the aesthetic qualities of plants and their structures-especially with respect to their adaptation, coevolution, color, dispersal, diversity, growth, pattern, reproduction, scent, size, sounds, spacing, strength, symmetry, tactility, taste and texture

https://www.princeton.edu/news/2013/02/04/video-feature-princeton-trees

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/26/opinion/sunday/cure-yourself-of-tree-blindness

html?_r=0https://naturewalk.yale.edu/trees

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Feb 20 Science 8 3 experiments; overcoming plant blindness; photosynthesis and human impact

Early parent conferences: 5-9 March before and after school. (Presenting at NSTA–type Frazier in keyword search under search events: http://www.nsta.org/conferences/schedule2.aspx?id=2018atl

Complete the items in bold

Be prepared for student-parent-teacher conference: Complete and up-to-date DSN. Carbon presentation–yours and others. Poster of van Helmont’s experiment and creative treatment of Ingenhousz’s experiments. Pic-collage of photomicrographs. Documentation of microscope observations. Human impact topic and annotated bibliography started. Hands-on work: fermentation, tasting a cracker, transpiration, sunlight and starch, bubbles and sunlight, chromatography of plant pigments. Understanding of claim of photosynthesis. Relation of claim to previous study–conservation of mass, molecular models, chemical reactions. Historical examples of evidence to support the claim. How does photosynthesis relate to the carbon cycle? How does human activity affect the carbon cycle? You and “plant blindness.” Your questions.

Let’s try these groups for the following experiments:

  • Period 8
  • Ronan, Natty, Tanush
  • Uvanka, Satvik, Keshav
  • Esther, Caroline, Will
  • Beatrice, Hyun Min, Vedaa
  • Jeong Hun, Amya, Kete
  • Arjun,Ho Seung, Anya
  • Fareed, Valentin
  • Period 5
  • Mehak, Asha, Augustine
  • Kiran Enoch Eduard
  • Noa Aarav G., Maya
  • Ha Young, Maanvi, Advay
  • Aarav C., Ben
  • Sophie, JaeHyung
  • Period 6
  • Nora,Aditya, Lingchen
  • Sufan, Hyeongjin, YiHyun
  • Giri, Minjae, Sasha
  • Gigi, JaeHyun, Suhani
  • Vikram, Juha, Ananya
  • Ayla, Vicky, Dana

Make sure your partner list is complete and up-to-date. Partners, projects, dates. How close are you to the goal of having worked successfully with every person in the class? Evidence?

Experiment 1:

Cover leaf/leaves with plastic bag. Close bag tightly around leaf/leaves but do not damage the plant. Use a length of string. Attach a section of notecard with names, period, date, and time written in pencil. Take pictures of your set-up–close-up and far–so you can find it in the next class.

Experiment 2:

Take a piece of black construction paper and fold over a leaf that gets full sun. Use paperclips to hold the paper in place. Do not damage the leaf. With another piece of black construction paper, cut out a simple design on one half. Fold this piece over another leaf so that the cut-out design is over the upper part of the leaf that is exposed to the sun. Secure with paper clips.

Experiment 3:

If we have a supply of fresh celery, we will cut a stalk and place it in a beaker/glass of water to which food coloring has been added. We will let the stalk sit in the water until the next class.

Write your thoughts about each experiment. What do you expect? Why? How do you think these experiments relate to the claim of photosynthesis?

See the following links about water in plants.

https://water.usgs.gov/edu/watercycleevapotranspiration.html

http://www.ictinternational.com/casestudies/physiology-of-water-absorption-and-transpiration/

And these from our previous class:

Find out what you can about plant cells: http://thebiologyprimer.com/cell/

It’s fun to think of the scale of things and how the accumulated effect of the actions of all the photosynthesizing plant cells in the world, impact the earth. Carbon, oxygen, and water cycles all are affected by photosynthesis. https://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/java/scienceopticsu/powersof10/

Photosynthesis for kids: http://photosynthesiseducation.com/photosynthesis-for-kids/

An animation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xeYNnzwpSE

Plants and new water animation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TWO9YzAvIDg

What is your understanding of the following article–how are photosynthesis, earth cycles, carbon cycle, radioactivity, human impact on the environment, and the onset of the Anthropocene involved
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-43113900

In case you wondered: Early evolution of photosynthesis http://www.plantphysiol.org/content/154/2/434

Read the following carefully. Write a reflective essay on your experience with plants and plant blindness. How does your experience studying photosynthesis relate?

Preventing Plant Blindness (from Wandersee and Schussler):

Definition of Plant Blindness

  • (a) the inability to see or notice the plants in one’s environment;
  • (b) the inability to recognize the importance of plants in the biosphere and in human affairs;
  • (c) the inability to appreciate the aesthetic and unique biological features of the life forms that belong to the Plant Kingdom; and
  • (d) the misguided anthropocentric ranking of plants as inferior to animals and thus, as unworthy of consideration

Symptoms of Plant Blindness

  • (a) thinking that plants are merely the backdrop for animal life;
  • (b) failing to see, notice or focus attention on plants in one’s daily life;
  • (c) misunderstanding what plants need to stay alive;
  • (d) overlooking the importance of plants to one’s daily affairs;
  • (e) failing to distinguish the differing time scales of plant and animal activity;
  • (f) lacking hands-on experiences in growing, observing and identifying plants in one’s own geographic region;
  • (g) failing to explain the basic plant science underlying nearby plant communities- including plant growth, nutrition, reproduction, and relevant ecological considerations;
  • (h) lacking awareness that plants are central to a key bio- chemical cycle-the carbon cycle;
  • (i) being insensitive to the aesthetic qualities of plants and their structures-especially with respect to their adaptation, coevolution, color, dispersal, diversity, growth, pattern, reproduction, scent, size, sounds, spacing, strength, symmetry, tactility, taste and texture
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19 Feb. Science 7 Finish tree survey; Finish partner tree research; Discuss summative

Early parent conferences: 5-9 before and after school. (Presenting at NSTA–type Frazier in keyword search under search events: http://www.nsta.org/conferences/schedule2.aspx?id=2018atl

Be prepared: Complete and up-to-date DSN. Partner Tree. Tree survey–Field study #1. Most interesting idea. Most challenging idea. Most interesting observation. Understanding of survey techniques. Understanding of search image acquisition. Understanding of classification and naming of living things. Understanding of Darwin’s basic ideas.

Each group check in with Dr. F

Finish tree survey

Campus Trees Science 7 Periods 1 and 3 Frazier 2017-2018

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1LPvZ8c3A_Fv15uiloutgkazEqC3xjctsdLhT95rcKzk/edit?usp=sharing

Finish partner tree research

  • A Partner Tree Prevents “Plant Blindness”Please acquire and organize the following information.
    • Scientific, common English and local names of the tree
    • Information on how the tree got its names
    • Location of your tree on campus–map and description
    • Location of other specimens of your species on campus
    • Total number of specimens of your tree species on campus
    • Description of key features of your partner tree (height/diameter, leaf shape/size, arrangement, branching pattern, bark, fruit, flowers,  etc.) Girth in cm at 1.5 meters above the ground OR just below where the trunk divides–give the height above the ground as well. Greatest spread of canopy in meters. Approximate area shaded by canopy (directly under the tree) in square meters.
    • Pictures of your tree, its flowers, fruits, bark and leaves over the course of the year and examples of other specimens of the same species,
    • Leaf rubbing showing venation
    • Bark rubbing
    • Line drawings showing various structures and details of your tree (specimen and/or species)
    • Use a stethoscope and “listen” to the tree. Describe any interesting sounds that come from the tree–not sounds from, say, scraping the stethoscope.
    • Tell a secret to your partner tree. You do not have to record this in your DSN. Record it in your “heart.”
    • What the tree is used for by humans? Furniture, medicine, fodder for livestock, ritual? What cultural or religious associations are there with the tree species? Dr. F may be able to give you a hint if you are stuck. Can you find a poem, story, novel, song, work of art associated with your tree species?
    • What associations does the tree have with other organisms? Is it eaten by animals (host plant for butterfly or moth larvae, for example)? Dens or nests. Pollinators? Parasites? Fungi? Bacteria?
    • How much oxygen would you estimate that your partner tree releases in a year? How could you / scientists make this estimate? How much carbon from carbon dioxide is taken up by your tree in a year? How could you / scientists make this estimate? How productive is your tree–if , for example, you could collect the fallen leaves every day for a month and get their dry weight, how much would you get–estimate–or make arrangements to do the experiment?
    • What particular importance does the tree species have for science?
    • Is it native or introduced? Native to the Delhi region? To India? To Asia? Introduced from where? If it was transferred, what can you find out about its introduction to India? If it is exotic (introduced), what is the extent of its invasiveness?
    • References must be cited–full bibliographic information. (Note: You must have permission to use any photos that are not your own.)

Discuss summative–2 parts: Page on partner tree in specified format (to be included in pamphlet on campus trees; Interpretive questions on database of campus trees. Can we start on WED?

View, read, review the following links. What do you learn? What is your reaction?

https://www.princeton.edu/news/2013/02/04/video-feature-princeton-trees

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/26/opinion/sunday/cure-yourself-of-tree-blindness.html?_r=0

https://naturewalk.yale.edu/trees

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16 Feb. Science 8 Microscopic examination of plant parts and tissue; Select a tree friend; See leaf anatomy; Sign up for climate connections; Procedures for experiments next week

Procedures for experiments next week. Sunlight and starch production. Transpiration. Movement of water in stems. Will form new groups on Tuesday.

Continue in your microscopic examination of plant material. Be sure to document your observations thoroughly in your DSN. Sketches, photos, descriptions, measurements, labels. Organize your observations. Pose questions and follow them up. Reflect on how the structures relate to the functions (processes of photosynthesis, for example).

Examination of plant material under the microscope.

The purpose is to examine and contemplate the cellular organization of living things. Because green plants carry out photosynthesis, we want to witness first hand the structures that are involved. Remember that photosynthesis takes place in the cells.

Find out what you can about plant cells: http://thebiologyprimer.com/cell/

It’s fun to think of the scale of things and how the accumulated effect of the actions of all the photosynthesizing plant cells in the world, impact the earth. Carbon, oxygen, and water cycles all are affected by photosynthesis. https://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/java/scienceopticsu/powersof10/

Photosynthesis for kids: http://photosynthesiseducation.com/photosynthesis-for-kids/

An animation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xeYNnzwpSE

Plants and new water animation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TWO9YzAvIDg

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15 February Science 7 Tree Survey

Continue gathering data in your zone for the AES Campus Tree Survey (2017-2018)

Reflect on how you have acquired “search images” for the trees in your area. Write about this process of learning in your DSN. How do you imagine learning to recognize/notice something new takes place?. Test one another on being able to recognize the different species of tree in your zone.

Try to finish gathering information today.

  1. Present Dr. F with a number for the different species in your area.
  2. Get the names of the species. Dr. F can supply at least one of the names: Local, Common English, and/or Scientific.
  3. Realize that there there can be debate among scientists about classification and names. Remember the video episode we watched on the Confusion of Names about the history of classification and nomenclature: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cVDpdmlpZKw
  4. See these links for the discussion/debate among botanists about the grouping and naming of “acacias”: https://christiankull.net/2011/05/10/the-acacia-name-change-%E2%80%93-botany-and-emotion/
  5. And http://worldwidewattle.com/infogallery/nameissue/
  6. Also https://www.dailyo.in/variety/taxanomic-vandalism-india-species-classification-plant-nomenclature/story/1/22319.html
  7. Count the number of individuals belonging to each species.
  8. Mark locations as accurately as you can (without surveying–you may use pacing and “eyeball” angles to locate the trees) on a sketch map. Use the projection of a map to draw an accurate outline of your area.
  9. Enter the appropriate data in the spreadsheet for the trees in your zone.
  10. Double-check your species list, your counts, your measurements, your information.

Organize and completely share your data within your survey group. Select 2 contact persons from your group to represent progress and to keep group on task. These two will also have editing privileges when you are ready to enter your data in the spreadsheet: Campus Trees Science 7 Periods 1 and 3 Frazier 2017-2018

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1LPvZ8c3A_Fv15uiloutgkazEqC3xjctsdLhT95rcKzk/edit?usp=sharing

Sign up to receive weekly updates: https://www.yaleclimateconnections.org/

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14 Feb. Science 8 Your questions; microscopic examination of plant parts, plant tissues, plant cells, stomata, chloroplasts, etc.

Your questions:

A selection of those posed from your classmates–periods 5,6,8

Discuss and share your thoughts.

Examination of plant material under the microscope.

The purpose is to examine and contemplate the cellular organization of living things. Because green plants carry out photosynthesis, we want to witness first hand the structures that are involved. Remember that photosynthesis takes place in the cells.

Find out what you can about plant cells: http://thebiologyprimer.com/cell/

It’s fun to think of the scale of things and how the accumulated effect of the actions of all the photosynthesizing plant cells in the world, impact the earth. Carbon, oxygen, and water cycles all are affected by photosynthesis. https://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/java/scienceopticsu/powersof10/

Taking a sample and making a slide. Directions and demonstration in class.

Work carefully and neatly. Clean up as you go. Return supplies to dispensing area clean and dry.

Take care with sharp tools.

Take care with microscopes. Do not use the highest power unless checked by Dr. F.

Keep water and plant material off the microscope. Do not touch the lenses.

Things to try:

  • Peel from section of onion bulb.
  • Peel from leaf–top and bottom.
  • Cross section.
  • Longitudinal section.
  • Squash–onion root tip.
  • Mung bean sprout–root tip.
  • Look at a section of your leaf–top and bottom. Then you may try to make a peel.

 

Photomicrographs (iphone) above made from leaf peel of Tradescandia this morning in just a few minutes. You can make out stomata and the cell structure of the leaf surface.

Make sketches to show what you see AND the orientation of the sample from the source.

Try to take photos. These should be labelled. If you get a good set, make a pic-collage with captions.

Purple tradescantia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tradescantia_pallida)

  • Onion
  • Tradescantia
  • Lily
  • Your “tree”
  • Basil
  • Tomato
  • Other–if you don’t know the name–sketch, photo, and describe

 

 

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13 Feb Science 7 Tree Survey

Happy Darwin Day (12 Feb)!!! See the HHMI Lizard Collection: http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/lizards

Continue gathering data in your zone for the AES Campus Tree Survey (2017-2018)

Organize and completely share your data within your survey group. Select 2 contact persons from your group to represent progress and to keep group on task. These two will also have editing privileges when you are ready to enter your data in the spreadsheet: Campus Trees Science 7 Periods 1 and 3 Frazier 2017-2018

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1LPvZ8c3A_Fv15uiloutgkazEqC3xjctsdLhT95rcKzk/edit?usp=sharing

Sign up to receive weekly updates: https://www.yaleclimateconnections.org/

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12 Feb. Science 8 Finishing the video history

Next class–bring a leaf from the tree you have selected. We will be doing microscopic examination of leaves and other plant parts/tissues.

Today we will finish Photosynthesis from Botany: A Blooming History

Your task will be to link the experimental results to various parts of the simplified claim of photosynthesis. (This will be the basis of the summative assessment on the carbon cycle–emphasis on linking evidence to the claim of photosynthesis.)

(Note that the narrator does not provide any history on the discovery of stomata. He does not reveal the history behind the riddle of where the released oxygen comes from either.)

Please keep track of the questions you have as you watch this last part. (Isotopes? Chromatograms? Interpreting the evidence? Pathways–steps of reactions? Splitting carbon from carbon dioxide? Importance of cells? How do you understand what happens in the chloroplast? How does photosynthesis relate to the carbon cycle? How does photosynthesis relate to fossil fuels? What connection is suggested between the electrolysis of water and photosynthesis? )

The Source of Oxygen Produced in Photosynthesis:

http://bcs.whfreeman.com/webpub/Ektron/Hillis%20Principles%20of%20Life2e/Animated%20Tutorials/pol2e_at_0604_The_Source_of_the_Oxygen_Produced_by_Photosynthesis/pol2e_at_0604_The_Source_of_the_Oxygen_Produced_by_Photosynthesis.html

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9 Feb Science 7 Beginning Field Study #1–Survey of Campus Trees

  1. Be sure to complete gathering and organizing information from previous class on your partner trees.
  2. Share information that you think is the most interesting.
  3. Share tree poems.
  4. Notice: See Dr. F about opportunities for Science and Service. Today–building and flying air-pressure water rockets with middle school Reach Out. Tomorrow–literacy and science at the Hope Foundation School with Hope Club (Dr. Seuss–Bartholomew and the Oobleck). Upcoming–Magnets and electromagnetism with Each One Teach One. Check out visits to the Blind School–think of hands on science exploration suitable for the visually impaired–and to Ms. Madhu Kapoor’s Yamuna Kids. Also, to be arranged, sessions with Making a Difference classes led by high school students–former M.S. science students! Would love help and participation from any current AES middle school students.
  5. Begin Field Study #1–A Survey of Campus Trees at AES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Organize your group. Conduct a task analysis. Plan procedures/protocols. 

Period 1 will cover Zones 2 and 3.

Zone 2

Tomas, Denzel, Chihaya, DoWoo, Bailey, Michal, YeonWoo

Zone 3

Boris, Anton, JaeHun, HeeJun, Avanka, Pauline, Yaroslav

Zone 4

Alanoud, YuBin, JaeHa, David, Halen, HanGyeol

Zone 5

Liam, JaeJun, Gabi, YuMin, JiWoo, Reyha

Zone 1

Merrick, Max, Sulaimaan, Sophie, Ananya, Marvin

Tasks–Collect and organize observations and data for the following:

A. How many species of tree are in your area?

(Tree = woody plant; at least 2 meters tall, planted in the ground.)

B. What is the identify of each species? (Scientific name, local name, common English name) In the beginning you may designate different species as species A, species B, etc. Use descriptions to establish species. Distinguish between species and particular specimens.

C. How many specimens of each species occur in your zone?

D. Where are the trees found? You may make a sketch map–estimating the locations as precisely as you can.

E. (later) Plant family to which each species belongs. Girth of largest specimen of each species in your area. Presence of flowers–listing dates for observation and approximate number. Presence of fruits–listing dates for observation, approximate numbers, estimate of “ripeness.”

F. Make note of animals you see (birds, mammals, insects, spiders, etc.). If you see an old nest, for example, in one of your specimens, take a picture, make a note. If you see birds building a nest, for example, take a picture, make a note. If you see an insect (caterpillar), eating a leaf of one of the trees, take a picture, make a note.

Useful information below:

trees for campus qr code

Partner trees Science 7 1718   

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1dZ98jj6Cba88W8WAfXMi9FnHx52BMMWqECvX0U_iMBA/edit?usp=sharing

Some native trees:  suitabletreesdelhi

Compare the results of tree surveys by Sci 7 2015-2016s and 2016-2017

  1. 2016-17 Pd8: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/10Cn1AfKkJyn9sw6CqiqEKldKlSElFLnGuILofRyMm-s/edit?usp=sharing
  2. 2016-17 Pd6: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/110bXByMlkl6xHnX2nOhG8T1SJKmix273nlffkzCVfNk/edit?usp=sharing
  3. 2016-17 Pd5: https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/10RdXmdn9v1838NjucBgUKcAR1SCu8o4YSyjeEUhIPRg/edit?usp=sharing
  4. 2015-16 Period8 treelistperiod8 or https://docs.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/spreadsheets/d/1R3UemPGz8uowhkVtk43QhMRHLaIwWhMt4GyS2jsyaBc/edit?usp=sharing
  5. 2015-16 Period6  tree survey period6 or https://drive.google.com/a/aes.ac.in/file/d/0B4DPwlouN3dIeDdseWVUZEVWYTg/view?usp=sharing
  6. Tree list from FMO 2014-2015 school year (includes campus housing) Trees at AES 20142015 FMO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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